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Nick Brethauer
Nick Brethauer committed Oct 28, 2015
1 parent 5ba048d commit 2ca96ec00a62b45ef43d84da567c025aae635dbb
Showing with 60 additions and 198 deletions.
  1. +0 −3 Gemfile.lock
  2. +9 −23 README.md
  3. +26 −12 _config.yml
  4. +25 −1 index.md
  5. +0 −31 pages/break-down-hypotheses.md
  6. +0 −10 pages/bring-into-agile.md
  7. +0 −20 pages/build-hypotheses.md
  8. +0 −69 pages/declare-assumptions.md
  9. +0 −29 pages/problem-statement.md
@@ -79,6 +79,3 @@ DEPENDENCIES
guides_style_18f
jekyll
rouge

BUNDLED WITH
1.10.6
@@ -1,32 +1,18 @@
## 18F Guides Template
## 18F Guide to using lean UX methodology

This is a skeleton repo containing the DOCter-based Jekyll template for 18F
Guides.
*An interactive guide (and template) on how to plan and structure projects that use experiments to drive toward outcomes, using agile and scrum methodologies.*

### Generating the site/hosting locally
[Access the guide here](https://pages.18f.gov/LeanUX)

You will need [Ruby](https://www.ruby-lang.org) ( > version 2.1.5 ). You may
also consider using a Ruby version manager such as
[rbenv](https://github.com/sstephenson/rbenv) to help ensure that Ruby version
upgrades don't mean all your [gems](https://rubygems.org/) will need to be
rebuilt.
###What is lean UX?

To run your own local instance:
Lean UX is a collaborative, outcome-focused product development and project management philosophy and process. It builds on agile and lean principles and provides a structured way to build software through quick, iterative experiments — all within a scrum and agile sprint framework. *Note: Lean UX can be adapted to other management and development frameworks, such as Kanban, but for this guide we will focus on scrum and agile.*

Doing lean UX means fundamentally changing your team’s focus from outputs (for example, features, functionality, colors) to outcomes (the changes in user behavior you want to see).

```
$ git clone git@github.com:18F/guides-template.git MY-NEW-GUIDE
$ cd MY-NEW-GUIDE
$ ./go init
$ ./go serve
```
### Thanks

This will check that your Ruby version is supported, install the [Bundler
gem](http://bundler.io/) if it is not yet installed, install all the gems
needed by the playbook, and launch a running instance on
`http://localhost:4000/guide/`.

After going through these steps, run `./go` to see a list of available
commands. The `serve` command is the most common for routine development.
Our guide is based on ideas and materials from Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden's book: *Lean UX.*

### Public domain

@@ -26,30 +26,44 @@ navigation:
- text: Introduction to Lean UX
url: index.html
internal: true
- text: Gather your research & create your problem statement
url: problem-statement/
- text: 1. Conduct discovery research
url: 1-discovery-research/
internal: true
- text: Declare your Assumptions
url: declare-assumptions/
- text: 2. Write a problem statement
url: 2-problem-statement/
internal: true
- text: Prioritize Assumptions, then Build Hypotheses
url: build-hypotheses/
- text: 3. Identify your assumptions
url: 3-identify-assumptions/
internal: true
- text: Select & Break Down Hypotheses
url: break-down-hypotheses/
- text: 4. Select assumptions
url: 4-select-assumptions/
internal: true
- text: Bring into Agile
url: bring-into-agile/
- text: 5. Develop broad hypotheses
url: 5-develop-hypotheses/
internal: true
- text: Images
url: images/
- text: 6. Prioritize broad hypotheses
url: 6-prioritize/
internal: true
- text: 7. Break down hypotheses
url: 7-break-down/
internal: true
- text: 8. Groom the backlog
url: 8-groom-backlog/
internal: true
- text: 9. Plan the sprint and kick off the agile cycle
url: 9-plan-sprint-agile/
internal: true


repos:
- name: LeanUX
description: Main repository
url: https://github.com/18F/LeanUX

back_link:
url: "https://pages.18f.gov/guides/"
text: Back to 18F Guides

defaults:
-
scope:
@@ -1,6 +1,30 @@
---
title: Introduction to Lean UX
---
*An interactive guide (and template) on how to plan and structure projects that use experiments to drive toward outcomes, using agile and scrum methodologies.*

The following process will help you get your project started on the right foot and oriented towards outcomes & metrics. Get the whole team (always include the product owner!) together for these activities.
###What is lean UX?

Lean UX is a collaborative, outcome-focused product development and project management philosophy and process. It builds on agile and lean principles and provides a structured way to build software through quick, iterative experiments — all within a scrum and agile sprint framework. *Note: Lean UX can be adapted to other management and development frameworks, such as Kanban, but for this guide we will focus on scrum and agile.*

Doing lean UX means fundamentally changing your team’s focus from outputs (for example, features, functionality, colors) to outcomes (the changes in user behavior you want to see).

###How does lean UX work?

Lean UX happens through hypothesis-driven development. Instead of thinking of a project as a set of requirements to complete, think of it as a set of educated guesses about what will accomplish the desired outcomes — for both the business and the end user. Your project can be seen as a series of experiments that you are consistently conducting in close collaboration with your users. Each experiment informs the next so that you’re always building on the things that bring you closer to your desired outcomes and removing or adjusting things that are not helping you reach your goals.

These hypotheses start at the very beginning of your project discovery process by explicitly identifying and tackling the business assumptions around the product. For example, it is equally important to test your assumptions about who your target audience is (and how to reach them) as it is to test assumptions about a feature of the product. In lean UX, the idea is for the whole project team to think holistically and not separate product development from project strategy.

**In general, the lean UX process has these steps**

>1. [Conduct discovery research]({{site.baseurl}}/1-discovery-research/)
2. [Write a problem statement]({{site.baseurl}}/2-problem-statement/)
3. [Identify assumptions]({{site.baseurl}}/3-identify-assumptions/)
4. [Select assumptions]({{site.baseurl}}/4-select-assumptions/)
5. [Develop broad hypotheses]({{site.baseurl}}/5-develop-hypotheses/)
6. [Prioritize broad hypotheses]({{site.baseurl}}/6-prioritize/)
7. [Break down broad hypotheses]({{site.baseurl}}/7-break-down/)
8. [Groom the backlog]({{site.baseurl}}/8-groom-backlog/)
9. [Plan the sprint and kick off the agile cycle]({{site.baseurl}}/9-plan-sprint-agile/)
A note for UX practitioners: Lean UX may change how you do UX research. Some UX practitioners are used to writing big reports at the conclusion of their research. In Lean UX, iteration and learning over repeated experiments is valued over breadth of research. You should document the results of your hypothesis test clearly and concisely so you can share them quickly with your team, learn from them, and devise another experiment.

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