Simple and powerful redux middleware that supports async side-effects (and much more)
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README.md

redux-better-promise

Simple and powerful redux middleware that supports async side-effects (and much more)

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Redux middleware that will allow you to:

  • Create actions with side-effects that will dispatch different actions on different side-effect results
  • Create actions with both async and sync side-effects
  • Add hooks (callbacks) to you async actions so that you can treat dispatched actions like events and just react to them (e.g. show notification without checking if state changed)

FAQ

Why this exists?

There are some good middlewares that help manage side-effects in redux actions but they generally allow you to create actions creators that are vastly different then standard ones. I decided to make middleware with which you will be able to make action creators that will look consistent with the rest of the application and have all the other middlewares' power combined!

Are there good alternatives?

Yes and you should definitely check them out:

I found a bug! What should I do?

There are at least 3 options:

  1. Add an issue, write test(s) for bug you found, write fix that will make your test(s) pass, submit pull request
  2. Add an issue, write test(s) for bug you found, submit pull request with you test(s)
  3. Add an issue

All contributions are appreciated!

Getting started

Install library

npm i redux-better-promise --save

Apply middleware to redux store
import { createStore, applyMiddleware } from 'redux';
import createReduxPromise from 'redux-better-promise';

const store = createStore(
  rootReducer,
  applyMiddleware(createReduxPromise())
);

Usage

Simple async action creator
function getAsyncAction(param) {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

Dispatching action above will lead to dispatching following actions:

// before calling `promise` function
{
  type: 'ACTION_STARTED',
}

// after promise is resolved
{
  type: 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED',
  result: { some: 'data' },
}

If promise returned by promise function is rejected with { some: 'error' } second action will look like this

// after promise is rejected
{
  type: 'ACTION_ERROR',
  error: { some: 'error' },
}

Simple sync action with function

function getSyncAction(param) {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    function: ({ getState, dispatch }) => ({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

Dispatching action above will result in dispatching following actions:

// before `function` function is called
{
  type: 'ACTION_STARTED',
}

// after `function` returns result
{
  type: 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED',
  result: { some: 'data' },
}

If function throws a { some: 'error' } second action will look like this

// after throwing an error
{
  type: 'ACTION_ERROR',
  error: { some: 'error' },
}

Adding hooks to actions

Hooks are just functions triggered when particular action is going to be dispatched. They cannot modify dispatching process in any way but can be used to trigger custom actions on some actions (like showing notification when async actions fails)

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
    hooks: [() => notification('I started'), ({ result }) => notification('I finished successfully', result), () => notification('I failed :(')],
  };
}

When dispatching action above notification('I started') will be triggered immediately and notification('I finished successfully') will be triggered after promise resolves. notification('I failed') will not be triggered unless promise fails

Adding additional data to actions

Start, success and error actions can contain additional data e.g. payload

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
    payload: 'some payload',
    whatever: 'some other data',
  };
}

Here resulting actions would look like this:

// before calling `promise` function
{
  type: 'ACTION_STARTED',
  payload: 'some payload',
  whatever: 'some other data',
}

// after promise is resolved
{
  type: 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED',
  result: { some: 'data' },
  payload: 'some payload',
  whatever: 'some other data',
}

Passing lists as objects

types and hooks fields can be objects

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: { start: 'ACTION_STARTED', success: 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', error: 'ACTION_ERROR' },
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
    hooks: { start: () => notification('I started'), success: ({ result }) => notification('I finished successfully', result), error: () => notification('I failed :(') },
  };
}

Adding custom parameters that are going to passed to promise or function

By default promise and function functions will get { getState, dispatch } object as the first parameter. You can add any additional fields to that object:

const store = createStore(
  rootReducer,
  applyMiddleware(createReduxPromise({ myCustomParam: 'data', anotherData: 'value' }))
);

Now actions can look like this:

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch, myCustomParam: 'data', anotherData: 'value' }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

or

function getSyncAction() {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    function: ({ getState, dispatch, myCustomParam: 'data', anotherData: 'value' }) => ({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

Omitting some action types or hooks

You don't have to provide all action types or hooks

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: [null, null, 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.reject({ some: 'error' }),
    hooks: [() => notification('I started'), null, null],
  };
}

Now the only action dispatched will be 'ACTION_ERROR' (of course only if promise returned by promise function will be rejected) and only before calling promise function notification('I started') hook is going to be called

Providing only one action type

Instead of providing action with types field you can pass only one action type in type field:

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    type: 'ACTION_SUCCESS',
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.reject({ some: 'error' }),
  };
}

Now 'ACTION_SUCCESS' action would be triggered only if promise action resolves. So in this case no action is going to be dispatched.

