Queuer is a queue manager, built on top of OperationQueue and Dispatch (aka GCD).
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README.md

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FeaturesRequirementsInstallingUsageDocumentationChangelogCommunicationContributingAuthorLicense


Features

Queuer is a queue manager, built on top of OperationQueue and Dispatch (aka GCD).
It allows you to create any asynchronous and synchronous task easily, all managed by a queue, with just a few lines.

Here is the list of all the features:

  • Works on all Swift compatible platforms (even Linux)
  • Easy to use
  • Well documented (100% documented)
  • Well tested (100% of code coverage)
  • Create an operation block
  • Create a single operation
  • Create chained operations
  • Manage a centralized queue
  • Create unlimited queue
  • Declare how many concurrent operation a queue can handle
  • Create semaphores
  • Create and handle schedules
  • Automatically or manually retry an operation
  • Ability to restore uncompleted operations
  • Improve the state restoration feature
  • Throttling between each automatic operation retry
  • Data layer that every operation inside an operation queue can access

Requirements

Swift Xcode Queuer iOS macOS tvOS watchOS Linux
3.1...3.2 8.3...9.0 1.0.0...1.1.0 8.0+ 10.10+ 9.0+ 2.0+ ✓
4.0 9.0...9.2 1.3.0 8.0+ 10.10+ 9.0+ 2.0+ ✓
4.1 9.3...9.4 1.3.1...1.3.2 8.0+ 10.10+ 9.0+ 2.0+ ✓
4.2 10.0...10.1 2.0.0 8.0+ 10.10+ 9.0+ 3.0+ ✓

Installing

See Requirements section to check Swift, Xcode, Queuer and OS versions.

Manual

  • Open and build the framework from the project (Queuer.xcodeproj)
  • Import Queuer.framework into your project
  • Import the framework with import Queuer
  • Enjoy!

CocoaPods

  • Create a Podfile in your project directory and write into:

    platform :ios, '8.0'
    xcodeproj 'Project.xcodeproj'
    use_frameworks!
    
    pod 'Queuer'
  • Change "Project" with your real project name

  • Open Terminal, go to your project directory and type: pod install

  • Import the framework with import Queuer

  • Enjoy!

Carthage

  • Create a Cartfile in your project directory and write into:

    github "FabrizioBrancati/Queuer"
  • Open Terminal, go to project directory and type: carthage update

  • Include the created Framework in your project

  • Add Build Phase with the following contents:

    /usr/local/bin/carthage copy-frameworks

    Add the paths to the Queuer framework under Input Files

    $(SRCROOT)/Carthage/Build/iOS/Queuer.framework

    Add the paths to the copied frameworks to the Output Files

    $(BUILT_PRODUCTS_DIR)/$(FRAMEWORKS_FOLDER_PATH)/Queuer.framework

    This script works around an App Store submission bug triggered by universal binaries and ensures that necessary bitcode-related files are copied when archiving

  • (Optional) Add Build Phase with the following contents

    /usr/local/bin/carthage outdated --xcode-warnings

    To automatically warn you when one of your dependencies is out of date

  • Import the framework with import Queuer

  • Enjoy!

Swift Package Manager

  • Create a Package.swift file in your project directory and write into:

    // swift-tools-version:4.2
    import PackageDescription
    
    let package = Package(
        name: "Project",
        products: [
            .executable(name: "Project", targets: ["Project"])
        ],
        dependencies: [
            .package(url: "https://github.com/FabrizioBrancati/Queuer.git", .upToNextMajor(from: "2.0.0"))
        ],
        targets: [
            .target(name: "Project", dependencies: ["Queuer"])
        ]
    )
  • Change "Project" with your real project name

  • Open Terminal, go to project directory and type: swift build

  • Import the framework with import Queuer

  • Enjoy!

Usage

Shared Queuer

Queuer.shared.addOperation(operation)

Custom Queue

let queue = Queuer(name: "MyCustomQueue")

You can even create a queue by defining the maxConcurrentOperationCount and the qualityOfService properties:

let queue = Queuer(name: "MyCustomQueue", maxConcurrentOperationCount: Int.max, qualityOfService: .default)

Create an Operation Block

You have three methods to add an Operation block:

  • Directly on the queue(or Queuer.shared):

    queue.addOperation {
        /// Your task here
    }
  • Creating a ConcurrentOperation with a block:

    let concurrentOperation = ConcurrentOperation { _ in
        /// Your task here
    }
    queue.addOperation(concurrentOperation)
  • Creating a SynchronousOperation with a block:

    let synchronousOperation = SynchronousOperation { _ in
        /// Your task here
    }
    queue.addOperation(concurrentOperation)

We will see how ConcurrentOperation and SynchronousOperation works later.

Chained Operations

Chained Operations are Operations that add a dependency each other.
They follow the given array order, for example: [A, B, C] = A -> B -> C -> completionBlock.

let concurrentOperation1 = ConcurrentOperation { _ in
    /// Your task 1 here
}
let concurrentOperation2 = ConcurrentOperation { _ in
    /// Your task 2 here
}
queue.addChainedOperations([concurrentOperation1, concurrentOperation2]) {
    /// Your completion task here
}

You can also add a completionHandler after the queue creation with:

queue.addCompletionHandler {
    /* Your completion task here */
}

Queue States

  • Cancel all Operations in queue:

    queue.cancelAll()
  • Pause queue:

    queue.pause()

    By calling pause() you will not be sure that every Operation will be paused.
    If the Operation is already started it will not be on pause until it's a custom Operation that overrides pause() function.

