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+## Assignments:
+
+Assignments include weekly informed participation; two presentations; and a final, integrative, exegetical project.
+
+1. *Informed participation:* Half or more of each session will normally be of a seminar style, with discussions and activities, and even lectures will have an interactive component. Participation MUST reflect a careful engagement with the readings. "Informed participation" may include such activities as the professor introduces during sessions (e.g., work at Twitter assignments).
+3. *Narrative Criticism Presentation:* Each student will offer one presentation on a selection from Rimmon-Kenan. See above for expectations about presentations.
+2. *Form Criticism Presentation:* Each student will offer one presentation on a selection from Collins. Presenters will prepare a written handout, to be distributed to the instructor and classmates midnight the Friday before the date presenting. (If the A/V component embraces an organizing function, it may be distributed in place of a written handout.) Presenters should plan on 45 minutes of session time, of which no more than 20 minutes is a presentation delivered from a standing position with an A/V component, with the remaining time spent facilitating a planned discussion. MTS students should plan a presentation that could be delivered at a professional conference, with a thesis and an analytical perspective. See rubric.
+4. *Integrative, exegetical project:* this may be a final paper, or in the form of "digital storytelling." Either way, the assignment will include a satisfactorily exegetical component, focused on some aspect of the meaning of a text for Daniel's author(s) and its original audience(s). It will also include a component that integrates the student's other theological course work into a compelling story of personal significance. Support for both choices will be available: descriptions, rubrics, and in-class support and clarification.
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+## Course Description:
+
+Students will engage the book of Daniel theologically, in conversation with two distinct but related approaches to texts: narrative criticism and form criticism.
+
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+##Delivery Method and Requirements:
+
+We will meet weekly in person. We will use the Moodle learning management system, and also, we will adopt Twitter for a part of our course work. So, students will need regular internet access between sessions.
+
+*Technical Requirements:*
+
+1. Students must have regular, reliable access to a broad-band (high-speed) internet connection (e.g., DSL or cable; note that modem dial-up will not prove sufficient).
+
+1. Students should plan to open a Twitter account. Students may choose to open a pseudonymous account, though the pseudonym should be easy enough for classmates to recognize. Students with existing accounts may use these, or open a new, pseudonymous account.
+
+1. Students must have access to a reasonably up-to-date computer and operating system, sufficient to run an up-to-date web browser. Computers must play sound. For the "digital storytelling" project, a webcam may prove desirable. The G-ETS library has a limited number of laptop computers available for check-out. The Northwestern University Library has a computer center as well.
+
+1. Students must plan to use a recent version of a major Web browser (e.g., Firefox 3 or later; Safari 3; Google Chrome 4 or later; Opera 9 or later; MS Internet Explorer 7 or later). Note especially that MS Internet Explorer 6, still common on older machines, is NOT supported.
+
+1. Students must be able to work with files normal to the Microsoft Office environment, especially *.doc/*.docx, *.ppt/*.pptx. Many students with Apple computers can manage such files with the iWork suite of applications. Students without MS Office or Apple iWork might try the freely available OpenOffice application: http://www.openoffice.org/
+
+1. Some students may find it useful to have a headset with a microphone. These typically work with either Windows or Mac, have a USB connection to the computer, and are available at places like Radio Shack or Best Buy (phone first).
+
+1. Students may be asked to download and use safe, freely-available, cross-platform software like Apple QuickTime or iTunes.
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+## Grading:
+
+Informed Participation: 20%
+Narrative Criticism Presentation: 15%
+Form Criticism Presentation: 15%
+Final Project: 40%
+
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+## Learning Goals and Outcomes:
+
+Two ends are in view: one, that the student gain a deep and textured familiarity with this difficult and influential book and with the critical issues that have driven its study; two, that the student develop her ability to situate, amidst the continuing flowering of critical approaches, the pressing theological questions which she herself brings to Scripture.
+
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+**Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary**
+**Fall 2012, Tuesdays 8-11**
+(Revision Date: 2011_10_30)
+Instructor: G. Brooke Lester
+Email: first.last@garrett.edu
+Phone: 847-555-5555 (voice mail or text message)
+Office hours: Mondays 10-12, 3-5 *(appointments preferred; appointments via Gmail Video, Skype, or Google+ Hangouts are welcome)*
+
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+## Passages for Project:
+
+Options for topic of Exegesis Paper.
