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<section>
<h1>How To Not<br>Get Dizzy</h1>
<h4>Five Things Figure Skating Taught Me About Debugging My Life and Career</h4>
<p>
<small>Created by
<a href="http://aimeemarieknight.com">Aimee Knight</a>
</small>
</p>
<img src="img/svef-stem.png" style="width: 500px;">
</section>
<section>
<ul>
<li>Software Engineer/DevOps Engineer</li>
<li>Google Developer Expert</li>
<li>Hobbies: JavaScript Jabber Podcast, ⛸, 🏋, running, biking</li>
<li>Likes: 😻😻, 🍵, kombucha</li>
</ul>
<aside class="notes">
Work on the systems that allow you to watch the super bowl.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<img src="img/amk_skate.gif" style="width: 370px;">
<p>From the age of 5 to 18 I was a professional figure skater.</p>
<aside class="notes">
It's those traits I developed as an athlete that helped me succeed in STEM and what I want to talk to you about today.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>When people find out I used to be a professional figure skater, they always ask me the same two questions.</p>
</section>
<section>
<ul>
<li>Can you do a triple axel?</li>
<li class="fragment">And how do you not get dizzy doing all those spins?</li>
</ul>
</section>
<section>
<h3>The answers to the first question is easy</h3>
<aside class="notes">
No, but I can do a double axel. When I skated women didn't do triple axels.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Then there’s the second question,<br><span class="emphasis">“How do you not get dizzy?”</span></h3>
</section>
<section>
<p>Out on the ice, we’re spinning at more than<br>300 revolutions per minute; (the same amount of centrifugal force they use to train astronauts.)</p>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Ever hear of the vomit comet?</h3>
<aside class="notes">
It’s the simulator NASA uses to get astronauts ready for space.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Look on YouTube and you’ll see lots of big, tough jet pilots barfing their guts out.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>Go to a skating competition any weekend and you’ll see twelve nine-year-olds spinning at least that fast... and not a drop of vomit in sight.</p>
<img src="img/spinning.gif">
</section>
<section>
<h3>So, how do we actually not get dizzy?</h3>
<aside class="notes">
The first part of that answer is easy,<br>and then it gets more complicated.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Let’s take the easy part first.</h3>
<h3 class="fragment">Say it with me.</h3>
<h2 class="fragment">Practice.</h2>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Repetition is what creates muscle memory.</h3>
<aside class="notes">
In my case, I’m talking about a whole lot of repetition; practicing morning, noon and night for hours, months and years.
<br>
Missing out on pretty much every childhood and teenage rite of passage.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Lots and lots of falls,<br>sprains and breaks.</h3>
<aside class="notes">
When I was 16 I broke my tailbone.
<br>
Do you know the worst thing about a broken tailbone? There's no cast.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #1:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">“Suck it up, Buttercup!” 😃</h2>
<aside class="notes">
I had a coach that used to shout that at me.
<br>
It stings when you’re little,<br>but it really will prepare you for life.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>If there’s one thing being a professional athlete teaches you, it’s how to lose gracefully.</p>
<aside class="notes">
As a programmer, you will fail a lot.
<br>
Over and over again.
<br>
Maybe because you made a mistake,<br>missed a deadline, <br>or for no discernable reason at all.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>The goal however is to win more than you lose... and you have to rick losing in order to win.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>If you think success means winning every single time, you’re in for a lifetime of disappointment.</p>
<aside class="notes">
When it happens, accept the defeat as gracefully as possible and examine it to see what you could have done to either change the outcome or which red flags you missed along the way.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Example: deleting a production database has come to be known as a rite of passage in tech.</h3>
</section>
<section>
<p>Yes, even I have.</p>
<h3 class="fragment" style="font-style: italic;">Thank God for back-ups.</h3>
<aside class="notes">
<p>What are some examples of your failures?</p>
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>The point is, we learned, and went on to start another day.</h3>
<aside class="notes">
Get up, dust yourself off and get back on the rink
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Do it to show the doubters your resilience, but more importantly, to remind yourself that the moments of our biggest defeats are also the seeds of our biggest triumphs.</p>
</section>
<section>
<h2>I love being an engineer!</h2>
<aside class="notes">
Working on cool sites, building things for friends to use
<br>
It’s my passion and it gives me purpose!
<br>
As you can see, I get excited about it and I love getting other people excited about it.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>And this, all of this, my entire career, was born out of stepping outside my comfort zone</p>
<aside class="notes">
The company I was working for had a terrible website
<br>
I kept making requests and suggestions to improve it, but no one seemed to have the knowledge or willingness to.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Late one night I thought, “No one else is fixing the website, maybe I’ll give it a try.”</p>
<aside class="notes">
So for weeks, I’d be awake in the middle of the night teaching myself to code and tweaking the site.</p>
<br>
And in doing that – just messing around<br>with their site – I got hooked.
<br>
I even got the attention of the programmers I worked with and they started helping me.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>I got totally obsessed with programming,<br>which was fantastic.</p>
<aside class="notes">
Not letting fear of the unknown or being a woman in a male dominated field hold me back.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Now, I was "Getting Comfortable Being Uncomfortable".
<aside class="notes">
I was making the most of the esources I had available to me and teaching myself something brand new.</p>
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #2:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">Push sideways to move forward</h2>
</section>
<section>
<img src="img/baby-steps.gif">
<p>How many of you know how to ice skate?</p>
<aside class="notes">
That’s what you do when you skate.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>How many go once a year over the holidays and hug the wall all the way around?</p>
<aside class="notes">
It still counts. You push sideways to move forward.
