Idris rules for Bazel
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README.md

Idris Rules Logo

Idris rules for Bazel

Build Status

The 13th episode of Ivor the Engine (in colour) is titled Unidentified Objects. Let's hope our codebase don't have any of those.

Idris the Dragon

Table of Contents

ToC created by gh-md-toc

Overview

Idris rules adds Idris support for Bazel. Bazel is a powerful and well maintained build tool with a lot of interesting characteristics. Combining Bazel and Idris rules, we get an idris build tool that:

  • Can build different types of components (executables, libraries and tests)
  • Make components easy to integrate between them
  • It's easy to configure (for example, there is no need to specify the list of files/modules of your component by hand)
  • Supports external dependencies. External dependencies only need to be Idris+Bazel projects hosted somewhere (like github, bitbucket, gitlab, ...). This means that, to support external dependencies there is no need to create and maintain some kind of central repository infrastructure. And it's easy for library developers to publish their work.

And there are more features to come

Getting Started

PREREQUISITES: Having bazel installed locally

Two quick options to get you started:

Add rules_idris to a bazel project

To get started with rules_idris, you only need to initialize them on your WORKSPACE file and you will be ready to go. For that you have two options:

Afterwards you might want to add an executable, a module or a test

Install idris_rules using nix

PREREQUISITES: Having nix installed locally

This approach allows nix to retrieve idris for you. In fact, in the future this will allow per project configuration of the idris version to use.

Add the following to your WORKSPACE file:

load("@bazel_tools//tools/build_defs/repo:git.bzl", "git_repository")
git_repository(
    name = "rules_idris",
    remote = "https://github.com/BryghtWords/rules_idris.git",
    tag = "v0.3"
)

load("@rules_idris//idris:idris_repos.bzl", "loadIdrisRepositories")

loadIdrisRepositories()

load("@rules_idris//idris:idris_loader.bzl", "loadIdris")

loadIdris()

Install idris_rules using a local idris installation

PREREQUISITES: Having idris installed locally

With this approach, you need a local installation of idris, and to tell bazel where to find it.

  1. Add the following snippet into your WORKSPACE file
load("@bazel_tools//tools/build_defs/repo:git.bzl", "git_repository")
git_repository(
    name = "rules_idris",
    remote = "https://github.com/BryghtWords/rules_idris.git",
    tag = "v0.3"
)

load("@rules_idris//idris:idris_repos.bzl", "loadIdrisPackagerRepositories")

loadIdrisPackagerRepositories()

load("@rules_idris//idris:local_idris_loader.bzl", "loadIdris")

loadIdris("/path/to/idris/installation") # That is, wichever path that contains 'bin/idris'
  1. Locate where you have idris installed (that is, the folder that contains bin/idris)
  2. On the text you have just added, replace /path/to/idris/installation with the correct path

Create an idris executable

Add the following into the BUILD file for your executable:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_binary")

idris_binary (
    name = "name_of_the_binary",
)

It will automatically pick up all the idr files from the same folder than the BUILD file

Create an idris module

Add the following into the BUILD file for your module:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_library")

idris_library (
    name = "name_of_the_library",
    visibility = ["//visibility:public"],
)

It will automatically pick up all the idr files from the same folder than the BUILD file

Test an idris module

If we want to test a library, like the one from the previous section, we should tweak it's BUILD file to look like this:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_library", "idris_test")

idris_library (
    name = "library_example",
    visibility = ["//visibility:public"],
)

idris_test (
    name = "test_example",
    deps = ["library_example"],
)

The idris_test rule is going to pick up all the idr files from the test subfolder from where the BUILD file is located. Each idr in the test should have a test method with this signature:

export
test : IO Bool -- This should be true if the test or tests in this suite are successful

The implementation of this method should return true if all the tests of this suite pass, or false otherwise. This will allow for easy integration with external testing libraries.

Tutorials

Create a simple hello world

Creating a basic project for a simple executable, is a simple three step process:

  1. Create the project
  2. Setup idris rules
  3. Add the executable module

Concerning Bazel

Bazel projects (also called workspaces) are collections of targets. For simplicity, I'm going to say that targets are things that can be built (this is not really true, but will help understand how bazel works).

In turn, this targets are organized into packages. All targets must belong to a package.

