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# -*- text -*-
##
## radiusd.conf -- FreeRADIUS server configuration file - @RADIUSD_VERSION_STRING@
##
## http://www.freeradius.org/
## $Id$
##
######################################################################
#
# The format of this (and other) configuration file is
# documented in "man unlang". There are also READMEs in many
# subdirectories:
#
# raddb/README.rst
# How to upgrade from v2.
#
# raddb/mods-available/README.rst
# How to use mods-available / mods-enabled.
# All of the modules are in individual files,
# along with configuration items and full documentation.
#
# raddb/sites-available/README
# virtual servers, "listen" sections, clients, etc.
# The "sites-available" directory contains many
# worked examples of common configurations.
#
# raddb/certs/README
# How to create certificates for EAP or RadSec.
#
# Every configuration item in the server is documented
# extensively in the comments in the example configuration
# files.
#
# Before editing this (or any other) configuration file, PLEASE
# read "man radiusd". See the section titled DEBUGGING. It
# outlines a method where you can quickly create the
# configuration you want, with minimal effort.
#
# Run the server in debugging mode, and READ the output.
#
# $ radiusd -X
#
# We cannot emphasize this point strongly enough. The vast
# majority of problems can be solved by carefully reading the
# debugging output, which includes warnings about common issues,
# and suggestions for how they may be fixed.
#
# There may be a lot of output, but look carefully for words like:
# "warning", "error", "reject", or "failure". The messages there
# will usually be enough to guide you to a solution.
#
# More documentation on "radiusd -X" is available on the wiki:
# https://wiki.freeradius.org/radiusd-X
#
# If you are going to ask a question on the mailing list, then
# explain what you are trying to do, and include the output from
# debugging mode (radiusd -X). Failure to do so means that all
# of the responses to your question will be people telling you
# to "post the output of radiusd -X".
#
# Guidelines for posting to the mailing list are on the wiki:
# https://wiki.freeradius.org/list-help
#
# Please read those guidelines before posting to the list.
#
# Further documentation is available in the "doc" directory
# of the server distribution, or on the wiki at:
# https://wiki.freeradius.org/
#
# New users to RADIUS should read the Technical Guide. That guide
# explains how RADIUS works, how FreeRADIUS works, and what each
# part of a RADIUS system does. It is not just "configure FreeRADIUS"!
# https://networkradius.com/doc/FreeRADIUS-Technical-Guide.pdf
#
# More documentation on dictionaries, modules, unlang, etc. is also
# available on the Network RADIUS web site:
# https://networkradius.com/freeradius-documentation/
#
######################################################################
prefix = @prefix@
exec_prefix = @exec_prefix@
sysconfdir = @sysconfdir@
localstatedir = @localstatedir@
sbindir = @sbindir@
logdir = @logdir@
raddbdir = @raddbdir@
radacctdir = @radacctdir@
#
# name of the running server. See also the "-n" command-line option.
name = radiusd
# Location of config and logfiles.
confdir = ${raddbdir}
modconfdir = ${confdir}/mods-config
certdir = ${confdir}/certs
cadir = ${confdir}/certs
run_dir = ${localstatedir}/run/${name}
# Should likely be ${localstatedir}/lib/radiusd
db_dir = ${raddbdir}
