Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
MATLAB and R implementations of the variational inference procedure for Bayesian variable selection. The algorithm is described in Peter Carbonetto and Matthew Stephens (2012). "Scalable variational inference for Bayesian variable selection in regression, and its accuracy in genetic association studies." Bayesian Analysis 7, pages 73-108.
branch: master

This branch is 84 commits behind pcarbo:master

Fetching latest commit…

Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time

Failed to load latest commit information.
MATLAB
R/varbvs
LICENSE
README.md

README.md

Variational inference for Bayesian variable selection implemented in MATLAB and R

Introduction

This software package includes MATLAB and R implementations of the variational inference procedure for Bayesian variable selection, as described in the Bayesian Analysis paper Scalable variational inference for Bayesian variable selection in regression, and its accuracy in genetic association studies (Bayesian Analysis 7, March 2012, pages 73-108). This software has been used to implement Bayesian variable selection for large problems with over a million variables and thousands of samples.

The MATLAB implementation has been tested in version 7.10 (R2010a) of MATLAB for 64-bit Linux. The R implementation has been tested in version 2.14.2 of R for 64-bit Linux.

License

Variational inference for Bayesian variable selection by Peter Carbonetto is free software: you can redistribute it under the terms of the GNU General Public License. All the files in this project are part of Variational inference for Bayesian variable selection. This project is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. See file LICENSE for the full text of the license.

Copyright 2012 Peter Carbonetto.

This project includes several MATLAB functions created by James P. LeSage as part of the Econometrics Toolbox (March 2010 revision), which is also distributed under the GNU General Public License. None of code from this toolbox has been modified. Also included (without any changes) is the MATLAB function rgb.m written by Kristján Jónasson.

Quick start for MATLAB

Start by downloading the github repository for this project. The simplest way to do this is to download the repository as a ZIP archive. Once you have extracted the files from the compressed archive, you will see that the main directory contains two subdirectories, one for the MATLAB functions, and one for the R code.

Next you will need to compile the C code into MATLAB executable ("MEX") files. To do this, you will need to have a C compiler supported by MATLAB, and you will need to configure MATLAB to build MEX files. See this webpage for details. When you follow this step, it is important that you configure MATLAB so that it uses the version of the C compiler that is compatible with your version of MATLAB. Otherwise, you will encounter errors when building the MEX files, or MATLAB may crash when attempting to run the examples. If you run into these problems, you may have to run the mex command with the -v flag to check what compiler is being used, and you may have to edit the MEX configuration file manually.

To build the necessary MEX files, run the install.m script in MATLAB.

Note that the beginning of this script sets some compiler and linker flags. These flags tell the GCC compiler to use the ISO C99 standard, and to optimize the code as much as possible. However, these flags may not be relevant to your setup, especially if you are not using GCC. To avoid errors during installation, if you are using a compiler other than GCC, it may be best to set variables cflags and ldflags to empty strings before running the install.m script.

If you modify the installation procedure to fit your compiler setup, it is important that you define macro MATLAB_MEX_FILE, akin to the #define MATLAB_MEX_FILE directive in C. In GCC, this is accomplished by including flag -DMATLAB_MEX_FILE when issuing the commands to build MEX files.

Once you have built the MEX files, start by running the script example1.m. This script demonstrates how the variational inference algorithm is used to compute posterior probabilities for a small linear regression example in which only a small subset of the variables (single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs) has affects the outcome (a simulated quantitative trait). In this small example, the variational estimates of the posterior probabilities are compared with estimates obtained by MCMC simulation. Notice that it takes a considerable amount of time to simulate the Markov chain.

Quick start for R

Start by downloading the github repository for this project. The simplest way to do this is to download the repository as a ZIP archive. Once you have extracted the files from the compressed archive, you will see that the main directory has two subdirectories, one containing the MATLAB code, and the other containing R files.

The subdirectory R/varbvs has all the necessary files to build and install a package for R. To install this package, follow the standard instructions for installing an R package from source. On a Unix or Unix-like platform (such as Mac OS X), the installation command is R CMD INSTALL homedir/varbvs/R/varbvs.

Once you have installed the package, you can load the functions in R by running library(varbvs). To get an overview of the package, run help(varbvs) and help(package="varbvs") in R.

Once you have installed and loaded the varbvs package, start by running the demonstration script with demo(example1). This script demonstrates how the variational inference algorithm is used to compute posterior probabilities for a small linear regression example in which only a small subset of the variables (single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs) has affects the outcome (a simulated quantitative trait).

Note that the demonstration script example1.R requires packages ggplot2 and grid to show the plots depicting the posterior distributions of the hyperparameters computed using the variational inference method. The grid package is normally included in the base distribution of R, and ggplot2 is available on CRAN, and can be installed using the install.packages function (for more recent versions of R).

Overview of R and MATLAB functions

The MATLAB subdirectory and R package contain several functions. Here are the most interesting ones:

  • varbvs in MATLAB or varbvsoptimize in R returns variational estimates of the posterior statistics for the linear regression model with spike and slab priors, given choices for the hyperparameters. It computes the posterior statistics by running the coordinate ascent updates until they converge at a local minimum of the Kullback-Leibler divergence objective (which corresponds to a local maximum of the variational lower bound to the marginal log-likelihood). This function implements the "inner loop" in the Bayesian Analysis paper.

  • varbvsbin in MATLAB or varbvsbinoptimize in R is analogous to varbvs or varbvsoptimize, except that it is meant for logistic regression instead of linear regression. This is useful for modeling a binary-valued outcome such as disease status in a case-control study.

  • varsimbvs (MATLAB and R) demonstrates how to run the full variational inference procedure for Bayesian variable selection in linear regression, in which we fit both the regression coefficients and the hyperparameters to the data. It runs both the "inner" and "outer" loops of the inference algorithm, where the inner loop executes the coordinate ascent updates for a given value of the hyperparameters, and the outer loop runs importance sampling to estimate the posterior of the hyperparameters. This is precisely the variational inference procedure used in the two simulation studies presented in the Bayesian Analysis paper. This function assumes specific choices for priors on the hyperparameters, as described in the paper and in the comments at the top of the file.

Who

Variational inference for Bayesian variable selection was developed by:
[Peter Carbonetto]((http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/pcarbo)
Dept. of Human Genetics
University of Chicago
March 2012

Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.