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Update the definition of ceterms:inLanguage #549

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siuc-nate opened this Issue Oct 11, 2018 · 11 comments

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@siuc-nate

siuc-nate commented Oct 11, 2018

The current definition of ceterms:inLanguage reads:

This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

There are a few typos to correct here, namely:

This is the primary language of the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

The wording may also need revision. A suggestion from an advisory group member reads:

This is the primary language in which the credential is offered. The credential may make use of other languages (for example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students will also use Spanish) but inLanguage is the primary language used to convey the material.

However, we shouldn't constrain the definition to just credentials, since ceterms:inLanguage is used assessments and learning opportunities as well.

I think something like this may be more streamlined:

The primary language of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages. For example, a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English.

It may be worth moving the example portion of the definition to a comment, but I'm not sure how that gels with other definitions after the last major round of definition updates that @stuartasutton came up with.

@erafal10

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erafal10 commented Oct 11, 2018

Your suggestion makes sense to me.

@stuartasutton

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stuartasutton commented Oct 11, 2018

Yes, we softened when examples can be part of the definition where it helps the clarity of the definition. Doing so is a tradeoff since it is inherently problematic since properties end up needing to be used in places not originally imagined and sometimes the example text becomes limiting. This does not feel like such a case.

@siuc-nate

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siuc-nate commented Oct 16, 2018

Change to be made:
Remove:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Add:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: The primary language of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English.

@jkitchensSIUC @stuartasutton Please sign off on this.

@stuartasutton

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stuartasutton commented Oct 23, 2018

@stuartsutton signs off

@cwd-mparsons

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cwd-mparsons commented Oct 23, 2018

@stuartasutton At the risk of belaboring this issue, I want to clarify the meaning of 'The primary language of the entity'. The latter suggests that this is a single value. We started with a single value and then changed it to an array.
Should there ever be only one value for inLanguage?
If not, shouldn't the description convey the potential multiplicity?

@stuartasutton

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stuartasutton commented Oct 23, 2018

We have to key off whether this is "a language" of the resource or "the primary language" of the resource. Both make sense and are useful; however, as you note, "primary" points to a single, predominant language. I say we go with it as the definition suggests--single language with the possibility down the road of adding something like "secondaryLangauge" in the future should uses so dictate.

@siuc-nate

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siuc-nate commented Oct 24, 2018

I think it would be possible to have more than one primary language, albeit rare. Rather than worry about a second property, I think it's more practical to use a multi-value field and tweak the definition. Something like:

Remove:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Add:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: The primary language or languages of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English.

Perhaps we could add a comment or usage note to clarify further? That may be overkill.

@stuartasutton

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stuartasutton commented Oct 24, 2018

What about:

Object: The primary language or languages of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English while a credential in Quebec could have an inLanguage of both French and English.

@siuc-nate

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siuc-nate commented Oct 25, 2018

I like it.

Remove:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Add:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: The primary language or languages of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English, while a credential in Quebec could have an inLanguage of both French and English.

@siuc-nate

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siuc-nate commented Oct 25, 2018

Actually, I think we got our wires crossed somewhere - the text we've been discussing is currently the comment (as in, dct:description) for inLanguage, not the definition (as in, rdfs:comment).

The actual definition for inLanguage is:

Primary language of the credential, learning opportunity or assessment.

The comment is:

This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Should we make the changes above to the comment (dct:description) instead of the definition (rdfs:comment) instead? Or should we replace the definition completely and remove the comment?

In other words, which of the two is correct:

Remove:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: dct:description
Object: This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Add:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: dct:description
Object: The primary language or languages of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English, while a credential in Quebec could have an inLanguage of both French and English.

or:

Remove:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: Primary language of the credential, learning opportunity or assessment.

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: dct:description
Object: This is the primary language the entity, even if the it makes use of other languages. For example, a course that teaches Spanish to English-speaking students may primarily be in English, because that is the language used to convey the material.

Add:

Subject: ceterms:inLanguage
Predicate: rdfs:comment
Object: The primary language or languages of the entity, even if it makes use of other languages; e.g., a course offered in English to teach Spanish would have an inLanguage of English, while a credential in Quebec could have an inLanguage of both French and English.

@stuartasutton

@stuartasutton

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stuartasutton commented Oct 26, 2018

We should change the definition and drop the comment.

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