#
# libdir: Where to find the rlm_* modules.
#
# This should be automatically set at configuration time.
#
# If the server builds and installs, but fails at execution time
# with an 'undefined symbol' error, then you can use the libdir
# directive to work around the problem.
#
# The cause is usually that a library has been installed on your
# system in a place where the dynamic linker CANNOT find it. When
# executing as root (or another user), your personal environment MAY
# be set up to allow the dynamic linker to find the library. When
# executing as a daemon, FreeRADIUS MAY NOT have the same
# personalized configuration.
#
# To work around the problem, find out which library contains that symbol,
# and add the directory containing that library to the end of 'libdir',
# with a colon separating the directory names. NO spaces are allowed.
#
# e.g. libdir = /usr/local/lib:/opt/package/lib
#
# You can also try setting the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable
# in a script which starts the server.
#
# If that does not work, then you can re-configure and re-build the
# server to NOT use shared libraries, via:
#
# ./configure --disable-shared
# make
# make install
#
libdir = @libdir@
# pidfile: Where to place the PID of the RADIUS server.
#
# The server may be signalled while it's running by using this
# file.
#
# This file is written when ONLY running in daemon mode.
#
# e.g.: kill -HUP `cat /var/run/radiusd/radiusd.pid`
#
pidfile = ${run_dir}/${name}.pid
#
# correct_escapes: use correct backslash escaping
#
# Prior to version 3.0.5, the handling of backslashes was a little
# awkward, i.e. "wrong". In some cases, to get one backslash into
# a regex, you had to put 4 in the config files.
#
# Version 3.0.5 fixes that. However, for backwards compatibility,
# the new method of escaping is DISABLED BY DEFAULT. This means
# that upgrading to 3.0.5 won't break your configuration.
#
# If you don't have double backslashes (i.e. \\) in your configuration,
# this won't matter to you. If you do have them, fix that to use only
# one backslash, and then set "correct_escapes = true".
#
# You can check for this by doing:
#
# $ grep '\\\\' $(find raddb -type f -print)
#
correct_escapes = true
# panic_action: Command to execute if the server dies unexpectedly.
#
# FOR PRODUCTION SYSTEMS, ACTIONS SHOULD ALWAYS EXIT.
# AN INTERACTIVE ACTION MEANS THE SERVER IS NOT RESPONDING TO REQUESTS.
# AN INTERACTICE ACTION MEANS THE SERVER WILL NOT RESTART.
#
# THE SERVER MUST NOT BE ALLOWED EXECUTE UNTRUSTED PANIC ACTION CODE
# PATTACH CAN BE USED AS AN ATTACK VECTOR.
#
# The panic action is a command which will be executed if the server
# receives a fatal, non user generated signal, i.e. SIGSEGV, SIGBUS,
# SIGABRT or SIGFPE.
#
# This can be used to start an interactive debugging session so
# that information regarding the current state of the server can
# be acquired.
#
# The following string substitutions are available:
# - %e The currently executing program e.g. /sbin/radiusd
# - %p The PID of the currently executing program e.g. 12345
#
# Standard ${} substitutions are also allowed.
#
# An example panic action for opening an interactive session in GDB would be:
#
#panic_action = "gdb %e %p"
#
# Again, don't use that on a production system.
#
# An example panic action for opening an automated session in GDB would be:
#
#panic_action = "gdb -silent -x ${raddbdir}/panic.gdb %e %p 2>&1 | tee ${logdir}/gdb-${name}-%p.log"
