This application demonstrates the deployment of a Java based microservices application using Microprofile on Kubernetes Cluster. MicroProfile is a baseline platform definition that optimizes Enterprise Java for a microservices architecture and delivers application portability across multiple MicroProfile runtimes
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README.md

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Deploy MicroProfile based Java microservices on Kubernetes.

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This code demonstrates the deployment of a Java based microservices application using MicroProfile on Kubernetes.

MicroProfile is a baseline platform definition that optimizes Enterprise Java for a microservices architecture and delivers application portability across multiple MicroProfile runtimes.

The sample application used is a web application for managing a conference and is based on a number of discrete microservices. The front end is written in Angular; the backing microservices are in Java. All run on Open Liberty, in Docker containers managed by Kubernetes. It's based on a demo application from the MicroProfile platform team.

Flow

Included Components

Getting Started

Kubernetes

In order to follow this guide you'll need a Kubernetes cluster. If you do not have access to an existing Kubernetes cluster then follow the instructions (in the link) for one of the following:

Note: These instructions are tested on Kubernetes 1.10.5. Your mileage may vary if you use a version much lower or higher than this.

After installing (or setting up your access to) Kubernetes ensure that you can access it by running the following and confirming you get version responses for both the Client and the Server:

$ kubectl version

Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"11", GitVersion:"v1.11.0", GitCommit:"91e7b4fd31fcd3d5f436da26c980becec37ceefe", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-06-27T20:17:28Z", GoVersion:"go1.10.2", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"10", GitVersion:"v1.10.5+IKS", GitCommit:"7593549b33fb8ab65a9a112387f2e0f464a1ae87", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-07-19T06:26:20Z", GoVersion:"go1.9.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}

Steps

1. Clone Repository

First, clone our repository.

git clone https://github.com/IBM/Java-MicroProfile-on-Kubernetes.git
cd Java-MicroProfile-on-Kubernetes

2. Optional Step - Build Application

If you want to build the application yourself now would be a good time to do that. Please follow the rebuild steps if you'd like to re-create images with the latest available Open Liberty version. However for the sake of demonstration you can use the images that we've already built and uploaded to the journeycode docker repository.

3. Deploy Microservices

Now, deploy the microservices with the commands:

If using Minikube / ICP run:

$ cd scripts
$ ./set-ingress-minikube.sh

If using IBM Cloud Kubernetes Service, run:

$ cd scripts
$ ./set-ingress-host [cluster name]
$ ./cloudant-secret.sh

Finally, deploy all microservices:

$ kubectl create -f manifests
persistentvolume "cloudant-pv" created
persistentvolumeclaim "cloudant-pv-claim" created
service "cloudant-service" created
deployment "cloudant-db" created
...
...

Note: this will deploy all of the kubernetes manifests in the manifests/ directory. Take some time to explore their contents to get an idea of the resources being used to deploy and expose the app.

After you have created all the services and deployments, wait for 10 to 15 minutes. You can check the status of your deployment on Kubernetes UI. If using Minikube, run 'kubectl proxy' and go to URL 'http://127.0.0.1:8001/ui' to check when the application containers are ready.

Kubernetes Status Page

After a few minutes you should be able to access the application. Part of our deployment is a Kubernetes Ingress resource. If your Kubernetes cluster already has an ingress service such as IBM Cloud Private then you should be able to access the application with no further changes.

However if you are using minikube, or a Kubernetes cluster that does not have an ingress service you have one more step before you can access your cluster. On minikube you can do the following:

$ minikube addons enable ingress
ingress was successfully enabled
$ minikube ip
192.168.99.100

With an Ingress controller enabled you can access the app via the IP provided by minikube above.

If running on IBM Cloud Kubernetes Service, you will use the hostname to access the application, which you can retrieve with the following:

$ kubectl get ing
NAME                   HOSTS                                          ADDRESS          PORTS     AGE
microprofile-ingress   microkube.us-east.containers.appdomain.cloud   ***.***.***.***   80, 443   1m

Now you can use the link http://[Public URL] to access your application in a browser.

Web application home page

Web-app Home Page

When you click on speaker name

Speaker Info

When you click on schedules link

Schedule Info

When you click on vote link

Vote Info

Troubleshooting

  • If your microservice instance is not running properly, you may check the logs using
    • kubectl logs <your-pod-name>
  • To delete a microservice
    • kubectl delete -f manifests/<microservice-yaml-file>
  • To delete all microservices
    • kubectl delete -f manifests

References