Be lazy, and let this vim plugin create lists for you
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README.md

LazyList, a quick way to create lists in Vim

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Description | Installation | How to use | How it works | Configuration | TODO | Notes

Description

LazyList is a vim plugin who gives you possibility to create ordered and non ordered lists very quickly, and this by adding indices to the beginning of each line in the current selection.

LazyList main example

With non numerical indices, the plugin can even act smartly:

TODO example

As a bonus, the selection algorithm of the plugin can be used as a text-object, refer to the configuration part.

Text-object visual selection

Installation

This plugin works great on vim >=7.4. If you are using version 7.3, consider using the fix-vim73 branch.

Manually

Install the distributed files into Vim runtime directory which is usually ~/.vim/, or $HOME/vimfiles on Windows.

Using a plugin manager

And this is the recommended way, use a vim plugin manager:

Plugin manager In vimrc Installation command
Vim-plug Plug 'KabbAmine/lazyList.vim' PlugInstall
Vundle Plugin 'KabbAmine/lazyList.vim' PluginInstall
NeoBundle NeoBundle 'KabbAmine/lazyList.vim' NeoBundleInstall

How to use

The plugin provides one unique command: LazyList which can be used to add/remove indices to/from a selection in NORMAL or VISUAL mode (This command can take 0 or 1 argument(s): The index).

The index can be:

  • A character or a string (e.g +, '* ','- ', 'Chapter X. '...)
  • A special pattern understandable by the plugin:
    • %number%: Produces indices starting from number (e.g %1%, %33%...)
  • Both of them (e.g 'Chapter 1, part %1% - '...)

The following examples will be more explicit.

Unordered list example

If I want to make a list with hyphens (_ is the current cursor position):

Element 1
Eleme_nt 2
Element 3

Executing :LazyList '- ' will produce:

- Element 1
- Eleme_nt 2
- Element 3

Note the single quotes in '- ', you should use them if you have space(s) in your index.

Simple ordered list example

If I want to make an ordered list (_ is the current cursor position):

Element 1
Ele_ment 2
Element 3

Executing :LazyList will produce :

1. Element 1
2. Ele_ment 2
3. Element 3

When no argument is given to LazyList, the default index %1%. is used.

Complex ordered list example

I want now to make an ordered list of 1000 elements, with indices from 2 till 1002 (2- , 3- , 4-, ...... 1000- , 1001- , 1002- ):

Element 1
Ele_ment 2
.
.
.
Element 999
Element 1000

A simple :LazyList '%2%- ' will produce:

2- Element 1
3- Ele_ment 2
.
.
.
1001- Element 999
1002- Element 1000

The syntax %2%- means:

  • '%2%' Create numerical indices starting from 2.
  • '- ' Add this string after the numerical indices.

Nice 😃 I change a few things ...

2- This is element 1
3- Foo
.
.
.
1001- Bar
1002- Lo_rem ipsum

... And now after thinking, I want to remove all those indices, so using the same command :LazyList '%2%- ' I can do that.

This is element 1
Foo
.
.
.
Bar
Lo_rem ipsum

A super gif to illustrate the example:

Unordered list example

Pretty quick, isn't it? 😄

Configuration

Normal mapping(s)

The plugin doesn't set any mapping, so feel free to create your own ones with your patterns:

Example:

nnoremap gll :LazyList<CR>
vnoremap gll :LazyList<CR>
nnoremap gl* :LazyList '* '<CR>
nnoremap gl* :LazyList '* '<CR>

Or in a better way, you can create them dynamically using the g:lazylist_maps variable (Check the next part for that).

Generate mapping(s) dynamically

Setting g:lazylist_maps variable in your vimrc will generate dynamically your mappings with their patterns.

This variable is a list containing 2 values:

  1. The prefix key
  2. A dictionary containing the keys and their patterns.
let g:lazylist_maps = [
			\ <prefixKey>,
			\ {
				\ <key>  : 'pattern',
				\ <key2>  : 'pattern2'
			\ }
		\]

And this will generate:

nnoremap <prefixKey + key> :LazyList 'pattern'<CR>
vnoremap <prefixKey + key> :LazyList 'pattern'<CR>
nnoremap <prefixKey + key2> :LazyList 'pattern2'<CR>
vnoremap <prefixKey + key2> :LazyList 'pattern2'<CR>

So for example, this ...

let g:lazylist_maps = [
			\ 'gl',
			\ {
				\ 'l'  : '',
				\ '-'  : '- ',
				\ 'p1'  : 'Part %1%. '
			\ }
		\]

... will generate the following mappings:

nnoremap gll :LazyList<CR>
vnoremap gll :LazyList<CR>
nnoremap gl- :LazyList '- '<CR>
vnoremap gl- :LazyList '- '<CR>
nnoremap glp1 :LazyList 'Part %1%. '<CR>
vnoremap glp1 :LazyList 'Part %1%. '<CR>

P.S: In fact, the generated mappings will use <Plug> instead of directly using the command LazyList.