#
# That command can be used on a production system.
#
# max_request_time: The maximum time (in seconds) to handle a request.
#
# Requests which take more time than this to process may be killed, and
# a REJECT message is returned.
#
# WARNING: If you notice that requests take a long time to be handled,
# then this MAY INDICATE a bug in the server, in one of the modules
# used to handle a request, OR in your local configuration.
#
# This problem is most often seen when using an SQL database. If it takes
# more than a second or two to receive an answer from the SQL database,
# then it probably means that you haven't indexed the database. See your
# SQL server documentation for more information.
#
# Useful range of values: 5 to 120
#
max_request_time = 30
# cleanup_delay: The time to wait (in seconds) before cleaning up
# a reply which was sent to the NAS.
#
# The RADIUS request is normally cached internally for a short period
# of time, after the reply is sent to the NAS. The reply packet may be
# lost in the network, and the NAS will not see it. The NAS will then
# re-send the request, and the server will respond quickly with the
# cached reply.
#
# If this value is set too low, then duplicate requests from the NAS
# MAY NOT be detected, and will instead be handled as separate requests.
#
# If this value is set too high, then the server will cache too many
# requests, and some new requests may get blocked. (See 'max_requests'.)
#
# Useful range of values: 2 to 30
#
cleanup_delay = 5
# max_requests: The maximum number of requests which the server keeps
# track of. This should be 256 multiplied by the number of clients.
# e.g. With 4 clients, this number should be 1024.
#
# If this number is too low, then when the server becomes busy,
# it will not respond to any new requests, until the 'cleanup_delay'
# time has passed, and it has removed the old requests.
#
# If this number is set too high, then the server will use a bit more
# memory for no real benefit.
#
# If you aren't sure what it should be set to, it's better to set it
# too high than too low. Setting it to 1000 per client is probably
# the highest it should be.
#
# Useful range of values: 256 to infinity
#
max_requests = 16384
# hostname_lookups: Log the names of clients or just their IP addresses
# e.g., www.freeradius.org (on) or 206.47.27.232 (off).
#
# The default is 'off' because it would be overall better for the net
# if people had to knowingly turn this feature on, since enabling it
# means that each client request will result in AT LEAST one lookup
# request to the nameserver. Enabling hostname_lookups will also
# mean that your server may stop randomly for 30 seconds from time
# to time, if the DNS requests take too long.
#
# Turning hostname lookups off also means that the server won't block
# for 30 seconds, if it sees an IP address which has no name associated
# with it.
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
hostname_lookups = no
#
# Logging section. The various "log_*" configuration items
# will eventually be moved here.
#
log {
#
# Destination for log messages. This can be one of:
#
# files - log to "file", as defined below.
# syslog - to syslog (see also the "syslog_facility", below.
# stdout - standard output
# stderr - standard error.
#
# The command-line option "-X" over-rides this option, and forces
# logging to go to stdout.
#
destination = files
#
# Highlight important messages sent to stderr and stdout.
#
# Option will be ignored (disabled) if output if TERM is not
# an xterm or output is not to a TTY.
#
colourise = yes
#
# The logging messages for the server are appended to the
# tail of this file if destination == "files"
#
# If the server is running in debugging mode, this file is
# NOT used.
#
file = ${logdir}/radius.log
#
# Which syslog facility to use, if ${destination} == "syslog"
#
# The exact values permitted here are OS-dependent. You probably
# don't want to change this.
#
syslog_facility = daemon
# Log the full User-Name attribute, as it was found in the request.
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
stripped_names = no
# Log all (accept and reject) authentication results to the log file.
#
# This is the same as setting "auth_accept = yes" and
# "auth_reject = yes"
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
auth = no
# Log Access-Accept results to the log file.
#
# This is only used if "auth = no"
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
# auth_accept = no
# Log Access-Reject results to the log file.
#
# This is only used if "auth = no"
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
# auth_reject = no
# Log passwords with the authentication requests.
# auth_badpass - logs password if it's rejected
# auth_goodpass - logs password if it's correct
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
auth_badpass = no
auth_goodpass = no
# Log additional text at the end of the "Login OK" messages.
# for these to work, the "auth" and "auth_goodpass" or "auth_badpass"
# configurations above have to be set to "yes".
#
# The strings below are dynamically expanded, which means that
# you can put anything you want in them. However, note that
# this expansion can be slow, and can negatively impact server
# performance.
#
# msg_goodpass = ""
# msg_badpass = ""
# The message when the user exceeds the Simultaneous-Use limit.
#
msg_denied = "You are already logged in - access denied"