  • Resume queue:

    queue.resume()

    To have a complete pause and resume states you must create a custom Operation that overrides pause() and resume() function.

  • Wait until all Operations are finished:

    queue.waitUntilAllOperationsAreFinished()

    This function means that the queue will blocks the current thread until all Operations are finished.

Asynchronous Operation

ConcurrentOperation is a class created to be subclassed. It allows synchronous and asynchronous tasks, has a pause and resume states, can be easily added to a queue and can be created with a block.

You can create your custom ConcurrentOperation by subclassing it.
You must override execute() function and call the finish() function inside it, when the task has finished its job to notify the queue.

For convenience it has an init function with a completion block:

let concurrentOperation = ConcurrentOperation { _ in
    /// Your task here
}
concurrentOperation.addToQueue(queue)

Synchronous Operation

There are three methods to create synchronous tasks or even queue:

  • Setting maxConcurrentOperationCount of the queue to 1.
    By setting that property to 1 you will be sure that only one task at time will be executed.
  • Using a Semaphore and waiting until a task has finished its job.
  • Using a SynchronousOperation.
    It's a subclass of ConcurrentOperation that handles synchronous tasks.
    It's not awesome as it seems to be and is always better to create an asynchronous task, but some times it may be useful.

For convenience it has an init function with a completion block:

let synchronousOperation = SynchronousOperation { _ in
  /// Your task here
}
synchronousOperation.addToQueue(queue)

Automatically Retry an Operation

An Operation is passed to every closure, with it you can set and handle the retry feature.
By default the retry feature is disabled, to enable it simply set the hasFailed property to true. With hasFailed to true the Operation will retry until reaches maximumRetries property value. To let the Operation know when everything is ok, you must set hasFailed to false.
With currentAttempt you can know at which attempt the Operation is.

let concurrentOperation = ConcurrentOperation { operation in
    /// Your task here
    if /* Failing */ {
      operation.hasFailed = true
    } else {
      operation.hasFailed = false
    }
}

Manually Retry an Operation

You can manually retry an Operation when you think that the execution will be successful.
An Operation is passed to every closure, with it you can set and handle the retry feature.
By default the manual retry feature is disabled, to enable it simply set the manualRetry property to true, you must do this outside of the execution closure. You must also set hasFailed to true or false to let the Operation know when is everything ok, like the automatic retry feature.
To let the Operation retry your execution closure, you have to call the retry() function. If the retry() is not called, you may block the entire queue. Be sure to call it at least maximumRetries times, it is not a problem if you call retry() more times than is needed, your execution closure will not be executed more times than the maximumRetries value.

let concurrentOperation = ConcurrentOperation { operation in
    /// Your task here
    if /* Failing */ {
      operation.hasFailed = true
    } else {
      operation.hasFailed = false
    }
}
concurrentOperation.manualRetry = true
/// Later on your code
concurrentOperation.retry()

Scheduler

A Scheduler is a struct that uses the GDC's DispatchSourceTimer to create a timer that can execute functions with a specified interval and quality of service.

let schedule = Scheduler(deadline: .now(), repeating: .seconds(1)) {
    /// Your task here
}

You can even create a Scheduler without the handler and set it later:

var schedule = Scheduler(deadline: .now(), repeating: .seconds(1))
schedule.setHandler {
    /// Your task here.
}

With timer property you can access to all DispatchSourceTimer properties and functions, like cancel():

schedule.timer.cancel()

Semaphore

A Semaphore is a struct that uses the GCD's DispatchSemaphore to create a semaphore on the function and wait until it finish its job.
I recommend you to use a defer { semaphore.continue() } right after the Semaphore creation and wait() call.

let semaphore = Semaphore()
semaphore.wait()
defer { semaphore.continue() }
/// Your task here

You can even set a custom timeout, default is .distantFuture:

semaphore.wait(DispatchTime(uptimeNanoseconds: 1_000_000_000))

It's more useful if used inside an asynchronous task:

let concurrentOperation = ConcurrentOperation {
    /// Your task here
    semaphore.continue()
}
concurrentOperation.addToQueue(queue)
semaphore.wait()

Queue State Restoration (Beta)

To enable the Queue Restoration feature you must use ConcurrentOperation with a unique (non-nil) name property. Currently this feature allows you to save the current state (OperationStates) of your queue, like: name, progress and dependencies.
The progress property allows to save the current state of the Operation progress. Update it constantly during the Operation execution.
Call Queuer.state(of: OperationQueue) or operationQueue.state() to get the QueueStateList aka: Array of OperationStates.
It's up to you save and retrieve this list, and create the queue correctly.

Documentation

Jazzy Generated Documentation - 100% Documented

Changelog

To see what has changed in recent versions of Queuer, see the CHANGELOG.md file.

Communication

  • If you need help, open an issue.
  • If you found a bug, open an issue.
  • If you have a feature request, open an issue.
  • If you want to contribute, see Contributing section.

Contributing

See CONTRIBUTING.md file.

Author

Fabrizio Brancati

Website: https://www.fabriziobrancati.com
Email: fabrizio.brancati@gmail.com

License

Queuer is available under the MIT license. See the LICENSE file for more info.