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The Selenified Test Framework provides mechanisms for simply testing applications at multiple tiers while easily integrating into DevOps build environments. Selenified provides traceable reporting for both web and API testing, wraps and extends Selenium calls to more appropriately handle testing errors, and supports testing over multiple browser…
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README.md

Selenified Testing Framework

Build Status

Build Status

The Selenified Test Framework provides mechanisms for simply testing applications at multiple tiers while easily integrating into DevOps build environments. Selenified provides traceable reporting for both web and API testing, wraps and extends Selenium calls to more appropriately handle testing errors, and supports testing over multiple browsers locally, or in the cloud (Selenium Grid or Cloud Tooling) in parallel. It can be a great starting point for building or improving test automation in your organization.

Getting Started

One of Selenified’s goals is to be a framework that is easy to drop in to an existing Java project. You can easily have Selenified running within minutes using an existing project, or a new one.

Note Selenified runs out of the box with Java 8, and modifications are required for alterrnate versions.

Adding the Selenified Dependency

Just add selenified.jar to your project, and you can start writing your test cases. If you’re using a build tool, simply add the jar as a dependency.

Maven

Update your pom.xml file to include (or add the dependency block to your current dependencies)

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.coveros</groupId>
        <artifactId>selenified</artifactId>
        <version>3.2.1</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

Ant

Update your ivy.xml file to include (or add the dependency block to your current dependencies)

<dependencies>
    <dependency org="com.coveros" name="selenified" rev="3.2.1" />
</dependencies>

Gradle

Update your build.gradle file to include (or add the testCompile line to your current dependencies)

dependencies {
    testCompile group: 'com.coveros', name: 'selenified', version: '3.2.1'
}

Sample File

It is suggested to setup your functional Selenified tests as integration tests, following typical java structure, in the src/test/java folder, in packages if desired. A sample file is included below, which will compile and run if you create the file src/test/java/ReadmeSampleIT.java, and paste in the contents

import com.coveros.selenified.Locator;
import com.coveros.selenified.Selenified;
import com.coveros.selenified.application.App;
import com.coveros.selenified.element.Element;
import com.coveros.selenified.services.Call;
import com.coveros.selenified.services.Request;
import org.testng.ITestContext;
import org.testng.annotations.BeforeClass;
import org.testng.annotations.DataProvider;
import org.testng.annotations.Test;

import java.util.HashMap;

public class ReadmeSampleIT extends Selenified {

    @BeforeClass(alwaysRun = true)
    public void beforeClass(ITestContext test) {
        // set the base URL for the tests here
        setAppURL(this, test, "https://www.coveros.com/");
    }

    @DataProvider(name = "coveros search terms", parallel = true)
    public Object[][] DataSetOptions() {
        return new Object[][]{new Object[]{"python"},
                new Object[]{"perl"}, new Object[]{"bash"},};
    }

    @Test(groups = {"sample"}, description = "A sample selenium test to check a title")
    public void sampleTest() {
        // use this object to manipulate the app
        App app = this.apps.get();
        // verify the correct page title
        app.azzert().titleEquals("Coveros | Bringing together agile and security to deliver superior software");
        // verify no issues
        finish();
    }

    @Test(dataProvider = "coveros search terms", groups = {"sample"},
            description = "A sample selenium test using a data provider to perform a search")
    public void sampleTestWDataProvider(String searchTerm) {
        // use this object to manipulate the app
        App app = this.apps.get();
        // find the search box element and create the object
        Element searchBox = app.newElement(Locator.NAME, "s");
        //perform the search and submit
        searchBox.type(searchTerm);
        searchBox.submit();
        //wait for the page to return the results
        app.newElement(Locator.ID, "recent-posts-4").waitForState().present();
        // verify the correct page title
        app.azzert().titleEquals("You searched for " + searchTerm + " - Coveros");
        // verify no issues
        finish();
    }