You can think of a workspace as a folder that contains a file named WORKSPACE. Everything in that folder and subfolders belong to the workspace. Likewise, the WORKSPACE file must live in the root folder of your project.

You can think of a package as a folder in the workspace that contains a file named BUILD. Everything in that folder and subfolders that are not packages themselves (that is, that don't contain a BUILD file) belong to the package.

If you look at this example:

|____my-package
| |____BUILD
| |____foo.h
| |____src
| | |____bar.cpp
| |____sub
| | |____BUILD
| | |____baz.h
| | |____src
| | | |____qux.cpp

my-package/foo.h and my-package/src/bar.cpp belong to the package my-package, where my-package/sub/baz.h and my-package/sub/src/qux.cpp belong to sub

It's also worth noticing that the root folder can be both the workspace and a package. That is, by containing both a WORKSPACE file and a BUILD file.

The WORKSPACE file holds general configuration for the project, things like what external repositories to access or tools to use. The BUILD files list the targets for that package.

1. Create the project

A bazel project is just a folder with a WORKSPACE file. Here we go:

mkdir my-project
cd my-project
touch WORKSPACE

2. Setup rules_idris

On this step you have to choose:

  1. To use the nix package manager (and install it if you don't already have it)

or

  1. To use a local installation of idris (and install it if you don't already have it)

After that, you basically need to add content on your WORKSPACE file to tell bazel how to get and use rules_idris. It's preatty much a copy-and-paste as explained in here if you use nix or, otherwise as explained in here if you use a local installation of idris

3. Add the executable module

This is where we create our first bit of idris. We will do three things:

  1. Create the package
  2. Create the idris code
  3. Configure the target

So first, as mentioned before, a package is a folder with a BUILD file. Starting from the root folder:

mkdir bin # we can name this folder whatever we want
cd bin
touch BUILD

Then we need a bit of idris code. Let's put this code in bin/Binary.idr:

module Main

main : IO ()
main = putStrLn "Hello, world!"

And finally, we need to tell bazel about it. Let's add this to the bin/BUILD file:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_binary")

idris_binary (
    name = "binary_example",
)

Let's try it

And that's it, we can now build it:

bazel build //bin:binary_example

Or run it:

bazel run //bin:binary_example

After running either command, you can find your new file at:

bazel-bin/bin/bin/binary_example

Open the idris console (the Repl)

You can open the idris repl with all the dependencies (external or otherwise) in scope. For example, if we want to play with the code from the previous tutorial, just run this:

bazel run //bin:binary_example_repl

To opend the repl for a module, there is an special module created for every idris rule that starts the repl. This module is named exactly like the rule, with "_repl" added at the end.

Create a simple module

Call it module or library, the distinction is quite difuse in bazel. What we are talking about is a bunch of reusable code that is not, by itself, an executable. For that, all we need is a target that describes how to create this module. And usualy, we put modules on their own packages.

This tutorial follows up from create a simple hello world, so from the root folder from the result of that tutorial, we are going to do the following:

  1. Create a package and module
  2. Implement some functionality for the module
  3. Make our binary use the module

1. Create a package and module

We only need a new folder and BUILD file:

mkdir lib
touch lib/BUILD

And tell the BUILD file about our new module. Write this into the BUILD file:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_library") # This puts the `idris_library` function in scope. It's basically an `import`

# This declares the new library
idris_library (
    name = "salutes", # Named `salutes`
    visibility = ["//visibility:public"], # Accessible from any other bazel target
)

2. Implement some functionality for the module

Let's start wit a simple bit of idris code. Create the file lib/Salute.idr, and add it's functionality:

module lib.Salute

export
salute : String
salute = "Hello, library example of idris"

3. Make our binary use the module

Two steps, first tell the binary target it can use the new module. Fot that, edit bin/BUILD to make it look like this:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_binary")

idris_binary (
    name = "binary_example",
    deps = ["//lib:salutes"], # This is the line that has been added
)

And finally, let's make un application use the library. Edit bin/Binary.idr, to use the new function:

module Main

import lib.Salute

main : IO ()
main = putStrLn salute

You can try your new code as explained in here.

Write a simple idris test

From the point of view of bazel, a test is an executable that once run its exit status id either 0 when everything has gone ok or not 0 if something has gone wrong. Bazel doesn't care for anything else.