Registering global hooks

Instead of adding hooks to each action you can add global ones in hooks field of a second argument of middlewareCreator:

import createReduxPromise, { actionTypes as reduxPromiseActionTypes } from 'redux-better-promise';

const store = createStore(
  rootReducer,
  applyMiddleware(createReduxPromise(null, { hooks: [
    ({ type, result, error, payload }) => console.log('I will be triggered on each and every action'),
    {
      actionType: reduxPromiseActionTypes.success,
      hook: ({ result }) => console.log('I will be triggered on every success action'),
    },
    {
      actionType: /^\w*ERROR$/,
      hook: ({ error }) => console.log('I will be triggered only on actions ending in "ERROR"'),
    },
    {
      actionType: (type, action) => !~(['ONE_ACTION', 'DIFFERENT_ACTION']).indexOf(type),
      hook: () => console.log('I will be triggered on all actions except ONE_ACTION and DIFFERENT_ACTION'),
    },
    {
      actionType: ['ONE_ACTION', 'DIFFERENT_ACTION'],
      hook: () => console.log('I will be triggered on ONE_ACTION and DIFFERENT_ACTION only'),
    }
  ] }))
);

You can also replace actionType with actionTypeExclude which will just inverts the behaviour of that field or even use both fields (the exclude field will overwrite the include filed):

import createReduxPromise, { actionTypes as reduxPromiseActionTypes } from 'redux-better-promise';

const store = createStore(
  rootReducer,
  applyMiddleware(createReduxPromise(null, { hooks: [
    ({ type, result, error, payload }) => console.log('I will be triggered on each and every action'), // note that global hooks gets `type` in the first parameter wheras per-action hooks do not
    {
      actionTypeExclude: reduxPromiseActionTypes.success,
      hook: ({ result }) => console.log('I will be triggered on every start and error action'),
    },
    {
      actionTypeExclude: /^\w*ERROR$/,
      hook: ({ error }) => console.log('I will be triggered only on actions not ending in "ERROR"'),
    },
    {
      actionTypeExclude: (type, action) => !~(['ONE_ACTION', 'DIFFERENT_ACTION']).indexOf(type),
      hook: () => console.log('I will be triggered on ONE_ACTION and DIFFERENT_ACTION only'),
    },
    {
      actionType: ['ONE_ACTION', 'DIFFERENT_ACTION'],
      actionTypeExclude: (type, action) => action.payload,
      hook: () => console.log('I will be triggered on ONE_ACTION and DIFFERENT_ACTION only if the do not have `payload` field'),
    }
  ] }))
);

There are different generic types in actionTypes named export object:

import { actionTypes } from 'redux-better-promise';

actionTypes.start;
actionTypes.success;
actionTypes.error;
actionTypes.finish; // success and error

Changing default field names

Most of the time it's better not to have fields named function in you code ;) You can change all default field names by providing any number of configFields as a second argument to middlewareCreator

const store = createStore(
  rootReducer,
  applyMiddleware(createReduxPromise(null, { functionFieldName: 'myNewName' }))
);

Now actions can look like this:

function getSyncAction() {
  return {
    types: ['ACTION_STARTED', 'ACTION_SUCCEEDED', 'ACTION_ERROR'],
    myNewName: ({ getState, dispatch }) => ({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

Your config object will be deeply merged with default options:

{
  promiseFieldName: 'promise',
  functionFieldName: 'function',
  typesFieldName: 'types',
  hooksFieldName: 'hooks',
  typesNames: { // used when types field is object
    start: 'start',
    success: 'success',
    error: 'error',
  },
  hooksNames: { // used when hooks field is object
    start: 'start',
    success: 'success',
    error: 'error',
  },
}

Note that you cannot change type field name!

Good practises

no-dispatch actions

Theoretically you could create actions that does not influence redux store. For example:

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

When dispatching action above no action will actually be dispatched on redux store. As using redux in this way doesn't make sense, actions that has neither types nor type field will throw an error when dispatched. Note that you still can make a workaround:

function getAsyncAction() {
  return {
    types: [ null, null, null ],
    promise: ({ getState, dispatch }) => Promise.resolve({ some: 'data' }),
  };
}

Although in this version such action will not throw an error it is generally bad idea to create it. Even with hooks, it's much better (and easier to reason about) when calling promise directly.

conditional dispatchers

As with redux-thunk or redux-saga you can create action that will conditionally dispatch other actions:

function getWrapperAction(makeItSo) {
  return {
    function: ({ dispatch }) => makeItSo ? dispatch(someOtherAction) : null,
  };
}

Most of the time it's not a good idea. It's probably better to just conditionally dispatch someOtherAction than to create wrapper action to do that for you.

Roadmap

  • Errors in success hooks should not be caught together with errors in function
  • Refactor tests (merge some tests and split others to make them more readable)

What's not going to be done

  • You will not be able to dynamically add hooks (like listeners) to actions (e.g. with middleware.addHook()) except in action creators. The power of redux is in the ability to quickly find the reason why something happened and adding dynamic listeners will make the code hard to understand.