    @Test(groups = {"sample", "services"}, description = "A sample web services test to verify the response code")
    public void sampleServicesSearchTest() {
        HashMap<String, Object> params = new HashMap<>();
        params.put("s", "Max+Saperstone");
        // use this object to verify the app looks as expected
        Call call = this.calls.get();
        // retrieve the zip code and verify the return code
        call.get("", new Request().setUrlParams(params)).assertEquals(403);
        // verify no issues
        finish();
    }
}

In the first test, sampleTest, the App class is used to check the title of the page. In the next test, sampleTestWDataProvider, the App class is used to generate elements we want to interact with; type a search term, submit the search term and the wait for the page to load. We then use that same element in order to verify the title contains the same search term. The 'google search terms' dataProvider provides a search term to the test. In the third test, a call is made directly to the search api, then only the response code is verified. For more information on the App and Call class plus all the other classes used by Selenified, check out the documentation here.

Test Execution

To execute these tests, either do that directly from your IDE, or you can execute the below commands. More details on test execution and setup is located here.

Maven

If following the setup indicated, you'll need to use the failsafe plugin in order to execute the tests. Update your pom.xml file to include

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-failsafe-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>3.0.0-M3</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <goals>
                <goal>integration-test</goal>
                <goal>verify</goal>
            </goals>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

Then from the command line run

mvn verfiy

More details can be found on the Selenified Maven Wiki

Ant

If following the setup indicated, you'll need to setup your test files in a testng block. Update your build.xml file to include

<taskdef name="testng" classname="org.testng.TestNGAntTask">
    <classpath location="lib/testng-6.14.3.jar" />
</taskdef>
<target name="testng" depends="compile">    
    <testng classpathref="classpath" outputDir="./target" haltOnFailure="true" verbose="2">
        <classfileset dir="./target/classes" includes="**/*IT.class" />
    </testng>
</target>

Additionally, you'll need to add a target to execute your tests. Update your build.xml file to include

<target name="test" depends="testng" description="Run integration tests in parallel">
    <java classpathref="classpath" classname="org.testng.TestNG" failonerror="true" />
</target>

Then from the command line run

ant test

More details can be found on the Selenified Ant Wiki

Gradle

If following the setup indicated, you'll need to add a task to execute your tests. Update your build.gradle file to include

task selenified(type:Test) {
    useTestNG() {}
}

Then from the command line run

gradle selenified 

More details can be found on the Selenified Gradle Wiki

Writing Tests

Create A New Test Suite

Tests should be organized into suites. To create a new test suite, simply create a folder, or nested set of folders within the src directory. Within each folder, then create one or more Java classes. Name the class something descriptive following the test suites purposes.

Structuring the Test Suite

Have each class extend the Selenified class which is contained within the selenified.jar. Each should contain a method setting up some details to be used in each test, Only the AppURL is required, and if the URL is passed in from the commandline or properties file, even this can be excluded. Additional optional parameters are the author of the tests, and the version of tests or software under test. See below for an example:

    @BeforeClass(alwaysRun = true)
    public void beforeClass(ITestContext test) {
        // set the base URL for the tests here
        setAppURL(this, test, "http://172.31.2.65/");
        // set the author of the tests here
        setAuthor(this, test, "Max Saperstone\n<br/>max.saperstone@coveros.com");
        // set the version of the tests or of the software, possibly with a
        // dynamic check
        setVersion(this, test, "3.2.0");
    }

If the suite of tests do not require a selenium instance to run the test (e.g. API test), the suite should also contain a method to override the default startTest method. This needs to be annotated with @BeforeMethod(alwaysRun = true). This method will just call the super method of startTest and initialize everything needed. Since we do not need a Selenium driver, the last value passed into startTest should be set to 'FALSE'. See below for an example:

    @BeforeMethod(alwaysRun = true)
    protected void startTest(Object[] dataProvider, Method method, ITestContext test, ITestResult result) {
        super.startTest(dataProvider, method, test, result, DriverSetup.FALSE);
    }

Sometimes you may end up running some tests that require some browser configurations or changes to be made before the page is initially loaded. In order to launch the browser, but not load (and wait for the successful load) of a page, you also will want to override the default startTest method. In this case, the last value passed into startTest should be set to 'OPEN'. See below for an example:

    @BeforeMethod(alwaysRun = true)
    protected void startTest(Object[] dataProvider, Method method, ITestContext test, ITestResult result) {
        super.startTest(dataProvider, method, test, result, DriverSetup.OPEN);
    }

While proxy and remote running capability configuration settings are handled by the framework (see below sections on parameters), sometimes additional custom capabilities need to be setup for the test execution. If needed, additional capabilites can be set by adding them in a beforeClass method, similar to the author, version, and test site. Add whatever desired capabilities are desired, using the available addAdditionalDesiredCapabilities method. An example is shown below

    @BeforeClass(alwaysRun = true)
    public void beforeClass(ITestContext test) {
        addAdditionalDesiredCapabilities(this, test, "javascriptEnabled", false);
    }

With this in mind, it may be helpful to structure tests based on functionality and attributes under test. If a suite has multiple tests that will be running using similar tests, consider setting up some suite specific methods to run these tests. This will reduce the amount of code being written, and make updates quicker and cleaner.

Write the Tests

Adding a new test, is simply adding a new method to an existing test suite (class). Each method should be named something descriptive following the tests functionality. Each method should have a public modifier and have a void return type. Each method should have an @Test annotation before it. Putting in the below information in each annotation will ensure that the data is available in the custom test reporting.

  • a group - based on the test suite and the extended test suite
  • a description - something useful/descriptive to be displayed on the results and test detailed results
  • a dependency (optional) - based on either another group or test, or multiples
  • a data provider (optional) - if this test takes multiple inputs, allowing the test to run multiple times

If a class has multiple tests that are similar, but simply require one or two different inputs, a dataProvider should be used. Instead of writing multiple tests, one test can be written instead. This will reduce the amount of code being written, and make updates quicker and cleaner. A full example test can be seen in the included SampleIT.java class in the framework.

If you are defining your dataProvider parameters, be sure to include the variables defined in your declaring method.

Tests should always start in a known state, be sure you use your @BeforeMethod annotation to set this up if needed.

Simple Test Cases

The method body should start with one line, dependent on the type of test you plan to perform.

Browser

If you plan on running a browser based test, the first thing you should do is retrieve your app class.

    App app = this.apps.get();

This object will give you access to perform any required actions on the application, such as accepting an alert, asserting an alert is present, or reloading the page.

    app.acceptAlert();
    app.is().alertPresent();
    app.reloadPage();

If you want to interact with particular elements on a page, you can create them from this app object.

    Element element = app.newElement(Locator.XPATH, "//form/input");

Similar to the app object, any actions you want to perform on the element, can be done on this object, such as clicking on it, entering text, or selecting a value that it is available.

    element.click();
    element.type("hello world");
    element.select(1);
    element.select("value");

Sub functionality exists for both pages and elements, to make writing tests simpler. Objects exist for getting, checking, and waiting for things on the page. Additionally, objects exist for getting, checking, and waiting.

    app.is().alertPresent();
    app.get().alert();
    app.waitFor().alert();
    
    element.is().table();
    element.get().numOfSelectOptions();
    element.waitFor().displayed();

There are also custom checks associated with both the page and element objects. These checks are custom to the framework, and in addition to providing easy object oriented capabilities, they take screenshots with each check to provide additional traceability, and assist in troubleshooting and debugging failing tests.

