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Contributing to FlutterFire

all_plugins GitHub Workflow Status

See also: Flutter's code of conduct

1. Things you will need

2. Forking & cloning the repository

  • Ensure all the dependencies described in the previous section are installed.
  • Fork https://github.com/FirebaseExtended/flutterfire into your own GitHub account. If you already have a fork, and are now installing a development environment on a new machine, make sure you've updated your fork so that you don't use stale configuration options from long ago.
  • If you haven't configured your machine with an SSH key that's known to github, then follow GitHub's directions to generate an SSH key.
  • git clone git@github.com:<your_name_here>/flutterfire.git
  • git remote add upstream git@github.com:FirebaseExtended/flutterfire.git (So that you fetch from the master repository, not your clone, when running git fetch et al.)

3. Environment Setup

FlutterFire uses Melos to manage the project and dependencies.

To install Melos, run the following command from your SSH client:

pub global activate melos

Next, at the root of your locally cloned repository bootstrap the projects dependencies:

melos bootstrap

The bootstrap command locally links all dependencies within the project without having to provide manual dependency_overrides. This allows all plugins, examples and tests to build from the local clone project.

You do not need to run flutter pub get once bootstrap has been completed.

4. Running an example

Each plugin provides an example app which aims to showcase the main use-cases of each plugin.

To run an example, run the flutter run command from the example directory of each plugins main directory. For example, for Firebase Auth example:

cd packages/firebase_auth/firebase_auth/example
flutter run

Using Melos (installed in step 3), any changes made to the plugins locally will also be reflected within all example applications code automatically.

4. Running tests

FlutterFire comprises of a number of tests for each plugin, either end-to-end (e2e) or unit tests.

Unit tests

Unit tests are responsible for ensuring expected behavior whilst developing the plugins Dart code. Unit tests do not interact with 3rd party Firebase services, and mock where possible. To run unit tests for a specific plugin, run the flutter test command from the plugins root directory. For example, Firebase Auth platform interface tests can be run with the following commands:

cd packages/firebase_auth/firebase_auth_platform_interface
flutter test

End-to-end (e2e) tests

E2e tests are those which directly communicate with Firebase, whose results cannot be mocked. These tests run directly from an example application. To run e2e tests, run the flutter drive command from the plugins main example directory, targeting the entry e2e test file.

Some packages use Firebase Emulator Suite to run tests. To learn more, visit the official documentation.

cd packages/firebase_auth/firebase_auth/example
flutter drive --target=./test_driver/firebase_auth_e2e.dart

To run tests against web environments, run the command as a release build:

cd packages/firebase_auth/firebase_auth/example
flutter drive --target=./test_driver/firebase_auth_e2e.dart --release -d chrome

Using Melos

To help aid developer workflow, Melos provides a number of commands to quickly run tests against plugins. For example, to run all e2e tests across all plugins at once, run the following command from the root of your cloned repository:

melos run test:e2e

A full list of all commands can be found within the melos.yaml file.

5. Contributing code

We gladly accept contributions via GitHub pull requests.

Please peruse the Flutter style guide and design principles before working on anything non-trivial. These guidelines are intended to keep the code consistent and avoid common pitfalls.

To start working on a patch:

  1. git fetch upstream
  2. git checkout upstream/master -b <name_of_your_branch>
  3. Hack away!

Once you have made your changes, ensure that it passes the internal analyzer & formatting checks. The following commands can be run locally to highlight any issues before committing your code:

# Run the analyze check
melos run analyze

# Format code
melos run format

Assuming all is successful, commit and push your code:

  1. git commit -a -m "<your informative commit message>"
  2. git push origin <name_of_your_branch>

To send us a pull request:

  • git pull-request (if you are using Hub) or go to https://github.com/FirebaseExtended/flutterfire and click the "Compare & pull request" button

Please make sure all your check-ins have detailed commit messages explaining the patch.

When naming the title of your pull request, please follow the Conventional Commits guide. For example, for a fix to the Firebase Auth plugin:

fix(firebase_auth): fixed a bug!

Plugins tests are run automatically on contributions using GitHub Actions. Depending on your code contributions, various tests will be run against your updated code automatically.

