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WooCommerce order fetcher
JavaScript
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semantic-release-bot chore(release): 1.0.6 [skip ci]
## [1.0.6](v1.0.5...v1.0.6) (2019-08-30)

### Bug Fixes

* **package:** update inquirer to version 7.0.0 ([426fe19](426fe19))
* **package:** update yargs to version 14.0.0 ([8f513ee](8f513ee))
Latest commit 07c950b Aug 30, 2019

README.md

order-fetcher

Retrieves WooComerce order information and saves it as a CSV file.

npm version build status code coverage dependencies greenkeeper

Getting started

After installing order-fetcher (via npm install -g order-fetcher), you can run orders config init to create your initial configuration file. It will ask a bunch of questions to help get everything set up. You will need to make sure that the WooCommerce API is enabled, and that you have a key and secret defined. Because order-fetcher only ever retrieves data, and never makes changes to your site, it only requires read-only access.

The nickname you give your site allows you to disambiguate if you have more than one: orders host1 ... and orders host2 ... will retrieve data from either “host1” or “host2”, assuming those are the nicknames you gave. (But please, for your own sanity, use useful and memorable nicknames!)

If you don’t have too many historical orders on your site, your first request can be as simple as orders host1. If you have a lot of orders, however, that command can take a while. Using the --after option to only include orders on-or-after a particular date (like orders host1 --after 2019-07-01) can dramatically improve performance.

Usage

As of v1.0, order-fetcher now also installs as the command orders, and uses a more “subcommand”-style command-line (like git, npm, and other tools). It also uses the host nicknames (as defined above, in Getting Started) as subcommand shortcuts rather than the older and more-verbose --host hostname flag. Note that you can still use orders get --host host1 ... rather than orders host1 ..., but you’ll find that the newer second invocation is more natural and involves less typing.

When all else fails, orders --help (or order-fetcher --help) lists all of the available options.

Top-level commands/options

command description
config shows configuration information
get (or host nickname) retrieves orders from a WooCommerce site
list (or host nickname) summarize skus and/or statuses from a WooCommerce site (TODO!)
-v, --verbose increase verbosity of logging output, can be given multiple times
-h, --help output usage information
--version output the version number

config commands/options

option description
init interactive first-time configuration set up
view show current configuration
add [host] add a new WooCommerce host (interactive, like init)
remove [host] remove an existing WooCommerce host
timezone (or tz) [zone] change the timezone (interactive if zone is not provided)
-h, --help output usage information

Get / Host-nickname commands/options

option description
list summarize skus and/or statuses from a WooCommerce site (TODO)
--host host WooCommerce host to use (only for orders get)
--after date include only orders after the date
--before date include only orders before the date
--status status include only orders with the given status
--sku sku filter to the specific sku, can be given multiple times (default: )
-o, --out filename file to write (CSV format)

Best practices

For WooCommerce installations with a large number of historical orders, making use of the --after options is highly recommended. Similarly, use --status processing to only include orders that haven't been handled yet. (And then mark those orders as "completed" as soon as you deal with them.)

When generating CSV output, the columns come directly from the item information in WooCommerce. More than likely, you'll want to use the --sku option to create CSV files on a sku-by-sku basis.

Examples

orders host1 --after 2019-01-01 --status processing --list-skus

Retrieve all orders after 1 January 2019 (inclusive) with a status of "processing", and list the unique SKUs. This is useful as a precursor to creating per-SKU CSV files.

orders host1 --after 2019-01-01 --status processing --sku some-sku --out some-sku.csv

Retrieve all orders as in the previous command, filter the items to the SKU 'some-sku', and write to 'some-sku.csv'.

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