+
+Daniel 1:3-7.
+Daniel 2:46-49.
+Daniel 3:19-25.
+Daniel 4:28-33.
+Daniel 5:24-31.
+Daniel 6:10-15.
+Daniel 7:23-28.
+Daniel 8:9-15.
+Daniel 9:24-27.
+Daniel 11:29-35.
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+### Academic Integrity:
+
+Academic Integrity:
+
+**Plagiarism:** Please do not assume that you already know what "plagiarism" is. The "plagiarism" section of the *Student Life and Academic Handbook* describes at least four (4) different kinds of plagiarism, and includes helpful strategies for avoiding and correcting plagiarism. Students are responsible for becoming familiar with this teaching document. It is also available online here:
[http://www.northwestern.edu/provost/students/integrity/plagiarism.html][rlplagiarism]
+
+In the context of the requirements of this course, 11-603 "Prophetic Books: Daniel," students are encouraged to ask the professor any questions they may have about understanding and avoiding plagiarism.
+
+[rlplagiarism]: http://www.northwestern.edu/provost/students/integrity/plagiarism.html
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+### Attendance:
+
+Attendance philosophy: Learning is a collaborative endeavor, and students are obliged to offer one another their informed, prepared presence. We do not show up simply for ourselves, but for one another. "A rising tide lifts all boats," "No one can lift herself up by her own bootstraps," and so on.
+
+Opportunities missed on account of tardiness may not be made up. Excessive tardiness, or leaving early, can count as absence, at the instructor's discretion.
+
+For every absence, the student will write a 500 word summary of the readings assigned for that class, due one week from the date of absence. *Every* absence will have a negative effect on one’s grade. Per the Student Handbook, students who miss 20% of sessions (three sessions, or two sessions plus significant tardiness) will not pass the course.
+
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+### Courtesy:
+
+We agree to be fully present to our classmates during our sessions. Phones and laptops will only be used in ways directly related to activities underway during our class time. Students may not accept phone calls or TMs during class, nor engage in side conversations and side texting. Web-surfing not related to the activity underway is profoundly discourteous and will not be permitted. During quizzes and exams, all electronic devices must be turned off.
+
+Again: it is *not okay* to "take a break" during class and engage in unrelated web activity. This calls for special discipline and discernment in an environment where laptops and other devices are being used for course activities (Tweeting, editing Google Docs, doing web searches, and so on).
+
+If the instructor is persuaded that extra-curricular web activity has become a distraction, a no-laptop policy will be introduced, and it's likely that everyone will know that it is because of you.
+
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+### Disability:
+
+Students with special needs (learning, physical or other) who have filed satisfactory documentation of a disability in the office of the Dean of Students may receive reasonable accommodation from the instructor. Any student who files such paperwork with the Dean must please notify the instructor immediately.
+
+Please note that work completed by a student prior to filing such paperwork, or work completed by students who do not consent to have information about the disability released to professors, will stand as completed, even after such documentation is later filed. (That is, such work cannot be re-done or re-graded retroactively.) However, accommodation can commence immediately from the point that the instructor becomes aware of the need. (Note: If it is determined by a professional, certified physician that a preexisting condition has contributed to a students' impediment, then with proper documentation, some reasonable consideration may be given.)
+
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+### Late Work:
+
+Late work will not be accepted for review. Late means "late": please do not assume a "period of grace" beyond stated deadlines. For example, "midnight" means "midnight."
+
+*Plan your work so that an acute crisis—brief illness, computer or internet trouble, locusts—does not interfere with timely accomplishment of course work.* In the event of "late-breaking" acute troubles, the student should already have substantive, if incomplete, work prepared to turn in on deadline. Such work can be submitted by alternative means (by hand, by email) if conditions present the student no alternative.
+
+*Emergency:* occasionally, a student may suddenly require accommodation from the institution because of a genuine and time-consuming emergency. Such a matter should be brought to the attention of the Dean of Students and the office of the Academic Dean without delay. At the institution's discretion, a plan for completion of missed work might be arranged. This protects the student from unintended difficulties that can arise if she tries to make separate arrangements with individual professors.