Map the text-object

If you want to use the lazyList selection algorithm as a text-object, simply assign a mapping in g:lazylist_omap variable.

e.g.

let g:lazylist_omap = 'il'

Check my configuration for more examples.

How it works

The selection

In VISUAL mode, you just select the lines you want.

In NORMAL mode, the selection is automatically calculated depending on the current cursor position, it can be:

  • An indented block.
  • A block surrounded by empty lines.
  • A block surrounded by text of different indentation.

You can use this selection as a text-object, see here.

Here are some examples of automatic selection:

  1. An indented block

    foo
    bar
    	abcd     -----> {    1st line of selection
    	efj_h                Note that _ is the cursor position
    	ijkl     <----- }    Last line of selection
    
    oof
    qsdf
    jklmn
    rab
    
  2. A block surrounded by text with different indentation

    f_oo    -----> {
    bar     -----> }
    	abcd
    	efjh
    	ijkl
    
    oof
    qsdf
    jklmn
    rab
    
  3. A block surrounded by empty lines (Technically there is nothing after the block)

    foo
    bar
    	abcd
    	efjh
    	ijkl
    
    oof    -----> {
    qsdf
    jklm_n
    rab    -----> }
    

The command

This is how the command LazyList 'index' works, if the indices defined by index are not already present, we add them otherwise we remove them.

The index can be anything ('%1%. ' by default), but the plugin have some pattern(s) that he understands (Only one for the moment).

Let's consider some cases for the following example in a table:

Element 1
Element 2
Element 3
Command Use pattern Produces
:LazyList '%1%. ' (The one by default) 1. Element 1
2. Element 2
3. Element 3
:LazyList 'Chapter %3% - ' 'Chapter %3% - ' Chapter 3 - Element 1
Chapter 4 - Element 2
Chapter 5 - Element 3
:LazyList '1.%2%. ' '1.%2%. ' 1.2. Element 1
1.3. Element 2
1.4. Element 3
:LazyList '1 ' '1 ' 1 Element 1
1 Element 2
1 Element 3
:LazyList + + +Element 1
+Element 2
+Element 3
:LazyList '+ ' '+ ' + Element 1
+ Element 2
+ Element 3

So as you can see, %number% is a special pattern for the plugin, it tells him to produce indices starting from the given number. Another special patterns will be added in the future.

You can also prepend the command with a range:

:.,+5LazyList '+ '
:110,115LazyList '0%1%. '

TODO

  • Add doc file
  • Add new special patterns
  • Take account the commented lines (?)
  • Possibility to use more than one special pattern
  • Make README more understandable
  • Add test cases (Vader?)

My configuration

This is my configuration:

" Note the space after the command
nnoremap gli :LazyList 
vnoremap gli :LazyList 
let g:lazylist_omap = 'il'
let g:lazylist_maps = [
			\ 'gl',
			\ {
				\ 'l'  : '',
				\ '*'  : '* ',
				\ '-'   : '- ',
				\ 't'   : '- [ ] ',
				\ '2'  : '%2%. ',
				\ '3'  : '%3%. ',
				\ '4'  : '%4%. ',
				\ '5'  : '%5%. ',
				\ '6'  : '%6%. ',
				\ '7'  : '%7%. ',
				\ '8'  : '%8%. ',
				\ '9'  : '%9%. ',
				\ '.1' : '1.%1%. ',
				\ '.2' : '2.%1%. ',
				\ '.3' : '3.%1%. ',
				\ '.4' : '4.%1%. ',
				\ '.5' : '5.%1%. ',
				\ '.6' : '6.%1%. ',
				\ '.7' : '7.%1%. ',
				\ '.8' : '8.%1%. ',
				\ '.9' : '9.%1%. ',
			\ }
		\ ]

Notes

The main functionality of this plugin may not be something very fancy, but the great thing about it is that all the process is done very quickly, quicker than using any other vim methods (Global :g, macros...), try it. Also, the plugin may have some issues so don't hesitate to report them.

Don't forget to ⭐️ the repo if you find this plugin useful.

Thanks to Bram Moolenaar for creating the best piece of software in the world ❤️ and thanks to you if you're using lazyList.

License

MIT