There are two types of checks, asserts and verifys. Asserts immediate check that state of the system, and exit the test if there is a failure or mismatch, whereas verifys will perform the check, but keep moving forward with the test, and fail once all steps are completed. There are also waitFors which mirrors verify, except that it waits for the expected condition to be true. If the condition is never true, it will log an error, but keep moving on, similar to verify

    app.azzert().alertPresent();
    app.verify().alertPresent();
    app.waitFor().alertPresent();
    app.azzert().urlEquals();
    app.verify().urlEquals();
    app.waitFor().urlEquals();
    
    element.assertContains().text("hello");
    element.verifyContains().text("hello");
    element.assertExcludes().value("world");
    element.verifyExcludes().value("world");
    element.assertMatches().value("[a-z]");
    element.verifyMatches().value("[a-z]");
    element.assertEquals().rows(7);
    element.verifyEquals().rows(7);
    element.waitForEquals().rows(7);
    element.assertState().enabled();
    element.verifyState().enabled();
    element.waitForState().enabled();
Web Services

If you plan on running a web services based test, the first thing you should do is retrieve your call class.

    Call call = this.calls.get();

This object will give you access to make any required method calls on your web service, such as a get or post.

    call.get("post/");
    call.post("post/", request);

These calls return a response, which contain their own custom assertions. Similar to the browser based testing these asserts provide additional traceability and debugging assistance. both the response, and code can be verified

    call.get("post/").assertEquals(404);
    call.post("posts/", request).assertContains(response);
Authentication

Any of the above calls would occur without any authentication; they just are direct gets, posts, etc. Some basic authentication capabilities are built into Selenified. If you have simple user/password authentication for your services, Selenified makes it easy to provide those. Simply set the username and password as environment variables, and Selenified will automatically pick them up, and pass them along with your call. Don’t worry, they’re not passed in clear text, but encoded, and passed as header authorization information.

export SERVICES_USER=myusername
export SERVICES_PASS=mypassword

Instead of passing in credentials globally for your tests, you can set them at the suite or test level as well. Note that globally passed in credentials take precedence over any set in the test cases themselves. You can provide default credentials for an entire class, in the @BeforeMethod, just call the static setCredentials method.

setCredentials(this, test, "hello", "world");

These, credentials can be overridden on a test by test basis by providing them directly in the test case.

Call call = this.calls.get();
call.addCredentials("hello", "world");

You may have some more complex authentication scheme. That is not atypical. Unfortunately, in order to set this up, you’ll actually need to modify the source code a bit. Because authentication is performed in so many different ways, we don’t have a standard setup for oauth, csrf tokens, or others. Checkout the wiki for more information on authentication schemes.

Custom Headers

Custom headers can be added to web-services calls, for whatever purpose. They can add user-agents, custom required headers for sites, or even override the default provided headers. By default, all web services calls are made with Content-Type set to application/json; charset=UTF-8. This can be changed by overridding this header. Headers can be added on a per test basis, or can be added for all tests in a suite. Headers should be set as key-value pairs, in a HashMap.

Map<String, String> headers = new HashMap<>();
headers.put("X-Atlassian-Token", "no-check");

To set this on an individual basis, simply retrieve the Call object, and add the headers

Call call = this.calls.get();
call.addHeaders(headers);

To set the headers for an entire class, in the @BeforeMethod, just call the static addHeader method.

addHeaders(this, test, headers);

Finally, if you want to reset the headers, on a test by test basis (maybe you want to set up headers for all tests instead of one), you can call the resetHeaders method.

Call call = this.calls.get();
call.resetHeaders();
Finalizing your tests

Finally, in order to track errors within the tests, the last step of each test is comparing the value within errors to the number 0. This will then throw an error if any issues occurred during the test. All previous errors are caught and handled, to allow the test to run to completion if possible. This last line should read as follow:

    finish();

Using and IDE such as Eclipse will help you auto-complete desired commands, and the JavaDocs provided will outline each piece of functionality.