For this purpose, idris rules provides idris_test. A rule that generates the executable's main function for you. And expects a single test function on each source file on the test module. This test functions must have this signature:

export
test : IO Bool -- This should be true if the test or tests in this suite are successful

Given that, only idris_library modules can be tested because the test itself must be an executable and merging two executables is dificult.

So, for this tutorial we are going to start from the result of create a simple module.

1. Write the test

Tests live on the test subfolder of the module you want to test. Since we are testing the lib:salutes module, from the root folder execute:

mkdir lib/test
touch lib/test/SaluteTest.idr

And write a simple test on lib/test/SaluteTest.idr:

module lib.test.LibTest

import lib.Library

export
test : IO Bool
test = pure (salute == "Hello, library example of idris")

2. Create the test module

Now, we only need to register the new test module. For that purpose, edit lib/BUILD to look like this:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_library", "idris_test") # CHANGE 1: This now also imports `idris_test`

idris_library (
    name = "salutes",
    visibility = ["//visibility:public"],
)

# CHANGE 2: Add the new test module
idris_test (
    name = "test_salutes",
    deps = ["salutes"], # This tells bazel to link the library we are testing into the executable that is going to run the tests
)

Let's try it

And that's it, we can now build our testing module:

bazel build //lib:test_salutes

Or run the tests directly:

bazel test //lib:test_salutes

NOTE: By default, bazel logs the result of running the tests but doesn't print them on STDOUT. If you want to see the results of running the test (which since there is no putStrLn is going to be empty anyway), you should run this:

bazel test //lib:test_salutes --test_output=all

Using external libraries

To make one of your modules use an external library, you need to a) declare it on your WORKSPACE file and b) make the module depend on it.

So, imagine we want to improve our tests from the previous tutorial. And for that, we want to make use of IdirsTest, an external library.

We will start this tutorial from the result of the write a simple idris test tutorial.

1. Declare the extenral dependency

First, we need to make our project aware of the external dependency. For that we need to add this to our WORKSPACE file:

git_repository(
    name = "IdrisTest",
    remote = "https://github.com/BryghtWords/IdrisTest.git",
    tag = "v0.1"
)

2. Depend on the external library

Second, we need to tell our module (in this case, our test) that it can use the external dependency. Let's modify lib/BUILD:

load("@rules_idris//idris:rules_idris.bzl", "idris_library", "idris_test")

idris_library (
    name = "salutes",
    visibility = ["//visibility:public"],
)

idris_test (
    name = "test_salutes",
    deps = [
      "salutes",
      "@IdrisTest//idristest:idristest", # CHANGE: This tells bazel that `test_salutes` should
                                         # depend on the `idristest` library from the
                                         # `idristest` package in the `IdrisTest` repo.
    ],
)

3. Use the external library

Finally, we can use the testing library to improve our test. Let's change our lib/test/SaluteTest.idr:

module lib.test.LibTest

import lib.Library
import idristest.Suite -- CHANGE 1: Import the tools from the IdrisTest

-- CHANGE 2: Add one unit test
testLibrary1 : (Bool, String)
testLibrary1 = assertEq
                 "Test salute"                      -- Test title
                 salute                             -- Result
                 "Hello, library example of idris"  -- Expected

-- CHANGE 3: Add another unit test
testLibrary2 : (Bool, String)
testLibrary2 = assertNotEq
                 "Test salute diff"                 -- Test title
                 salute                             -- Result
                 "Ups"                              -- Expected to be different

-- CHANGE 3: The main test function aggregates all the other tests
export
test : IO Bool
test = runTests [testLibrary1, testLibrary2]

Now you can run your test in the same way as explained in how to run your tests

Known Issues

  • Testing of the rules themselves needs to be improved. In the examples folder there is a prety big collection of bazel projects using rules_idris, with a different organisation each. And there is a 'test' script that builds and runs each of them in turn ensuring that everything goes well, but proper unit testing would be in order.

Other Idris build tools / package managers

  • Ikan - A package manager for idris, in idris
  • Elba - A package manager for Idris
  • idream - A simple build system for Idris

Roadmap

  • Improve testing integration
  • Add support for starting the idris console from bazel
  • Add support for the IDE mode on bazel projects
  • Support multiple idris versions
  • Add javascript and jvm rules
  • Migrate the companion IdrisPackager project from Scala to Idris
  • Improve reporting of test results