SliderNav is a JQuery plugin that lets you add dynamic, sliding content using a vertical navigation bar (index). It is made mainly for alphabetical listings but can be used with anything.
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README
example.html
jquery-1.4.2.js
slidernav-min.js
slidernav.css
slidernav.js

README

Plugin Name: SliderNav
Author: Monjurul Dolon, http://mdolon.com/
More Information: http://devgrow.com/slidernav

SliderNav is a JQuery plugin that lets you add dynamic, sliding content 
using a vertical navigation bar (index). It is made mainly for 
alphabetical listings but can be used with anything, though longer words 
can look a bit awkward. The plugin automatically adds the navigation and 
sets the height for the object based on how tall the navigation is, in 
order to make sure users have access to the entire list. I also used the 
overflow: auto; property for the actual content so you can use your 
mousewheel to scroll through the content as well.

The first of the configurations is height - set this to a pixel value if 
you wish to override the automatic detection based on the vertical 
navigation (you may need to change the min-height in the CSS too). Also 
by default, the plugin will generate an alphabetical navigation that 
uses all 26 letters of the English alphabet, however you can also use 
custom items using the following code:

    $('#slider').sliderNav({items:['item1','item2','item3'], height:'200'});

You can also set arrows to true (default) or false, which displays 
arrows above and below the slider object to allow scrolling longer 
sections. Click on an arrow will scroll the object by it’s height 
– I used this method to keep code to the minimum, as anything 
smoother/nicer-looking required a lot more code. The last customizable 
option is debug, which can either be true or false. This adds a little 
bit of text on the bottom of the slider that shows how many pixels the 
current offset is (was useful during early development, probably not 
anymore).