Using Page Object Model

Selenified supports allowing tests to be written following the Page Object Model (POM). Each page or module you want to use in this model, simply needs a constructor taking in the app object, where the desired page elements are defined. Then any workflows on the page can be easily written utilizing those elements.

public final class MainPage {

    // our page elements
    private Element click;
    private Element alert;
    private Element carList;
    public Element checkbox;

    public MainPage(App app) {
        click = app.newElement(Locator.CLASSNAME, "click");
        alert = app.newElement(Locator.CSS, "input#alert_button");
        carList = app.newElement(Locator.ID, "car_list");
        checkbox = app.newElement(Locator.XPATH, "//form/input[@type='checkbox']");
    }

    public void selectCar(String car) {
        carList.select(car);
    }

    public void assertCar(String car) {
        carList.assertEquals().selectedOption(car);
    }

    public void generateAlert() {
        click.click();
        alert.click();
    }
}

In order to use these models, your tests only need to instantiate these pages before running. This is done most simply in a @BeforeMethod call.

    ThreadLocal<MainPage> main = new ThreadLocal<>();;

    @BeforeMethod(alwaysRun = true)
    public void setupApp() {
        main.set(new MainPage(this.apps.get()));
    }

    @Test(groups = { "sample", "pom" }, description = "A sample test to perform searches")
    public void sampleTestWDataProvider() {
        // our test actions - use our threadsafe main object
        main.get().selectCar("volvo");
        main.get().assertCar("volvo");
        // close out the test
        finish();
    }

Locators

Selenified uses locators to find different elements on a webpage during testing. There are 8 different types of locators supported: xpath, id, name, classname, css, partial link text, link text, and tagname. Locators are used to navigate the HTML Document Object Model, returning a single web element or a list of web elements with common locator attributes. For example, you may create an element with the locator type 'tagname' and the locator 'h3' to then call the getWebElements method with the locator. This returns a list of all HTML elements on the webpage with the 'h3' tag. To be more specific, locators like id are often used to return a single web element, being that the id attribute of a web element is supposed to be unique. An elementMatch can also be provided when using locators that match more than one element. For example, calling the method click() on an element with the locator type 'classname', the locator 'filter-button', and the elementMatch 3 will return the third element with the class attribute equal to 'filter-button'.

Identifying Locators

The easiest way to identify locators for elements you want to test is to use a web browser. There are many tools to assist in finding locators, but you may not always need a tool. Start by right-clicking on an element and then click 'Inspect' (Chrome) or 'Inspect Element' (Firefox). From here you are then presented with the HTML source of the page with the selected element highlighted. Look at the element's attributes for a unique locator such as an id or class name. If your element has an id or class name, search through the rest of the webpage source to ensure that your element's id or class name attribute is unique. Command or Ctrl + F is the quickest way to do this. Other attributes can be used if unique as well, such as name, link text (if the element is a link), or tagname. If an element does not have a unique locator, you can use an xpath locator or provide an index to specify a single element out of all the elements that match the locator. To copy an element's xpath in Chrome, right click on the element after inspecting it and mouseover 'Copy', then click on 'Copy Xpath'. In Firefox, you'll have to use an Add-on like 'Xpath Checker'. Xpaths are powerful and can always provide a unique selector, but because of the way they often traverse the DOM specifically, they can be very brittle and possibly break with any change to your webpage layout.

Examples
Xpath
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.XPATH, "//*[@id='align_table']/tbody/tr[1]/td[1]/select[1]");
Id
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.ID, "car_list");
Name
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.NAME, "car_list");
Classname
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.CLASSNAME, "dropdown-default");
CSS
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.CSS, "#car_list");
Partial link text
Element nextImageLink = page.newElement( Locators.PARTIALLINKTEXT, "next");
Link text
Element nextImageLink = page.newElement( Locators.LINKTEXT, "next image");
Tag name
Element carList = page.newElement( Locators.TAGNAME, "select");
Duplicate locators

If you have a non-unique locator, something that would match multiple elements, you can tell Selenified which element to match. By default, the first matching element is used if not provided.

