Perl utility scripts for use with Evergreen-ILS.
Perl
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sql
README

README

This repository contains some handy utility scripts for use with
Evergreen.  They are written against master and kept relatively up to
date with changes there.  They may work with earlier releases of
Evergreen, but we make no guarantees.  In many cases they will need
extensive modifications to work with anything but the most recent
releases or master.

They come with no documentation (other than the comments in the code)
and absolutely no warranty of any kind whatsoever.  You use these at
your own risk, and you assume full responsibility for whatever happens
if you run these including but not limited to nuclear apocalypse.

Several of the Perl scripts use a custom JSONPrefs module in order to
load settings or login information for Evergreen.  This module is
available at:

     https://github.com/Dyrcona/JSONPrefs

These scripts generally look for preferences files in a myprefs.d
subdirectory of the current user's home.  The most common such file is
expected to be named evergreen.json and to contain a JSON object with
fields containing login credentials for Evergreen.  Here is a sample
of what that might look like:

     {
          "username" : "eguser",
          "password" : "egpassword",
          "workstation" : "egworkstation",
          "type" : "staff"
     }

You, of course, replace eguser, egpassword, and egworkstation with the
credentials appropriate to your system.

The Perl scripts that use the DBI module need to have the PG database
environment variables setup properly.  If you can connect to the
database you want simply by typing psql at the command line, then you
are good to go.  If not, you need to read this:
http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/libpq-envars.html and set
your environment up appropriately.

The scripts in the sql subdirectory are SQL scripts that you can run
however you need to.  Most of them take arguments of some kind, so
read the scripts before running them to see what you need to do.