<br>
It’s not a terrible way to approach learning something new.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>When the road directly ahead of you is blocked, broken or just makes no sense at all,<br>push sideways and if you push steadily enough, eventually you’ll find yourself<br>ahead of where you were.</p>
<aside class="notes">
I promise you I didn’t know that messing around with an old website would get me here.
<br>
All I knew was that I was bored and and not being challenged.
<br>
I started going to meet ups and all people wanted to talk about was code.
<br>
I had found new friends even!
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #3:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">Be coach-able</h2>
</section>
<section>
<p>You have to be willing not only to listen to what you’re being told, but to truly hear it.</p>
<aside class="notes">
It’s not enough to have the desire<br>to acquire the knowledge.
<br>
If you’re doing something the wrong way and someone out there is willing to take the time to help you, try to apply the change and say thank you.
<br>
Be humble enough to believe that<br>there are people out there that have<br>more knowledge than you do.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>My best coaches always told me to<br>“control the controllable.”</p>
<aside class="notes">
Sometimes the only thing that’s within your control is your own attitude.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<blockquote>“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.” - Abraham Lincoln</blockquote>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #3 1/2:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">Be willing to coach others</h2>
<aside class="notes">
Actively pass on the knowledge you’ve acquired and teach others.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Tell your story, especially if your path is<br>non-traditional or if you don’t visually look like<br>the majority of people in the field.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>In psychology, there’s something called the Rosenthal effect that says that in life,<br>we get what we expect.</p>
<aside class="notes">
Don't fall victim to thinking certain fields aren't for you... give them a try first. You might just fall in love with it like I did.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>People in this industry come in all shapes, sizes, gender, colors and orientations,<br>as well as from all kinds of financial backgrounds.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>Not all nerds look like Bill Nye or like Star Wars.</p>
<img src="img/bill-nye.gif" width="450px">
<aside class="notes">
Which brings me to lesson number four.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #4:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">Turn your negatives into positives</h2>
</section>
<section>
<p>Biomechanically, what women lack in brute strength, they make up for in flexibility.</p>
<aside class="notes">
There are moves male skaters can’t do.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>There’s a move called the “layback spin” where you lean way back with your shoulders and your head super low.</p>
<img src="img/layback.gif">
<aside class="notes">
You’ll be hard pressed to find a male skater doing it though.
<br>
Trust me, it’s crazy difficult for anyone to do that move, but male figure skaters just don’t have the flexibility.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<h3>Pick moves and techniques that suit you.</h3>
<aside class="notes">
If you’re not built with the upper body strength to lift another human into the air and fling them around, find moves that showcase your own unique abilities.
<br>
Some people are sprinters,<br>some prefer marathons.
<br>
Know who you are. In programming, it's important to know how you learn best. Reading, building projects, watching videos on YouTube?
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>When you’re less experienced, acknowledge it and ask others to share their experience with you.</p>
<aside class="notes">
It's much better for people to know you haven’t had a chance to learn something yet than to think you learned it already and maybe you just stink at it.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>If you don’t look the same as the other people in the room don’t try to fade into the woodwork.</p>
<aside class="notes">
It won’t serve you or the project well. STEM needs all different kinds of people!
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>And after you’ve done all of that,<br>think about lesson number five. </p>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Lesson #5:</h1>
<h2 style="color: #00BFFF;">Stay in the moment</h2>
</section>
<section>
<blockquote>“Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift. That is why it is called the present.”  —  Alice Morse Earle</blockquote>
<aside class="notes">
Use your mental energy wisely.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>There’s no difference between preparing for a skating competition or a technical programming challenge although the wardrobe choices probably aren’t the same.</p>
<aside class="notes">
With both challenges you have to find a way to push all of that self-doubt out of your head and get laser-focused on the challenge at hand.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>You have to figure out how to stay in the moment for the big picture as well.</p>
<aside class="notes">
Don’t focus on where you want to be so intensely that you lose track of where you are right now.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Programming is very iterative.</p>
<aside class="notes">
You're approach to learning will be as well.
<br>
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>Step, test, step, test;<br>whether you’re writing code or debugging something or building a career.</p>
<aside class="notes">
We all like to think in the long term, but that’s just a blueprint, a wish list subject to all kinds of variables that are completely out of our control.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>It’s the day to day, week to week, month to month short term goals where the actual work gets done and where the momentum towards the long term goals is created.</p>
<aside class="notes">
To be great, you have to put the same amount of effort into every step of the journey.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>At the beginning of this talk I told you that the question I’m most frequently asked is, “How do you not get dizzy when you do all those spins?”</p>
<p>The short answer... practice.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>Here’s the more complicated answer...</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>In most sports where you flip and turn, you’re taught to keep your eyes focused on a fixed point.</p>
</section>
<section>
<p>In skating you’re taught simply to keep your eyes horizontal so that your view only spins around one axis.</p>
<aside class="notes">
Eventually our bodies and inner ears get used to the sensation, and with *years of practice* we get efficient at recovering from the dizziness, but we are human and we do feel it.
</aside>
</section>
<section>
<p>You can’t always prevent yourself from feeling dizzy or confused, but you can commit casting out fear and stepping outside your comfort zone to try something new.</p>
</section>
<section style="text-align: left;">
<h1>Thank you!</h1>
<img src="img/svef-stem.png" style="width: 500px;">
</section>
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