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quorum-docker-Nnodes

Run a bunch of Quorum nodes, each in a separate Docker container.

This is simply a learning exercise for configuring Quorum networks. Probably best not used in a production environment.

In progress:

  • Remove the need to have Geth/Bootnode/Constellation installed on the host for the set-up process: use the Docker image instead, which already contains them.
  • Investigate adding Quorum network manager.
  • Further work on Docker image size.
  • Tidy the whole thing up.

See the README in the Nnodes directory for details of the set up process.

Building

In the top level directory:

docker build -t quorum .

The first time will take a while, but after some caching it gets much quicker for any minor updates.

I've got the size of the final image down to 391MB 308MB from over 890MB. It's likely possible to improve much further on that. Alpine Linux is a candidate minimal base image, but there are challenges with the Haskell dependencies; there's an example here.

Running

Change to the Nnodes/ directory. Edit the ips variable in setup.sh to list two or more IP addresses on the Docker network that will host nodes:

ips=("172.13.0.2" "172.13.0.3" "172.13.0.4")

The IP addresses are needed for Constellation to work. Now run,

./setup.sh
docker-compose up -d

This will set up as many Quorum nodes as IP addresses you supplied, each in a separate container, on a Docker network, all hopefully talking to each other.

Nnodes> docker ps
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE               COMMAND                  CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                     NAMES
83ad1de7eea6        quorum              "/qdata/start-node.sh"   55 seconds ago      Up 53 seconds       0.0.0.0:22002->8545/tcp   nnodes_node_2_1
14b903ca465c        quorum              "/qdata/start-node.sh"   55 seconds ago      Up 54 seconds       0.0.0.0:22003->8545/tcp   nnodes_node_3_1
d60bcf0b8a4f        quorum              "/qdata/start-node.sh"   55 seconds ago      Up 54 seconds       0.0.0.0:22001->8545/tcp   nnodes_node_1_1

Stopping

docker-compose down

Playing

Accessing the Geth console

If you have Geth installed on the host machine you can do the following from the Nnodes directory to attach to Node 1's console.

geth attach qdata_1/dd/geth.ipc

Otherwise, the following will achieve the same thing, attaching via the Geth instance in the container. If you do this, you'll have to copy transaction scripts used below into the qdata_N directories manually.

docker exec -it Nnodes_node_1_1 geth attach /qdata/dd/geth.ipc

Making transactions

We will demo the following, from Node 1's console.

  1. Create a public contract (visible to all nodes)

  2. Create a private contract with Node 2

  3. Send a private transaction to update the contract state with node 2.

This is based on using the provided example setup.sh file as-is (three nodes).

Node 1 geth console

> var abi = [{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"storedData","outputs":[{"name":"","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":false,"inputs":[{"name":"x","type":"uint256"}],"name":"set","outputs":[],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"get","outputs":[{"name":"retVal","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"inputs":[{"name":"initVal","type":"uint256"}],"type":"constructor"}];
undefined

> loadScript("contract_pub.js")
Contract transaction send: TransactionHash: 0x0e7ff9b609c0ba3a11de9cd4f51389c29dceacbac2f91e294346df86792d8d8f waiting to be mined...
true
Contract mined! Address: 0x1932c48b2bf8102ba33b4a6b545c32236e342f34
[object Object]

> var public = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1932c48b2bf8102ba33b4a6b545c32236e342f34")
undefined
> public.get()
42

> loadScript("contract_pri.js")
Contract transaction send: TransactionHash: 0xa9b969f90c1144a49b4ab4abb5e2bfebae02ab122cdc22ca9bc564a740e40bcd waiting to be mined...
true
Contract mined! Address: 0x1349f3e1b8d71effb47b840594ff27da7e603d17
[object Object]

> var private = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1349f3e1b8d71effb47b840594ff27da7e603d17")
undefined
> private.get()
42
> private.set(65535, {privateFor: ["QfeDAys9MPDs2XHExtc84jKGHxZg/aj52DTh0vtA3Xc="]})
"0x0dc9c0b85b4c4e5f1e3ba2014b5f628f5153bc2588741a69626eb5a40d2b30d6"
> private.get()
65535

Node 2 geth console

> var abi = [{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"storedData","outputs":[{"name":"","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":false,"inputs":[{"name":"x","type":"uint256"}],"name":"set","outputs":[],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"get","outputs":[{"name":"retVal","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"inputs":[{"name":"initVal","type":"uint256"}],"type":"constructor"}];
undefined
> var public = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1932c48b2bf8102ba33b4a6b545c32236e342f34")
undefined
> var private = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1349f3e1b8d71effb47b840594ff27da7e603d17")
undefined
> public.get()
42
> private.get()
65535

Node 3 geth console

> var abi = [{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"storedData","outputs":[{"name":"","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":false,"inputs":[{"name":"x","type":"uint256"}],"name":"set","outputs":[],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"constant":true,"inputs":[],"name":"get","outputs":[{"name":"retVal","type":"uint256"}],"payable":false,"type":"function"},{"inputs":[{"name":"initVal","type":"uint256"}],"type":"constructor"}];
undefined
> var public = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1932c48b2bf8102ba33b4a6b545c32236e342f34")
undefined
> var private = eth.contract(abi).at("0x1349f3e1b8d71effb47b840594ff27da7e603d17")
undefined
> public.get()
42
> private.get()
0

So, Node 2 is able to see both contracts and the private transaction. Node 3 can see only the public contract and its state.

Notes

The RPC port for each container is mapped to localhost starting from port 22001. So, to see the peers connected to Node 2, you can do either of the following and get the same result. Change it in setup.sh if you don't like it.

curl -X POST --data '{"jsonrpc":"2.0","method":"admin_peers","id":1}' 172.13.0.3:8545
curl -X POST --data '{"jsonrpc":"2.0","method":"admin_peers","id":1}' localhost:22002

You can see the log files for the nodes in qdata_N/logs/geth.log and qdata_N/logs/constellation.log. This is useful when things go wrong!

This example uses only the Raft consensus mechanism.

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