Element carList = page.newElement(Locators.TAGNAME, "select");

In this example, the first select element on the page is chosen to interact with.

Element carList = page.newElement(Locators.TAGNAME, "select", 4);

In this example, the fourth select element on the page is chosen to interact with. Note that element identification starts at 0. You can also dynamically change the element match during your test, which is useful when looping through tasks.

Element element = app.newElement(Locators.TAGNAME, "select");
for (int match = 0; match < element.get().matchCount(); match++) {
    element.setMatch(match);
    element.select(2);
}

Custom Actions

Sometimes, the action you want to perform isn't available via Selenified. Luckily this doesn't mean you need to abandon Selenified.

If you need to perform the custom action, use the app object to retrieve the driver.

    WebDriver driver = app.getDriver();

Then perform the action that you need to. You'll want to ensure this action is recorded in the Selenified reports. To do this, retrieve the reporter object from the app object, and call the pass/fail/check method.

    Reporter reporter = app.getReporter();
    reporter.pass(action, expectedResult, actualResult);
    reporter.check(action, expectedResult, actualResult);
    reporter.fail(action, expectedResult, actualResult);

Of course, if this is something that you believe others can benefit from, feel free to open an issue, or fork the repo, and submit a PR once it's implemented.

Running Tests

Parameters

The testing framework requires no parameters, but takes several optional input parameters. Each of these paramters can be passed in either via commandline (through System Properties), or they can be set in a properties file. The Selenified framework looks for a properties file named selenified.properties in the src/test/resources directory. Any of the below value can be set in either. If they are set in both location, the System Properties will override anything set in the properties file.

Application URL

This is the default URL that all tests should run against. As mentioned above, this value can be provided in each test, class, or even suite, but setting the value in this fashion will override anything set in the code itself.

-DappURL=www.example.org
-DappURL=192.168.1.1
-DappURL=https://192.168.1.1:6443

Browser

If unspecified the default browser of HTMLUnit will be used. Other supported browsers are Firefox (specified via Firefox or Marionette), Chrome, InternetExplorer, Edge, Opera, and Safari, PhantomJS (not on grid). To run most other browsers additional drivers may need to be added to the browser install directory. These drivers are all managed via the selenified jar. Browsers can be specified in two ways, either just noting the browser, or indicating the browser name and additional details. These additional details must include a name, and have optional parameters of version, platform and screensize. These should be specified like url parameters (key1=value1&key2=value2), and comma separated for multiple. Screensize can be provided in one of two ways, either as widthxheight or by specifying maximum implying you want the browser to be maximized. These make use of the Selenified calls resize and maximize respectively on browser start-up, before even loading the initial URL.

-Dbrowser=Chrome
-Dbrowser=Firefox,Edge
-Dbrowser="name=InternetExplorer&version=50.1&platform=Windows 10&screensize=100x200"
-Dbrowser="name=Chrome,name=Safari&version=12.0&platform=macOS 10.14&screensize=maximum"

Hub

If unspecified the tests will run in standalone mode. If a hub address is specified, then tests will run on a remove hub, either via Selenium Grid or any cloud tool. Specify the protocol, IP or DNS, and include the ports if needed.

-Dhub=http://localhost:4444
-Dhub=https://sauceusername:sauceaccesskey@ondemand.saucelabs.com
-Dhub=https://lambdausername:lambdaaccesskey@hub.lambdatest.com

Alternatively, your credentials can be set as environment variables. Set them as:

export HUB_USER='someusername'
export HUB_PASS='somekey'

Proxy

If this is specified, then the tests will be run through a proxy server at the specified address. Include the address and port in the parameter

-Dproxy=localhost:5013

Note that this will pass both browser, and web services traffic through an http proxy. If you are passing web services traffic through this proxy, and testing with ssl (over HTTPS), ensure your proxy's certificate is added to your java keystore

Headless

Currently, only Chrome and Firefox supports running in headless mode. To achieve this, simply pass in the parameter headless

-Dheadless

Options

Currently, only Chrome and Firefox supports adding additional options to launch the browser. To achieve this, simply pass in the parameter options with whatever browser specific options are desired. The headless parameter can either be passed in via the above headless parameter, or in this method. For multiple options, make them comma separated.