}
# The program to execute to do concurrency checks.
checkrad = ${sbindir}/checkrad
#
# ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
#
# You can reference environment variables using an expansion like
# `$ENV{PATH}`. However it is sometimes useful to be able to also set
# environment variables. This section lets you do that.
#
# The main purpose of this section is to allow administrators to keep
# RADIUS-specific configuration in the RADIUS configuration files.
# For example, if you need to set an environment variable which is
# used by a module. You could put that variable into a shell script,
# but that's awkward. Instead, just list it here.
#
# Note that these environment variables are set AFTER the
# configuration file is loaded. So you cannot set FOO here, and
# expect to reference it via `$ENV{FOO}` in another configuration file.
# You should instead just use a normal configuration variable for
# that.
#
ENV {
#
# Set environment varable `FOO` to value '/bar/baz'.
#
# NOTE: Note that you MUST use '='. You CANNOT use '+=' to append
# values.
#
# FOO = '/bar/baz'
#
# Delete environment variable `BAR`.
#
# BAR
#
# `LD_PRELOAD` is special. It is normally set before the
# application runs, and is interpreted by the dynamic linker.
# Which means you cannot set it inside of an application, and
# expect it to load libraries.
#
# Since this functionality is useful, we extend it here.
#
# You can set
#
# LD_PRELOAD = /path/to/library.so
#
# and the server will load the named libraries. Multiple
# libraries can be loaded by specificing multiple individual
# `LD_PRELOAD` entries.
#
#
# LD_PRELOAD = /path/to/library1.so
# LD_PRELOAD = /path/to/library2.so
}
# SECURITY CONFIGURATION
#
# There may be multiple methods of attacking on the server. This
# section holds the configuration items which minimize the impact
# of those attacks
#
security {
# chroot: directory where the server does "chroot".
#
# The chroot is done very early in the process of starting
# the server. After the chroot has been performed it
# switches to the "user" listed below (which MUST be
# specified). If "group" is specified, it switches to that
# group, too. Any other groups listed for the specified
# "user" in "/etc/group" are also added as part of this
# process.
#
# The current working directory (chdir / cd) is left
# *outside* of the chroot until all of the modules have been
# initialized. This allows the "raddb" directory to be left
# outside of the chroot. Once the modules have been
# initialized, it does a "chdir" to ${logdir}. This means
# that it should be impossible to break out of the chroot.
#
# If you are worried about security issues related to this
# use of chdir, then simply ensure that the "raddb" directory
# is inside of the chroot, end be sure to do "cd raddb"
# BEFORE starting the server.
#
# If the server is statically linked, then the only files
# that have to exist in the chroot are ${run_dir} and
# ${logdir}. If you do the "cd raddb" as discussed above,
# then the "raddb" directory has to be inside of the chroot
# directory, too.
#
# chroot = /path/to/chroot/directory
# user/group: The name (or #number) of the user/group to run radiusd as.
#
# If these are commented out, the server will run as the
# user/group that started it. In order to change to a
# different user/group, you MUST be root ( or have root
# privileges ) to start the server.
#
# We STRONGLY recommend that you run the server with as few
# permissions as possible. That is, if you're not using
# shadow passwords, the user and group items below should be
# set to radius'.
#
# NOTE that some kernels refuse to setgid(group) when the
# value of (unsigned)group is above 60000; don't use group
# "nobody" on these systems!
#
# On systems with shadow passwords, you might have to set
# 'group = shadow' for the server to be able to read the
# shadow password file. If you can authenticate users while
# in debug mode, but not in daemon mode, it may be that the
# debugging mode server is running as a user that can read
# the shadow info, and the user listed below can not.
#
# The server will also try to use "initgroups" to read
# /etc/groups. It will join all groups where "user" is a
# member. This can allow for some finer-grained access
# controls.
#
# user = radius
# group = radius
# Core dumps are a bad thing. This should only be set to
# 'yes' if you're debugging a problem with the server.
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
allow_core_dumps = no
#
# max_attributes: The maximum number of attributes
# permitted in a RADIUS packet. Packets which have MORE
# than this number of attributes in them will be dropped.
#
# If this number is set too low, then no RADIUS packets
# will be accepted.
#
# If this number is set too high, then an attacker may be
# able to send a small number of packets which will cause
# the server to use all available memory on the machine.
#
# Setting this number to 0 means "allow any number of attributes"
max_attributes = 200
#
# reject_delay: When sending an Access-Reject, it can be
# delayed for a few seconds. This may help slow down a DoS
# attack. It also helps to slow down people trying to brute-force
# crack a users password.
#
# Setting this number to 0 means "send rejects immediately"
#
# If this number is set higher than 'cleanup_delay', then the
# rejects will be sent at 'cleanup_delay' time, when the request
# is deleted from the internal cache of requests.
#
# As of Version 3.0.5, "reject_delay" has sub-second resolution.
# e.g. "reject_delay = 1.4" seconds is possible.
#
# Useful ranges: 1 to 5
reject_delay = 1
