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added readme file finally

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1 parent 4ac1879 commit 85a99cd1da0067c89f3d762b0bd89dd4a174e6cf @AdamAtomic committed Aug 22, 2011
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+ABOUT FLIXEL
+=======================================================
+Flixel is an open source game-making library that is completely free for personal or commercial use. Written entirely in ActionScript 3 by Adam “Atomic” Saltsman, and designed to be used with free development tools, Flixel is easy to learn, extend and customize. Flixel has been used in hundreds of games, including IGF nominees, Adult Swim games, and avant-garde experiments. Many Flixel users make their first game ever in Flixel.
+
+BASIC FEATURES
+=======================================================
+Flixel includes some basic features common to
+many game engines or other game libraries.
+Display thousands of moving objects
+Basic collisions between objects
+Group objects together for simplicity
+Easily generate and emit particles
+Create game levels using tilemaps
+Text display, save games, scrolling
+Mouse & keyboard input
+Math & color utilities
+
+ADVANCED FEATURES
+=======================================================
+Record and play back replays
+Powerful interactive debugger
+Camera system for split screen
+Pathfinding and following
+Easy object recycling
+
+HISTORY
+=======================================================
+Adam started working on Flixel in March of 2008, and released the first public version in June 2009. Probably the most commonly asked question about Flixel is "where did it come from?" so we've included a short explanation here.
+“I tried a few different times to make a little game engine type thing that would allow me to make retro games. That just seemed like a fun thing to be able to do for fun on a weekend. I tried it in C++/Python/OpenGL right when I left school, maybe 7 years ago? Anyways, it was a failure. Once ActionScript 3 came out, I was able to do some of the pixel-level stuff that I was really interested in. However, by the time I got my hands on AS3, I was more interested in just making little games, and seeing what patterns evolved. I kept making more complex games by reusing the code from the last project, and eventually those parts that I was seeing in every project got moved to their own folder. I think a lot of coders out there have a folder like this on their hard drive somewhere.”

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