Once you've gotten an LGTM from a project maintainer and once your PR has received the green light from all our automated testing, wait for one the package maintainers to merge the pull request.

You must complete the Contributor License Agreement. You can do this online, and it only takes a minute. If you've never submitted code before, you must add your (or your organization's) name and contact info to the AUTHORS file.

The review process

Newly opened PRs first go through initial triage which results in one of:

  • Merging the PR - if the PR can be quickly reviewed and looks good.
  • Closing the PR - if the PR maintainer decides that the PR should not be merged.
  • Moving the PR to the backlog - if the review requires non trivial effort and the issue isn't a priority; in this case the maintainer will:
    • Make sure that the PR has an associated issue labeled with "plugin".
    • Add the "backlog" label to the issue.
    • Leave a comment on the PR explaining that the review is not trivial and that the issue will be looked at according to priority order.
  • Starting a non trivial review - if the review requires non trivial effort and the issue is a priority; in this case the maintainer will:
    • Add the "in review" label to the issue.
    • Self assign the PR.

The release process

We push releases manually, using Melos to take care of the hard work.

Changelogs and version updates are automatically updated by a project maintainer (via Melos). The new version is automatically generated via the commit types and changelogs via the commit messages.

Some things to keep in mind before publishing the release:

  • Has CI ran on the master commit and gone green? Even if CI shows as green on the PR it's still possible for it to fail on merge, for multiple reasons. There may have been some bug in the merge that introduced new failures. CI runs on PRs as it's configured on their branch state, and not on tip of tree. CI on PRs also only runs tests for packages that it detects have been directly changed, vs running on every single package on master.
  • Publishing is forever. Hopefully any bugs or breaking in changes in this PR have already been caught in PR review, but now's a second chance to revert before anything goes live.
  • "Don't deploy on a Friday." Consider carefully whether or not it's worth immediately publishing an update before a stretch of time where you're going to be unavailable. There may be bugs with the release or questions about it from people that immediately adopt it, and uncovering and resolving those support issues will take more time if you're unavailable.

Run a release...

...with automatically generated change logs

  1. Switch to master branch locally.
  2. Run 'git pull origin master'.
  3. Run git fetch --all to make sure all tags and commits are fetched.
  4. Run melos version. This will auto commit, update the changelogs using git commit messages from the last release, and also tag the release for versioning.
  5. Run git push --follow-tags to push the auto commits and tags to the remote repository.
  6. Run melos publish to dry run and confirm all packages are publishable.
  7. Run melos publish --no-dry-run to now publish to Pub.dev.
  8. Update the documentation by manually triggering the publish docs workflow; image

...with manual change log edits

To run a release and manually edit the change log, do the following steps:

  1. Switch to master branch locally.
  2. Run 'git pull origin master'.
  3. Run git fetch --all to make sure all tags and commits are fetched.
  4. Run melos version --no-git-tag-version. This will skip auto commiting and git tagging, leaving your git tree dirty with version bumps and changelog entry changes.
  5. Update the CHANGELOG.md files that you manually want to edit/reword.
  6. Add and commit all the CHANGELOG.md and pubspec.yaml files that were modified by melos version (using the standard release commit message, e.g. chore(release): publish packages).
  7. melos publish to dry run and confirm all packages are publishable.
  8. melos publish --no-dry-run --git-tag-version to now publish to Pub.dev (--git-tag-version will add missing git tags since we skipped tagging in step 1).
  9. Push your changes to master; git push --follow-tags. 10)Update the documentation by manually triggering the publish docs workflow; image

Graduate packages

Sometimes you may need to 'graduate' a package from a 'dev' or 'beta' (versions tagged like this: 0.10.0-dev.4) to a stable version. Melos can also be used to graduate multiple packages using the following steps:

  1. Switch to master branch locally.
  2. Run 'git pull origin master'.
  3. Run git fetch --all to make sure all tags and commits are fetched.
  4. Run melos version --graduate to prompt a list of all packages to be graduated (You may also specifically select packages using the scope flag like this: --scope="*firestore*")
  5. Run git push --follow-tags to push the auto commits and tags to the remote repository.
  6. Run melos publish to dry run and confirm all packages are publishable.
  7. Run melos publish --no-dry-run to now publish to Pub.dev.