-Doptions='--disable-gpu,--headless'

Run Configuration

Each build tool has specific instructions for modifying what and how tests are run. Checkout the wiki to instructions for each build tool:

Build Name

Several tools, including Sauce Labs and Lambda Test, have the ability to group your tests, and assign them builds. By default, a build attribute will be assigned to each test run, which will have the datetime stamp, and the browsers executed. You can override this, by passing in the buildName parameter.

-DbuildName='Jenkins Run 123'

Be sure to make it something unique each time, or new tests might get associated with old test runs.

Eclipse

Expand the project in the left side navigational panel. Right-click on the Java package, class, or method containing the test(s) you want to run (for our example it is SampleTests.java), and select the Run As menu item, and click on the TestNG Test sub-item. This will launch the tests.

Once the tests have completed running, TestNG results will be displayed under the TestNG tab at the lower section of the screen.

If you want to provide inputs to the tests being run, when right clicking on the Java file containing test, select the Run Configurations... sub-item. On the option screen, select the Arguments tab on the upper left of the screen. In the Program arguments input area, enter in the desired input details to be tested as below:

-appURL=www.google.com -Dbrowser=Chrome -Dhub=localhost -Dproxy=localhost:8082

IntelliJ

Right-click on the Java package, class, or method containing the test(s) you want to run (for our example it is SampleIT.java), and select the Run (package, class, or method) menu item. This will launch the tests.

If you want to provide inputs to the tests being run, select Run -> Edit Configurations... from the top menu. On the option menu, under JDK Settings tab, add your options into the VM options field as below:

-appURL=google.com -Dbrowser=InternetExplorer -Dhub=192.168.1.10

You can enter these values under either your already created tests, or as the default, if you want all tests to use them.

Command Line

Ant

Open up the command prompt. Navigate to the folder where the Test Automation project is checked out using the cd command. Once at the folder, if these tests have been before, it’s best to clean out the results folder. Run the command:

ant clean

Once that completes, run the following command to execute the tests:

ant -DappURL=http://google.com -Dbrowser=Firefox -Dhub=http://localhost -Dproxy=localhost:8080

The default task is 'test', which can alternatively be executed, or could be chained with other commands.

ant test -DappURL=http://google.com -Dbrowser=Android -Dproxy=172.16.3.12:8080

Maven

Open up the command prompt. Navigate to the folder where the Test Automation project is checked out using the cd command. Once at the folder, if these tests have been before, it’s best to clean out the results folder. Run the command:

mvn clean

Once that completes, run the following command to execute the tests:

mvn verify -DappURL=https://amazon.com -Dbrowser=Edge -Dhub=https://172.16.3.12:6443

To specify different groups of tests to run, instead of manipulating the TestNG xml file, you can provide an additional parameter, failsafe.groups.include with the desired group to test

mvn verify -Dfailsafe.groups.include=smoke

Gradle

Open up the command prompt. Navigate to the folder where the Test Automation project is checked out using the cd command. Once at the folder, if these tests have been before, it’s best to clean out the results folder. Run the command:

gradle clean

Once that completes, run the following command to execute the tests:

gradle selenified -DappURL=google.com -Dbrowser=Firefox

To specify different groups of tests to run, instead of manipulating the TestNG xml file, you can provide an additional parameter, groups with the desired group to test

