Contains the source code of a set of software applications. The set of software applications enables users to conduct math analyses of card games belonging to the Blackjack family. The set of software applications also enables the user to conduct high speed game simulations of card games belonging to the Blackjack family.
Switch branches/tags
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
BJ282.BAS
README.md
ULTIMA221.BAS
ULTIMA282.BAS
ULTIMA283.BAS
ULTIMA284.BAS
ULTIMA293.BAS
ULTIMA297.BAS
ULTIMA298.BAS
ULTIMA299.BAS

README.md

SourceCode

In this repository, I disclose the source code for a set of software applications. I wrote the set of software applications in a basic programming language known as QB64. In this README.md file, I do the following. Describe the hardware and software required to use the set of software applications. Recommend a procedure for aquiring and using the QB64 complier to assemble the source code into object code.

Hardware and Software Required to Use the Various Software Applications

To use each of the various software applications, users will need a general-purpose computer capable of executing software instructions including a hard drive, a motherboard with a central processing unit, at least one gigabyte of RAM, a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse. Users must format the hard drive of the general-purpose computer using an operating system selected from a group consisting of the Microsoft Windows operating system and the Mac OS X operating system. Users must install the operating system on the hard drive. Subsequently, the users must load the source codes of the various software applications on to the hard drive of the general purpose computer.

Subsequently, the user must compile the source code of the software applications into object code. The user can do so using QB64. QB64 is a self-hosting BASIC compiler. QB64 runs on a general-purpose computer with the Microsoft Windows operating system installed on the hard drive. Alternatively, QB64 runs on a general-purpose computer with the Mac OS X operating system installed on the hard drive. Rob Galleon of Sidney Australia developed QB64 to be compatible with the Microsoft QBasic and QuickBASIC programming languages. QB64 is a C++ emitter integrated with a C++ compiler to provide compilation via C++ code and GCC optimization.

In order to obtain a copy of the QB64 compiler, users must install any compatible Internet browser on the hard drive. Users must use the Internet browser and an Internet connection to do the following. Do a search on the Internet using the search term "QB64". Find the QB64 website. Download a copy of the QB64 compiler that corresponds to the operating system installed on the hard drive. Install the QB64 compiler. Once installed on the hard drive of the general purpose computer, it is possible to use the QB64 compiler to compile the source code of each of the various software applications into object code.

Recommended Procedure for Acquiring and Using the Qb64 Compiler

The following describes the recommended procedure for acquiring and using the QB64 compiler to compile the source code of each of the various software applications into object code. A directory or folder is a location on a disk drive for storing information about files. The terms directory and folder are interchangeable. A directory tree is a hierarchy of directories consisting of a single directory called a root directory and all levels of sub-directories. A diagram (not shown) of a directory tree resembles an inverted tree, or a branch thereof, usually with a series of directories branching off from a single directory, more directories branching off from some or all of them, etc. Virtually all modern computer operating systems use directory trees for organizing files.

Upon installation, modern operating systems automatically build a directory tree on the hard drive. A sub-directory containing application files, typically though not necessarily, branches off from the directory tree. If the Microsoft Windows operating system built the directory tree on the hard drive, then the sub-directory containing applications is named "programs". If the Mac OS X operating system built the directory tree on the hard drive, then the sub-directory containing applications is named "applications".

Start by using the operating system installed on the hard drive to do the following. Find the sub-directory containing applications. Make a new folder named "QB64" inside of the sub-directory. Inside of the folder named "QB64" make another new folder. Name the new folder "Source code". Put the text files containing the source codes of the various software applications into the folder.

Next, use an Internet connection to get on the Internet. Use any compatible Internet browser to do the following. Search for, find, and go to the QB64 website. Locate and go to their download page. Locate the link enabling the user to download a zip file containing the set of files required to run the QB64 compiler, click on the link, and download the zip file containing the set of files required to run the QB64 compiler. Put the zip file into the folder named "QB64" and unzip the contents.

If the user unzips the zip file on a general-purpose computer with the Microsoft Windows operating system installed on the hard drive, then afterward an icon representing an application named "qb64" will appear inside of the folder named "QB64". Find the icon. Click on the icon to start the application. The user will see a window open up. This is the console style graphic user interface provided by the QB64 compiler.

If the user unzips the zip file on a general-purpose computer with the Mac OS X operating system installed on the hard drive, then afterward two icons will appear in the folder named "QB64". A first of the two icons is labeled "qb64". A second of the two icons is labeled qb64_start.command. Find the second icon of the two icons. Click on the second of the two icons to start the application. The user will see a window open up. This is the console style graphic user interface provided by the QB64 compiler.

Across the top of the window, the user will see a menu of options. Click on the menu option named file. A sub menu will open up. Click on the word "open" in the sub menu. A sub window will open up. Inside of the sub window two columns will appear. The word files appears as a label at the top of a left column. The column to the left displays the names of all files named with a .BAS extension. The word paths appears as a label at the top of a right column. The column to the right displays the names of all folders located within the folder named QB64. At the bottom of the sub window, the phrase ".BAS only" appears. To the left of the phrase is a capital letter x enclosed in square brackets. This is a button. Click on this button one time so that the button looks like a space enclosed in square brackets. Doing so will enable the QB64 compiler to display the names of all of the files including text files.

Click on the folder named "Source code" and the qb64 application will display the names of a list of the files contained in the folder named "Source code". The files contain the source codes of the various software applications. Click on the file name at the top of the list. The qb64 compiler will load the source code of contained in that file into program memory, and the sub window will close.

Click on the menu option named "Run" and a sub menu will open. Click on the sub menu option "start" and the "qb64" application will compile the source code of the software application into object code. The object code takes the form of an executable application written in C++.

If the user compiles the source code of the software application into object code on a general-purpose computer with the Windows operating system installed on the hard drive, then an icon bearing the file name will appear in the folder named QB64. If the user intends to use the software application on a general-purpose computer with the Windows operating system installed on the hard drive, then click on the icon to start the executable application.

If the user compiles the source code of the software application into object code on a general-purpose computer with the Mac OS X operating system installed on the hard drive, then two icons will appear in the folder named QB64. One icon bears the file name minus the file name extension. For example, if the file name is BJ282.BAS, then the one icon bears the name BJ282. The other icon bears the file name minus the file name extension plus the characters "_start.command". For example, if the file name is BJ282.BAS, then the other icon bears the name BJ282_start.command. If the user intends to use the software application on a general-purpose computer with the Mac OS X operating system installed on the hard drive, then click on the icon labeled with the phrase "_start.command" to start the executable application.

Repeat as necessary to compile the source code of each of the software applications into object code. When finished, a set of icons representing the various software applications will appear in the folder named "qb64". The various software applications do not require the presence of the "qb64" compiler to function. As long as the set of dynamic link libraries accompanying the "qb64" compiler are stored in the same folder as the applications, each application in the set will be capable of operating as a stand-alone executable application.