#
# status_server: Whether or not the server will respond
# to Status-Server requests.
#
# When sent a Status-Server message, the server responds with
# an Access-Accept or Accounting-Response packet.
#
# This is mainly useful for administrators who want to "ping"
# the server, without adding test users, or creating fake
# accounting packets.
#
# It's also useful when a NAS marks a RADIUS server "dead".
# The NAS can periodically "ping" the server with a Status-Server
# packet. If the server responds, it must be alive, and the
# NAS can start using it for real requests.
#
# See also raddb/sites-available/status
#
status_server = yes
@openssl_version_check_config@
}
# PROXY CONFIGURATION
#
# proxy_requests: Turns proxying of RADIUS requests on or off.
#
# The server has proxying turned on by default. If your system is NOT
# set up to proxy requests to another server, then you can turn proxying
# off here. This will save a small amount of resources on the server.
#
# If you have proxying turned off, and your configuration files say
# to proxy a request, then an error message will be logged.
#
# To disable proxying, change the "yes" to "no", and comment the
# $INCLUDE line.
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
proxy_requests = yes
$INCLUDE proxy.conf
# CLIENTS CONFIGURATION
#
# Client configuration is defined in "clients.conf".
#
# The 'clients.conf' file contains all of the information from the old
# 'clients' and 'naslist' configuration files. We recommend that you
# do NOT use 'client's or 'naslist', although they are still
# supported.
#
# Anything listed in 'clients.conf' will take precedence over the
# information from the old-style configuration files.
#
$INCLUDE clients.conf
# THREAD POOL CONFIGURATION
#
# The thread pool is a long-lived group of threads which
# take turns (round-robin) handling any incoming requests.
#
# You probably want to have a few spare threads around,
# so that high-load situations can be handled immediately. If you
# don't have any spare threads, then the request handling will
# be delayed while a new thread is created, and added to the pool.
#
# You probably don't want too many spare threads around,
# otherwise they'll be sitting there taking up resources, and
# not doing anything productive.
#
# The numbers given below should be adequate for most situations.
#
thread pool {
# Number of servers to start initially --- should be a reasonable
# ballpark figure.
start_servers = 5
# Limit on the total number of servers running.
#
# If this limit is ever reached, clients will be LOCKED OUT, so it
# should NOT BE SET TOO LOW. It is intended mainly as a brake to
# keep a runaway server from taking the system with it as it spirals
# down...
#
# You may find that the server is regularly reaching the
# 'max_servers' number of threads, and that increasing
# 'max_servers' doesn't seem to make much difference.
#
# If this is the case, then the problem is MOST LIKELY that
# your back-end databases are taking too long to respond, and
# are preventing the server from responding in a timely manner.
#
# The solution is NOT do keep increasing the 'max_servers'
# value, but instead to fix the underlying cause of the
# problem: slow database, or 'hostname_lookups=yes'.
#
# For more information, see 'max_request_time', above.
#
max_servers = 32
# Server-pool size regulation. Rather than making you guess
# how many servers you need, FreeRADIUS dynamically adapts to
# the load it sees, that is, it tries to maintain enough
# servers to handle the current load, plus a few spare
# servers to handle transient load spikes.
#
# It does this by periodically checking how many servers are
# waiting for a request. If there are fewer than
# min_spare_servers, it creates a new spare. If there are
# more than max_spare_servers, some of the spares die off.
# The default values are probably OK for most sites.
#
min_spare_servers = 3
max_spare_servers = 10
# When the server receives a packet, it places it onto an
# internal queue, where the worker threads (configured above)
# pick it up for processing. The maximum size of that queue
# is given here.
#
# When the queue is full, any new packets will be silently
# discarded.
#
# The most common cause of the queue being full is that the
# server is dependent on a slow database, and it has received
# a large "spike" of traffic. When that happens, there is
# very little you can do other than make sure the server
# receives less traffic, or make sure that the database can
# handle the load.
#
# max_queue_size = 65536
# Clean up old threads periodically. For no reason other than
# it might be useful.
#
# '0' is a special value meaning 'infinity', or 'the servers never
# exit'
max_requests_per_server = 0
# Automatically limit the number of accounting requests.
# This configuration item tracks how many requests per second
# the server can handle. It does this by tracking the
# packets/s received by the server for processing, and
# comparing that to the packets/s handled by the child
# threads.
#
# If the received PPS is larger than the processed PPS, *and*
# the queue is more than half full, then new accounting
# requests are probabilistically discarded. This lowers the
# number of packets that the server needs to process. Over
# time, the server will "catch up" with the traffic.
#
# Throwing away accounting packets is usually safe and low
# impact. The NAS will retransmit them in a few seconds, or
# even a few minutes. Vendors should read RFC 5080 Section 2.2.1
# to see how accounting packets should be retransmitted. Using
# any other method is likely to cause network meltdowns.
#
auto_limit_acct = no
}
######################################################################
#
# SNMP notifications. Uncomment the following line to enable
# snmptraps. Note that you MUST also configure the full path
# to the "snmptrap" command in the "trigger.conf" file.
#
#$INCLUDE trigger.conf
# MODULE CONFIGURATION
#
# The names and configuration of each module is located in this section.
#
# After the modules are defined here, they may be referred to by name,
# in other sections of this configuration file.
#
modules {
