The uniassert library is a small collection of useful macros.
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uniassert

The uniassert library is a small collection of useful macros. Most of them are designed for assumption checks (and this is a reason behind the library name).

This library was tested on gcc 4.8+, clang 3.5+ and MSVS 2013+, but will probably work on any c++ compiler with c++11 support.

Assumption checks

Using

UNI_EMPTY_EXPRESSION

This simple macro does nothing but requires trailing semicolon if is used as single statement.

UNI_ASSERT

If you are familiar with assert from the standard library, BOOST_ASSERT from boost or Q_ASSERT from Qt, you already know how to use UNI_ASSERT. For all others we recommend to read Wikipedia article Assertion (software development). By default UNI_ASSERT defined as UNI_EMPTY_EXPRESSION if NDEBUG is defined (almost always true for release builds) or equal to assert otherwise (_ASSERTE for MSVS in most cases), but this behavior can be changed (see "Configuration" section). If UNI_ASSERT is not defined as UNI_EMPTY_EXPRESSION then UNI_ASSERTS_ENABLED macro is defined. You can use it for generating additional code for assumption checks (see example below).

#if defined(UNI_ASSERTS_ENABLED)
bool my_complex_check()
{
    ...
}
#endif

...

UNI_ASSERT(my_complex_check());

...

You can use UNI_ASSERT in other macros but make sure that the expression is evaluated only once.

UNI_VERIFY

UNI_VERIFY is similar to BOOST_VERIFY from boost. It has exactly the same behavior as UNI_ASSERT, except that the expression passed to UNI_VERIFY is always evaluated.

UNI_VERIFY uses UNI_ASSERT but the expression is evaluated only once.

UNI_ENSURE_THROW

UNI_ENSURE_THROW(condition[, exception_type], message)

UNI_ENSURE_THROW throws exception if condition is not equal to true. If exception_type is not specified, std::runtime_error is thrown. In that case message must be a C string, std::string or any other type that can be implicitly converted to these types. If exception_type is specified, it must be constructable from the message type.

UNI_ENSURE_THROW uses UNI_ASSERT but the expression is evaluated only once.

UNI_ENSURE_RETURN

UNI_ENSURE_RETURN(condition[, return_code])

UNI_ENSURE_RETURN returns return_code if condition is not equal to true. If UNI_ENSURE_RETURN is used in a function with void result type, return_code must be omitted.

UNI_ENSURE_RETURN uses UNI_ASSERT but the expression is evaluated only once.

Configuration

To configure uniassert library add additional defines before including uniassert.h. These defines can be added either by passing additional parameters to a compiler, or by adding them inside your own proxy header (see example below).

myassert.h:

#define PARAM VALUE
#include <uniassert.h>

code.cpp:

#include <myassert.h>

In later examples we will provide code for the second case, but uniassert.h include will be skipped.

UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER

It is possible to call an external function when an assumption check is failed. If you don't want to change assertion handler in runtime, define UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER (see below). Otherwise you should define UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER.

If both UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER and UNI_ASSERTS_ENABLED are defined then UNI_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER_DEFINED is defined and you can use uniassert::set_assert_handler function to set new assertion handler and get the previous one.

If no assertion handler is set (by default), UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT macro will be used.

There are two helper classes aimed to be used in unit tests to temporary change or disable current assertion handler: assert_handler_guard and disable_asserts_guard. These classes are always there if UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER is defined even when UNI_ASSERTS_ENABLED is not defined.

UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER

It is possible to call an external function when an assumption check is failed. All you need is to define UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER and implement uniassert::assertion_failed function somewhere else:

#if defined(UNI_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER_DEFINED)
namespace uniassert
{

void assertion_failed(char const * assertion, char const * file, char const * function, int line)
{
    // Something useful
}

} // namespace uniassert
#endif

If UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER and UNI_ASSERTS_ENABLED are defined and UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER is not defined then UNI_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER_DEFINED is defined. You can check it when defining function uniassert::assertion_failed (see example above).

UNI_FUNCTION

The function description passed to uniassert::assertion_failed is compiler specific. We use __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ for gcc and clang, __FUNCSIG__ for MSVS and __func__ in other cases. If you think that the generated function description is too long (or your compiler has a better macro for that), you can define your own UNI_FUNCTION:

#define UNI_FUNCTION COMPILER_SPECIFIC_FUNCTION_NAME

UNI_FUNCTION is always defined and you can use it in your own code.

UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT

By default UNI_ASSERT is mapped to assert or _ASSERTE for MSVS, but one can change this mapping by defining UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT:

#define UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT YOUR_OWN_ASSERT

If both UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT and UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER are defined, UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT will be ignored.

UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT_HEADER

If your UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT requires any additional header to be included, you can also define UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT_HEADER:

#define UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT_HEADER <QtCore/QtGlobal>
#define UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT Q_ASSERT

UNI_DISABLE_ASSERTS

You can disable UNI_ASSERT even for debug builds by defining UNI_DISABLE_ASSERT.

If both UNI_DISABLE_ASSERTS and UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER are defined, UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER will be ignored.

If both UNI_DISABLE_ASSERTS and UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER are defined, UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER will be ignored.

UNI_FORCE_ASSERTS

By default UNI_ASSERT does nothing if NDEBUG is defined (almost always true for release builds). This check can be disabled by defining UNI_FORCE_ASSERTS. You should probably define either UNI_SYSTEM_ASSERT, UNI_ENABLE_DYNAMIC_ASSERT_HANDLER or UNI_ENABLE_STATIC_ASSERT_HANDLER, otherwise internal macro can still do nothing.

If both UNI_FORCE_ASSERT and UNI_DISABLE_ASSERTS are defined, UNI_FORCE_ASSERTS will be ignored.

Additional macros

Condition checks

Single-line checks are useful even in general code. These macros don't use UNI_ASSERT.

UNI_CHECK_THROW

UNI_CHECK_THROW(condition[, exception_type], message)

See UNI_ENSURE_THROW.

UNI_CHECK_RETURN

UNI_CHECK_RETURN(expr[, return_code])

See UNI_ENSURE_RETURN.

General macros

UNI_EMPTY_EXPRESSION

See UNI_EMPTY_EXPRESSION in "Assumption checks" section.

UNI_UNUSED

You can suppress warnings for unused variables with the help of UNI_UNUSED macro:

void func(int variable)
{
    UNI_UNUSED(variable);
}

Of course, int /*variable*/ works on any known compiler, but variable can be used (or not used) based on defined macros and UNI_UNUSED is a common case solution.

UNI_FUNCTION

See UNI_FUNCTION in "Assumption checks" section.