AuthenticatedSmtpUsingPamAndPasswords

John Zaitseff edited this page Jun 22, 2018 · 3 revisions

Athenticated SMTP using either PAM and/or Passwords

Introduction

You may be faced with a situation in which you would like to use PAM for SMTP authentication, but with the possibility of passwords in a local file, say /etc/exim4/passwd, overriding those in PAM. In other words, the goal is to have the following:

  • Check if the user ID exists, along with a password, in /etc/exim4/passwd
  • If so, use the password in /etc/exim4/passwd to authenticate
  • If not (or if /etc/exim4/passwd does not exist), use PAM to authenticate.

This document shows you how to do this.

Configuring Exim

You need to configure and build Exim 4 to support PAM for this configuration to work. See the page on Authenticated SMTP using PAM for more details. On Debian GNU/Linux, this is as simple as installing Exim 4; you most likely need the exim4-daemon-heavy package. You also need to add the Debian-exim user into the shadow group, so as to give Exim access to /etc/shadow via PAM.

In the configuration file, typically /etc/exim4/exim4.conf or similar, make sure authentication is only enabled on an encrypted connection. This is due to the fact that passwords would otherwise be sent in clear text:

auth_advertise_hosts = ${if eq{$tls_cipher}{}{false}{true}}

Naturally, you will need to set up an appropriate encryption certificate. For example:

tls_advertise_hosts = *
tls_certificate     = /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem
tls_privatekey      = /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/privkey.pem

In this case, /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem contains the certificate for SMTP, signed by LetsEncrypt, including the full chain of certificates as needed. The file /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/privkey.pem contains the private key; it must be readable by Exim (typically by making it group-readable by the Debian-exim group, on Debian systems). You should also investigate using the tls_dhparam configuration option to avoid using common primes.

Finally, add the following authenticators:

begin authenticators

#########################################################################
plain_server:

  # This authenticator implements the PLAIN authentication mechanism
  # (RFC2595).  Since the password is transmitted essentially as clear
  # text, a user can only authenticate if the session is encrypted using
  # TLS.  The user name and password is first checked against
  # /etc/exim4/passwd, then against the system database using PAM (in
  # that order).

  driver                     = plaintext
  public_name                = PLAIN
  server_advertise_condition = ${if eq{$tls_cipher}{}{false}{true}}
  server_prompts             = :
  server_set_id              = $auth2

  server_condition           = "\
        ${if exists{CONFDIR/passwd}\
          {${lookup{$auth2}lsearch{CONFDIR/passwd}\
            {${if crypteq{$auth3}{${extract{1}{:}{$value}{$value}fail}}\
              {true}{false} }}\
            {${if pam{$auth2:${sg{$auth3}{:}{::}} }\
              {true}{false}} } }}\
          {${if pam{$auth2:${sg{$auth3}{:}{::}} }\
            {true}{false}} }}"

#########################################################################
login_server:

  # This authenticator implements the LOGIN authentication mechanism.
  # Since the password is transmitted essentially as clear text, a user
  # can only authenticate if the session is encrypted using TLS.  The
  # user name and password is first checked against /etc/exim4/passwd,
  # then against the system database using PAM (in that order).

  driver                     = plaintext
  public_name                = LOGIN
  server_advertise_condition = ${if eq{$tls_cipher}{}{false}{true}}
  server_prompts             = Username:: : Password::
  server_set_id              = $auth1
  server_condition           = "\
        ${if exists{CONFDIR/passwd}\
          {${lookup{$1}lsearch{CONFDIR/passwd}\
            {${if crypteq{$auth2}{${extract{1}{:}{$value}{$value}fail}}\
              {true}{false} }}\
            {${if pam{$auth1:${sg{$auth2}{:}{::}} }\
              {true}{false}} } }}\
          {${if pam{$auth1:${sg{$auth2}{:}{::}} }\
            {true}{false}} }}"

CONFDIR is assumed to be a macro pointing to the configuration directory. In other words, something like the following should appear in the Exim configuration file:

CONFDIR = /etc/exim4

Configuring /etc/exim4/passwd

You need to create an appropriate password file to use with these authenticators. You might like to use the following as a template:

#########################################################################
#    /etc/exim4/passwd: Client Passwords for Mail Submission to Exim    #
#########################################################################

# This file allows a user to authenticate a mail submission to the Exim
# MTA without using their system password (found in /etc/shadow).
#
# Each line of this file should contain a "user:password:comment" field,
# where the password is encrypted and encoded using standard crypt(3)
# functions--the same format as is used in /etc/shadow.  You can disable
# a user from ever sending (authenticated) messages by using "*" as the
# password.
#
# You can use the following command line to generate the password:
#
#  mkpasswd -m sha-512 'password'
#
# (replace "password" with your password, of course).

####################
#   System users   #
####################

root:*:

###################
#   Local users   #
###################

#test:$6$VyTxt8CLk28oO576$.Og/ufsD5YLa57tpSS5Bm6y/brXLzt7mTXMP3mGmRpGgFs/MDfRhG7CIZlqoQ8aThkAV.ZfsFgYrjL1xvizgA/:Test#Password#01a

The easiest way to generate a password is to use the standard mkpasswd program available on most Linux systems (as part of the whois package on Debian and Ubuntu):

mkpasswd -m sha-512 'password'

Simply replace password with your password.

Conclusion

This document showed you how to consult both a password file and the PAM system password databases, in that order, for authenticated SMTP. The main reason for writing this document is the number of hours the author spent debugging the authenticators before discovering (a) the -d+expand command line argument and (b) the need for \\\{md5\\\} instead of \{md5\} in the crypteq function (as used in a previous version of this document)! -- JohnZaitseff


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