+
+*Special Needs or Disability:* a student who believes her circumstances require extended deadlines for written work, or longer completion times for exams, may bring this to the attention of the Dean of Students and the office of the Academic Dean. At the Dean’s discretion, such arrangements might be made. Such arrangements will not be retroactive: they take effect when made. *See course policy, immediately below, concerning special needs or disability.*
+
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+## Policies:
+
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+**Lester's Rule of Engagement:**
+
+> When making any contribution to the course—in papers, discussion board posts, comments, or any other venue—ask yourself this question:
+
+> "Could I have made this contribution before ever having taken this class?"*
+
+> If the answer is "Yes," then the work is not yet appropriate to our shared endeavors. Every contribution should be of such a kind that one must have read our readings, heard our lectures, and participated in our discussions, in order to be able to make that contribution.
+
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+## Schedule:
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+Session Eight, March 20:Prepare: Collins, 27-59Dan 1-3Petersen, Norman R. "Literary Criticism in Biblical Studies."8:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 1-3.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 1-3.10:00: Activity
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+Session Eleven, April 17:Prepare:Collins, 83-89Dan 88:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 8.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 8.10:00: Activity
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+Session Five, February 28:Prepare: Rimmon-Kenan, Chapters 7-8: Narration.8:00: Presentation: "Focalization" and Daniel9:00: Presentation: "Levels and Voices" and Daniel10:00: Activity
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+Session Four, February 21:Peer review on research report due.Prepare: Rimmon-Kenan, Chapters 4-6: Text.8:00: Presentation: "Time" and Daniel9:00: Presentation: "Characterization" and Daniel10:00: Activity
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+Session Nine, March 27:Drafts due.Prepare: Collins, 59-73Dan 4-68:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 4-6.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 4-6.10:00: Activity
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+Session One, January 31:8:00: Orientation to course.9:00: Orientation to Daniel.10:00: Exegesis, Visual Essays, and Digital Storytelling
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+Session Seven, March 13:Peer review on prospectuses due.Rimmon-Kenan, Chapters 10-11: Conclusion and Afterthoughts.8:00: Presentation: "Conclusion" and Daniel9:00: Presentation: "Afterthoughts" and Daniel10:00: Activity
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+Session Six, March 6:Thesis statement with prospectus due.Prepare: Rimmon-Kenan, Chapter 9: The Text and its Reading.8:00: Presentation: "Speech representation" and Daniel9:00: Presentation: "The Text and its Reading" and Daniel10:00: Activity
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+Session Ten, April 3Peer reviews of drafts due.Prepare:Collins, review 1-24; read 74-83Dan 78:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 7.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 7.10:00: Activity
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+Session Thirteen, May 1:Prepare:Collins, 96-104Dan 10-128:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 10-12.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 10-12.10:00: Activity. Papers returned.
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+Session Three, February 14:Research report due.Prepare: Rimmon-Kenan, Chapters 2 and 3: Story.8:00: Presentation: "Events" and Daniel9:00: Presentation: "Characters" and Daniel10:00: Activity
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+Session Twelve, April 24:Final project due midnight, Friday evening, April 27. Prepare:Collins, 89-96Dan 98:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 9.9:00: Presentation: Critical Issues in Dan 9.10:00: Activity
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+Session Two, February 7:Prepare: Read Daniel 1-12 (see Moodle)Read Rimmon-Kenan, "Introduction."Read Collins, 1-24View Daniel A and B (QuickTime)View 5by5 Back to Work 38 "Sorry, You Can't Have a Candle."If necessary, open Twitter account.8:00: Issues in "Story"9:00: Activity based on reading Daniel10:00: Activity
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+## Texts and Resources:
+
+The following are required.
+
+1. Rimmon-Kenan, Shlomith. *Narrative Fiction.* 2nd edition. London: Routledge, 2002. ISBN-13 9780415280228 (pbk.). Cost appx. $31 (Cokesbury; only hardback currently available on Amazon for $110, or Kindle edition for only $10).
+2. Collins, John J. *Daniel: With an Introduction to Apocalyptic Literature.* Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1984. ISBN-10 0-8028-0020-3 (pbk.). Cost appx. $18 (Amazon or Cokesbury).
+3. NRSV study Bible, either Harper-Collins or Oxford. Cost appx. $36-$45.
+
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+# Prophetic Books: Daniel (11-603)
+

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