A list of daily most used git commands for 24PR
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README.md

README.md

Git commands

A list of the most commonly used git commands

Cloning

Navigate into the folder you want to clone your project into

$ cd /chosen-path/

Then clone it

$ git clone [project URL]
If you want to do a shallow clone which would only get the recent commit and ignore all of the repos history you can do
$ git clone [project URL] --depth=1

Checking git status

Which files have changed, which branch is git using, etc

$ git status

Adding/committing and pushing

$ git add [file or directory]

$ git commit -m 'your commit message'

$ git push 

Creating a new branch

$ git checkout -b [branch-name]

Pushing your branch to the repo for the first time

$ git push -u origin [branch-name]

Switching branch

$ git checkout [branch-name]

To see a list of all your branches

$ git branch

Deleting a branch

Make sure you're not on the branch you want to delete otherwise it will not work

Delete a remote branch

$ git push origin --delete [branch-name]

Delete a local branch

$ git branch -d [branch-name]

This pulls your branch from origin if you do not have it locally

$ git checkout -b [branch-name] origin/[branch-name]

Safely merging a branch

Go onto the branch you want merge into, for example 'develop' then merge in your choosen branch for example 'kim-footer-amend'

$ git merge [branch-name] --no-commit --no-ff

(the --no-commit does not automatically commit the branch after merging and --no-ff does not fast forward the branch you're merging into)

Solving conflicts

This will check out their file if you know yours is incorrect

$ git checkout --theirs /path-to/conflict-file 

This will check out your file if you know the one in the repo is outdated

$ git checkout --ours /path-to/conflict-file

Otherwise, you'll have to manually sort through them in the conflicted file. Make sure you have no <<< or >>> in your file as your conflicts live in these.

Reverting a single file

This will undo all of your changes for a single file. This will lose any amends you haven't committed so only do this if you're sure.

$ git checkout -- /path-to/file

Reverting all of your current work

If you want to delete your current changes and revert back to the previous commmit (this will lose any amends you haven’t committed so only do this if you're sure)

$ git reset --hard

Show a log of your recent commits

$ git log