#
# Each module has a configuration as follows:
#
# name [ instance ] {
# config_item = value
# ...
# }
#
# The 'name' is used to load the 'rlm_name' library
# which implements the functionality of the module.
#
# The 'instance' is optional. To have two different instances
# of a module, it first must be referred to by 'name'.
# The different copies of the module are then created by
# inventing two 'instance' names, e.g. 'instance1' and 'instance2'
#
# The instance names can then be used in later configuration
# INSTEAD of the original 'name'. See the 'radutmp' configuration
# for an example.
#
#
# Some modules have ordering issues. e.g. "sqlippool" uses
# the configuration from "sql". In that case, the "sql"
# module must be read off of disk before the "sqlippool".
# However, the directory inclusion below just reads the
# directory from start to finish. Which means that the
# modules are read off of disk randomly.
#
# As of 3.0.18, you can list individual modules *before* the
# directory inclusion. Those modules will be loaded first.
# Then, when the directory is read, those modules will be
# skipped and not read twice.
#
# $INCLUDE mods-enabled/sql
#
# As of 3.0, modules are in mods-enabled/. Files matching
# the regex /[a-zA-Z0-9_.]+/ are loaded. The modules are
# initialized ONLY if they are referenced in a processing
# section, such as authorize, authenticate, accounting,
# pre/post-proxy, etc.
#
$INCLUDE mods-enabled/
}
# Instantiation
#
# This section sets the instantiation order of the modules. listed
# here will get started up BEFORE the sections like authorize,
# authenticate, etc. get examined.
#
# This section is not strictly needed. When a section like authorize
# refers to a module, the module is automatically loaded and
# initialized. However, some modules may not be listed in any of the
# processing sections, so they should be listed here.
#
# Also, listing modules here ensures that you have control over
# the order in which they are initialized. If one module needs
# something defined by another module, you can list them in order
# here, and ensure that the configuration will be OK.
#
# After the modules listed here have been loaded, all of the modules
# in the "mods-enabled" directory will be loaded. Loading the
# "mods-enabled" directory means that unlike Version 2, you usually
# don't need to list modules here.
#
instantiate {
#
# We list the counter module here so that it registers
# the check_name attribute before any module which sets
# it
# daily
# subsections here can be thought of as "virtual" modules.
#
# e.g. If you have two redundant SQL servers, and you want to
# use them in the authorize and accounting sections, you could
# place a "redundant" block in each section, containing the
# exact same text. Or, you could uncomment the following
# lines, and list "redundant_sql" in the authorize and
# accounting sections.
#
# The "virtual" module defined here can also be used with
# dynamic expansions, under a few conditions:
#
# * The section is "redundant", or "load-balance", or
# "redundant-load-balance"
# * The section contains modules ONLY, and no sub-sections
# * all modules in the section are using the same rlm_
# driver, e.g. They are all sql, or all ldap, etc.
#
# When those conditions are satisfied, the server will
# automatically register a dynamic expansion, using the
# name of the "virtual" module. In the example below,
# it will be "redundant_sql". You can then use this expansion
# just like any other:
#
# update reply {
# Filter-Id := "%{redundant_sql: ... }"
# }
#
# In this example, the expansion is done via module "sql1",
# and if that expansion fails, using module "sql2".
#
# For best results, configure the "pool" subsection of the
# module so that "retry_delay" is non-zero. That will allow
# the redundant block to quickly ignore all "down" SQL
# databases. If instead we have "retry_delay = 0", then
# every time the redundant block is used, the server will try
# to open a connection to every "down" database, causing
# problems.
#
#redundant redundant_sql {
# sql1
# sql2
#}
}
######################################################################
#
# Policies are virtual modules, similar to those defined in the
# "instantiate" section above.
#
# Defining a policy in one of the policy.d files means that it can be
# referenced in multiple places as a *name*, rather than as a series of
# conditions to match, and actions to take.
#
# Policies are something like subroutines in a normal language, but
# they cannot be called recursively. They MUST be defined in order.
# If policy A calls policy B, then B MUST be defined before A.
#
######################################################################
policy {
$INCLUDE policy.d/
}
######################################################################
#
# Load virtual servers.
#
# This next $INCLUDE line loads files in the directory that
# match the regular expression: /[a-zA-Z0-9_.]+/
#
# It allows you to define new virtual servers simply by placing
# a file into the raddb/sites-enabled/ directory.
#
$INCLUDE sites-enabled/
######################################################################
#
# All of the other configuration sections like "authorize {}",
# "authenticate {}", "accounting {}", have been moved to the
# the file:
#
# raddb/sites-available/default
#
# This is the "default" virtual server that has the same
# configuration as in version 1.0.x and 1.1.x. The default
# installation enables this virtual server. You should
# edit it to create policies for your local site.
#
# For more documentation on virtual servers, see:
#
# raddb/sites-available/README
#
######################################################################
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