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A simple framework/cli tool to setup and sync (Webex Teams) API webhooks
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README.rst

WebhookSimple

Documentation Status Updates

A simple framework/CLI tool to setup and sync (Webex Teams) API webhooks

Features

  • Create, update and delete (Webex Teams) webhooks from a YAML file
  • Modular architecture makes it suitable for other APIs as well

How to Use

WebhookSimple is a simple (and open-source) python framework/command line tool that allows you to quickly describe your desired Webex Teams webhooks and then create or synchronise them for you.

WebhookSimple requires two files from you: vars.yml and hooks.yml

vars.yml specifies the different variables, while hooks.yml lets you specify the webhooks themselves.

A webhook always looks like this (in hooks.yml)

---
hooks:
  - name: test hook 1
    resource: "messages"
    event: "created"
    target_url: "https://your_url_here"

Make sure that the name of your webhook is always unique since this is what webhookSimple will use to identify and synchronise your webhooks. Your ::vars.yml:: must include an adapter that specifies the kind of API we are interacting with, as well as the authentication details. Leave this to the provided parser.WebexTeamsWebhookManager for now and add the access token in the correct spot.

vars.yml:

# vars file. The adapter section **needs** to be here
adapter:
  name: WebexTeamsWebhookManager
  authentication:
    access_token: your access token here
  parameters:

# Add your variables from here on
urls:
  - https://www.cisco.com
  - https://www.google.com

You can now setup, purge, list, export or sync your webhooks.

  • setup will delete all webhooks currently present for this bot and create new ones based on the hooks.yml file.
  • sync will update all existing webhooks based on the nameattribute and create those not present. It will not delete webhooks that are registered on the server.
  • purgewill delete all webhooks without creating new ones
  • listwill list all webhooks currently registered
  • export will save all your currently active webhooks to a .yml file

Invoke the module by running:

$ ls
hooks.yml vars.yml
$ python3 -m webhooksimple setup

Taking it one step further

Setting up a webhook from the command line, and based on a configuration file, is already pretty cool and convenient. But what if we have ten webhooks, and need to update the target_url on all of them? We’d have to manually edit all the webhook entries in ::hooks.yml::. This is where the ::vars.yml:: file comes into play. ::hooks.yml:: is not a simple configuration file but rather a Jinja2 template of a configuration file. What you can do is this:

vars.yml

---
# Note: Adapter part (see above) omited for bravity
url_prefix: https://my_url_base

hooks.yml:

---
hooks:
  - name: test hook 1
    resource: "messages"
    event: "created"
    target_url: "https://{{ url_prefix }}/messages"

But this is not all. Those that worked with [jinja2](http://jinja.pocoo.org/) before probably already know what is coming next. You can also add some (generator) logic here. Let's say we want to create two versions (_debug_ and _production_) of our webhook. We can do this by configuring the following:

vars.yml:

---
# Note: Adapter part (see above) omited for brevity
envs:
  - name: production
    url: https://my_production_prefix
  - name: development
    url: https://my_development_prefix

hooks.yml:

---
hooks:
  {% for env in envs %}
  - name: {{ env.name }} message hook
    resource: "message"
    event: "created"
    target_url: {{ env.url }}/messages
  {% endfor %}

Or if you want to setup the same webhook for different URLs, it would look like this:

vars.yml:

---
# Note: Adapter part (see above) omited for bravity
urls:
 - https://url_number_1
 - https://url_number_2
 - https://url_number_3

hooks.yml:

---
hooks:
  {% for url in urls %}
  - name: "hook for {{ url }}"
    resource: "message"
    event: "created"
    target_url: {{ url }}
  {% endfor %}

Happy programming! You can get WebhookSimple by running:

$ pip3 install webhooksimple

Do you have questions or found a bug? Feel free to hit me up on twitter @squ4rks.

Credits

This package was created with Cookiecutter and the audreyr/cookiecutter-pypackage project template.

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