gradle selenified -Pgroups=virtual

Viewing Results

To view test results, navigate to the newly created output folder within the framework directory. This will be either target if run with Gradle or Maven, target-output if run through an IDE, or a custom directory if run with Ant. Navigate to the folder of the runner used to execute the tests, and locate the reports.html file. Open this file in a browser. This will give an overview of the tests run, showing the number of tests executed, passed, skipped and failed. Additionally each test is listed in a table, with high level information about it. Links to detailed reports are provided, for more information on each step run. If running through a build tool such as Gradle, Maven, or Ant, they will produce an additional reports file. Open the index.html file which will list all of the tests run. Clicking on the Reports link on the upper left frame, loads a frame with high level information about it. Links to detailed reports are provided, for more information on each step run. Clicking on each of these links will display a step by step procedure about what was run, in addition to details about the test. These steps and information are also very useful for debugging. They will alert if elements are missing, locators are bad, or anything else. Both locators and associated IDs are listed to make fixing tests or the app easier.

Additionally, a JUnit XML results file is produced. This is great for storing results/metrics within Jenkins, or other CI tools and tracking trends. Additionally, consider archiving testing results to go along with these trending results.

Packaging Results

If you'd like to zip up your test reports along with screenshots, include the 'packageResults' system property

mvn clean verify -Dbrowser=Firefox -DpackageResults

The zipped results will be placed in the same directory as the test results

PDF Test Reports

If you'd like to get test reports as PDF files instead of HTML for easier sharing, include the 'generatePDF' system property

mvn clean verify -Dbrowser=Firefox -DgeneratePDF

The PDF reports will be generated alongside the HTML reports

Installation

Building the jar

If you want to compile the jar from the source code, use maven. Maven can be used to run unit tests, run integration tests, build javadocs, and build the executable jar. To simply create the jar, run the below command

mvn clean package

To also run the integration tests, use the verify goal. Some of the integration tests require a physical browser to run, and so they can be run two different ways, the entire set with a browser, or a subset using HtmlUnit. Use the Jenkinsfile as a guide. Below is a good example

mvn clean verify
mvn clean verify -Dbrowser=chrome -Dfailsafe.groups.exclude=""

Known Issues

  • Safari through 10 doesn't properly handle alerts. These exceptions are caught and handled in the code, but will cause tests to fail. This is an Apple/Selenium issue, not specific to Selenified. Using version 11.0 onwards of Safari will alleviate this problem. https://github.com/SeleniumHQ/selenium-google-code-issue-archive/issues/3862
  • Safari through 10 can't navigate using forward or backward history functionality. These exceptions are caught and handled in the code, but will cause tests to fail. This is an Apple/Selenium issue, not specific to Selenified. Using version 11.0 onwards of Safari will alleviate this problem. https://github.com/seleniumhq/selenium-google-code-issue-archive/issues/3771
  • Unable to access, edit, or clear cookies in Edge as of version 18. These exceptions are caught and handled in the code, but may cause tests to fail, as cookies present are always returned as false. This is a Microsoft Edge and EdgeDriver issue, not specific to Selenified. https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-edge/platform/issues/14838528/
  • Safari 12 doesn't properly handle insecure (expired, invalid, bad, etc) ssl certificates. As a result, Safari gets stuck on the page indicating the certificate is invalid. There is currently no work around for this issue, other than installing a valid certificate for the site.
  • Chrome on Mac doesn't accept up/down keys in select dropdowns for navigation. Be cautious when trying to use Keys to manipulate selects

Skipping Tests

To handle some of these known issues, the ability to skip a test, based on the browser is provided. For example if a particular test includes html alerts, you might want to indicate to never run this test in Safari, as it will always fail. In this case, a standard group can be added to this test case, so that it is always skipped if Safari is the specified browser, but otherwise, always run.

    @Test(groups = { "no-safari" }, description = "Verified a pop-up alert is present - won't run properly in Safari")

All browsers are supported for this feature, simply prepend the browser name with no- in the group name.

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