Skip to content
This repository

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP

A date and time library for Clojure, wrapping the Joda Time library.

branch: master
README.md

clj-time

A date and time library for Clojure, wrapping the Joda Time library.

Installation

clj-time is available as a Maven artifact via Clojars.

Usage

The main namespace for date-time operations in the clj-time library is clj-time.core.

=> (use 'clj-time.core)

Create a DateTime instance with date-time, specifying the year, month, day, hour, minute, second, and millisecond:

=> (date-time 1986 10 14 4 3 27 456)
#<DateTime 1986-10-14T04:03:27.456Z>

Less-significant fields can be omitted:

=> (date-time 1986 10 14)
#<DateTime 1986-10-14T00:00:00.000Z>

Get the current time with (now) and the start of the Unix epoch with (epcoh).

Once you have a date-time, use accessors like hour and sec to access the corresponding fields:

=> (hour (date-time 1986 10 14 22))
22

The date-time constructor always returns times in the UTC time zone. If you want a time with the specified fields in a different time zone, use from-time-zone:

=> (from-time-zone (date-time 1986 10 22) (time-zone-for-offset -2))
#<DateTime 1986-10-22T00:00:00.000-02:00>

If on the other hand you want a given absolute instant in time in a different time zone, use to-time-zone:

=> (to-time-zone (date-time 1986 10 22) (time-zone-for-offset -2))
#<DateTime 1986-10-21T22:00:00.000-02:00>

In addition to time-zone-for-offset, you can use the time-zone-for-id and default-time-zone functions and the utc Var to construct or get DateTimeZone instances.

The functions after? and before? determine the relative position of two DateTime instances:

=> (after? (date-time 1986 10) (date-time 1986 9))
true

Often you will want to find a date some amount of time from a given date. For example, to find the time 1 month and 3 weeks from a given date-time:

=> (plus (date-time 1986 10 14) (months 1) (weeks 3))
#<DateTime 1986-12-05T00:00:00.000Z>

To represent the amount of time between two DateTime instances, use duration. The in-secs and in-minutes functions can then be used to describe this duration in the corresponding temporal units:

=> (in-minutes (duration (date-time 1986 10 2) (date-time 1986 10 14)))
17280

An Interval is used to represent the span of time between two DateTime instances. Construct one using interval, then query them using within?, overlaps?, and abuts?

=> (within? (interval (date-time 1986) (date-time 1990))
            (date-time 1987))
true

If you need to parse or print date-times, use `clj-time.format:

=> (use 'clj-time.format)

Printing and printing are controlled by formatters. You can either use one of the built in ISO8601 formatters or define your own, e.g.:

(def built-in-formatter (formatters :basic-date-time))
(def custom-formatter (formatter \"yyyyMMdd\"))

To see a list of available built-in formatters and an example of a date-time printed in their format:

(show-formatters)

Once you have a formatter, parsing and printing are strait-forward:

=> (parse custom-formatter \"20100311\")
#<DateTime 2010-03-11T00:00:00.000Z>

=> (unparse custom-formatter (date-time 2010 10 3))
\"20101003\"

The namespace clj-time.coerce contains utility functions for coercing Joda DateTime instances to and from various other types:

=> (use 'clj-time.coerce)

For example, to convert a Joda DateTime to and from a Java long:

=> (to-long (date-time 1998 4 25))
893462400000

=> (from-long 893462400000)
#<DateTime 1998-04-25T00:00:00.000Z>"
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.