Mapping inheritance

Jimmy Bogard edited this page May 18, 2016 · 13 revisions

Mapping Inheritance

AutoMapper 1.1 had a method called .Include<> when creating your maps which allowed AutoMapper to automatically select the most derived mapping for a class.

Take:

    public class Order { }
    public class OnlineOrder : Order { }
    public class MailOrder : Order { }

    public class OrderDto { }
    public class OnlineOrderDto : OrderDto { }
    public class MailOrderDto : OrderDto { }

    Mapper.Initialize(cfg => {
    cfg.CreateMap<Order, OrderDto>()
          .Include<OnlineOrder, OnlineOrderDto>()
          .Include<MailOrder, MailOrderDto>();
    cfg.CreateMap<OnlineOrder, OnlineOrderDto>();
    cfg.CreateMap<MailOrder, MailOrderDto>();
    });

    // Perform Mapping
    var order = new OnlineOrder();
    var mapped = Mapper.Map(order, order.GetType(), typeof(OrderDto));
    Assert.IsType<OnlineOrderDto>(mapped);

You will notice that because the mapped object is a OnlineOrder, AutoMapper has seen you have a more specific mapping for OnlineOrder than OrderDto, and automatically chosen that.

Specifying inheritance in derived classes

Instead of configuring inheritance from the base class, you can specify inheritance from the derived classes:

Mapper.Initialize(cfg => {
cfg.CreateMap<Order, OrderDto>()
    .ForMember(o => o.Id, m => m.MapFrom(s => s.OrderId));
cfg.CreateMap<OnlineOrder, OnlineOrderDto>()
    .IncludeBase<Order, OrderDto>();
cfg.CreateMap<MailOrder, MailOrderDto>()
    .IncludeBase<Order, OrderDto>();
});

Inheritance Mapping Priorities

This introduces additional complexity because there are multiple ways a property can be mapped. The priority of these sources are as follows

  • Explicit Mapping (using .MapFrom())
  • Inherited Explicit Mapping
  • Ignore Property Mapping
  • Convention Mapping (Properties that are matched via convention)

To demonstrate this, lets modify our classes shown above

    //Domain Objects
    public class Order { }
    public class OnlineOrder : Order 
    { 
        public string Referrer { get; set; }
    }
    public class MailOrder : Order { }

    //Dtos
    public class OrderDto
    {
        public string Referrer { get; set; }
    }

    //Mappings
    Mapper.Initialize(cfg => {
    cfg.CreateMap<Order, OrderDto>()
          .Include<OnlineOrder, OrderDto>()
          .Include<MailOrder, OrderDto>()
          .ForMember(o=>o.Referrer, m=>m.Ignore());
    cfg.CreateMap<OnlineOrder, OrderDto>();
    cfg.CreateMap<MailOrder, OrderDto>();
    });

    // Perform Mapping
    var order = new OnlineOrder { Referrer = "google" };
    var mapped = Mapper.Map(order, order.GetType(), typeof(OrderDto));
    Assert.Equals("google", mapped.Referrer);

Notice that in our mapping configuration, we have ignored Referrer (because it doesn't exist in the order base class), but convention has a higher priority than Ignored properties in the base class mappings, so the property still gets mapped.

Overall this feature should make using AutoMapper with classes that leverage inheritance feel more natural.