A lightweight filesystem backup manager written in node.js which is focused on but not limited to cloud-based storage containers.
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Furacao

For the people who like to store backups remotely to keep servers lean and compartmental™. For those who like to store on the same server - it can do that too.

Alt demo

Installation

npm install -g furacao

Options

  • --config (-c): Required. The configuration file. Can be relative or absolute.
  • --onetime: This will ignore the frequency property in the configuration file and the script will exit upon backing up. Suitable for using with a third-party program like cron to manage the schedule.

The end result will be an organized directory structure:

<backup-name>
|  <backup-name>-<year>-<month>-<day>--<hour>-<minute>-<second>-<period>.tar.gz
|  <backup-name>-<year>-<month>-<day>--<hour>-<minute>-<second>-<period>.tar.gz
|  <backup-name>-<year>-<month>-<day>--<hour>-<minute>-<second>-<period>.tar.gz
|  ...
<backup-name>
|  ...

Setup

It's a two step process.

Step 1: Create a configuration file.

{
  "frequency": 3600000,
  "provider": {
    "... SEE BELOW FOR PROVIDER INFO ..."
  },
  "backups": [
    {
      "name": "name-of-project",
      "dir": "path/to/dir",
      "glob": ["**/*", "!**/node_modules/**"]
    },
    {
      "name": "name-of-another",
      "dir": "path/to/dir/again",
      "glob": ["**/*", "!**/bower_components/**", "!**/.git/**"]
    }
  ]
}
Providers
Filesystem
"provider": {
  "name": "filesystem",
  "destination": "<folder-name>"
}
Amazon S3 Storage
"provider": {
  "name": "s3",
  "container": "<container-name>",
  "secretkey": "<secret-key>",
  "accesskey": "<access-key-id>",
  "region": "<region>"
}
Rackspace Cloud Files
"provider": {
  "name": "rackspace",
  "container": "<container-name>",
  "apikey": "<api-key>",
  "username": "<username>",
  "region": "<region>"
}

Step 2: Run furacao

You have many options. See below for some examples:

# Run in the foreground.
furacao -c path/to/config.json

# Run in the background.
nohup furacao -c path/to/config.json &

# You can also make it exit after calling using the --onetime flag. This will
# ignore the frequency property in the configuration file.
furacao -c path/to/config.json --onetime

# Here is an example of how a cronjob could look if you want to let cron back your
# files up every day at midnight.
# *Note* make sure you furacao is accessible to cron user.
00 00 * * * furacao -c /home/dev/furacao.json --onetime

Basically, you'll want to run this as a daemon on the OS so it's always in the background and started on boot. If you want to keep it all node.js, you could also use forever.js.

It's important to note that you don't need to re-run furacao after you make a change to the configuration file. It will read changes on the fly.