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Merge branch 'version-14_01-branch'

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commit 655017bd1ab3ebeccd4dfa822e534bfacb26a3fc 2 parents 8174fa3 + f51cfd7
@juliensf juliensf authored
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41 library/io.m
@@ -382,22 +382,21 @@
% These will all throw an io.error exception if an I/O error occurs.
% io.print/3 writes its argument to the standard output stream.
- % io.print/4 writes its second argument to the output stream specified
- % in its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output can be
- % of any type. It is output in a format that is intended to be human
- % readable.
+ % io.print/4 writes its second argument to the output stream specified in
+ % its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output can be of any
+ % type. It is output in a format that is intended to be human readable.
%
% If the argument is just a single string or character, it will be printed
- % out exactly as is (unquoted). If the argument is of type univ, then
- % it will print out the value stored in the univ, but not the type.
+ % out exactly as is (unquoted). If the argument is of type univ, then it
+ % will print out the value stored in the univ, but not the type.
%
- % io.print/5 is the same as io.print/4 except that it allows the caller
- % to specify how non-canonical types should be handled. io.print/3 and
+ % io.print/5 is the same as io.print/4 except that it allows the caller to
+ % specify how non-canonical types should be handled. io.print/3 and
% io.print/4 implicitly specify `canonicalize' as the method for handling
- % non-canonical types. This means that for higher-order types, or types
+ % non-canonical types. This means that for higher-order types, or types
% with user-defined equality axioms, or types defined using the foreign
- % language interface (i.e. pragma foreign_type), the text output will
- % only describe the type that is being printed, not the value.
+ % language interface (i.e. pragma foreign_type), the text output will only
+ % describe the type that is being printed, not the value.
%
% io.print_cc/3 is the same as io.print/3 except that it specifies
% `include_details_cc' rather than `canonicalize'. This means that it will
@@ -441,18 +440,18 @@
% be valid Mercury syntax whenever possible.
%
% Strings and characters are always printed out in quotes, using backslash
- % escapes if necessary. For higher-order types, or for types defined
- % using the foreign language interface (pragma foreign_code), the text
- % output will only describe the type that is being printed, not the value,
- % and the result may not be parsable by `io.read'. For the types
- % containing existential quantifiers, the type `type_desc' and closure
- % types, the result may not be parsable by `io.read', either. But in all
- % other cases the format used is standard Mercury syntax, and if you append
- % a period and newline (".\n"), then the results can be read in again
- % using `io.read'.
+ % escapes if necessary. For higher-order types, or for types defined using
+ % the foreign language interface (pragma foreign_type), the text output
+ % will only describe the type that is being printed, not the value, and the
+ % result may not be parsable by `io.read'. For the types containing
+ % existential quantifiers, the type `type_desc' and closure types, the
+ % result may not be parsable by `io.read', either. But in all other cases
+ % the format used is standard Mercury syntax, and if you append a period
+ % and newline (".\n"), then the results can be read in again using
+ % `io.read'.
%
% io.write/5 is the same as io.write/4 except that it allows the caller
- % to specify how non-canonical types should be handled. io.write_cc/3
+ % to specify how non-canonical types should be handled. io.write_cc/3
% is the same as io.write/3 except that it specifies `include_details_cc'
% rather than `canonicalize'.
%
View
64 library/stream.string_writer.m
@@ -43,27 +43,26 @@
:- pred nl(Stream::in, State::di, State::uo) is det
<= stream.writer(Stream, string, State).
- % print/3 writes its argument to the standard output stream.
- % print/4 writes its second argument to the output stream specified
- % in its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output can be
- % of any type. It is output in a format that is intended to be human
+ % print/4 writes its second argument to the string writer stream specified
+ % in its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output can be of
+ % any type. It is output in a format that is intended to be human
% readable.
%
% If the argument is just a single string or character, it will be printed
- % out exactly as is (unquoted). If the argument is of type univ, then
- % it will print out the value stored in the univ, but not the type.
+ % out exactly as is (unquoted). If the argument is of type univ, then it
+ % will print out the value stored in the univ, but not the type.
%
- % print/5 is the same as print/4 except that it allows the caller
- % to specify how non-canonical types should be handled. print/3 and
- % print/4 implicitly specify `canonicalize' as the method for handling
- % non-canonical types. This means that for higher-order types, or types
- % with user-defined equality axioms, or types defined using the foreign
- % language interface (i.e. pragma foreign_type), the text output will
- % only describe the type that is being printed, not the value.
+ % print/5 is the same as print/4 except that it allows the caller to
+ % specify how non-canonical types should be handled. print/4 implicitly
+ % specifies `canonicalize' as the method for handling non-canonical types.
+ % This means that for higher-order types, or types with user-defined
+ % equality axioms, or types defined using the foreign language interface
+ % (i.e. pragma foreign_type), the text output will only describe the type
+ % that is being printed, not the value.
%
- % print_cc/3 is the same as print/3 except that it specifies
- % `include_details_cc' rather than `canonicalize'. This means that it will
- % print the details of non-canonical types. However, it has determinism
+ % print_cc/4 is the same as print/4 except that it specifies
+ % `include_details_cc' rather than `canonicalize'. This means that it will
+ % print the details of non-canonical types. However, it has determinism
% `cc_multi'.
%
% Note that even if `include_details_cc' is specified, some implementations
@@ -86,26 +85,25 @@
<= (stream.writer(Stream, string, State),
stream.writer(Stream, char, State)).
- % write/4 writes its second argument to the output stream specified
- % in its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output may be
- % of any type. The argument is written in a format that is intended to
- % be valid Mercury syntax whenever possible.
+ % write/4 writes its second argument to the string writer stream specified
+ % in its first argument. In all cases, the argument to output may be of
+ % any type. The argument is written in a format that is intended to be
+ % valid Mercury syntax whenever possible.
%
% Strings and characters are always printed out in quotes, using backslash
- % escapes if necessary. For higher-order types, or for types defined
- % using the foreign language interface (pragma foreign_code), the text
- % output will only describe the type that is being printed, not the value,
- % and the result may not be parsable by `read'. For the types
- % containing existential quantifiers, the type `type_desc' and closure
- % types, the result may not be parsable by `read', either. But in all
- % other cases the format used is standard Mercury syntax, and if you append
- % a period and newline (".\n"), then the results can be read in again
- % using `read'.
+ % escapes if necessary. For higher-order types, or for types defined using
+ % the foreign language interface (pragma foreign_type), the text output
+ % will only describe the type that is being printed, not the value, and the
+ % result may not be parsable by `read'. For the types containing
+ % existential quantifiers, the type `type_desc' and closure types, the
+ % result may not be parsable by `read', either. But in all other cases the
+ % format used is standard Mercury syntax, and if you append a period and
+ % newline (".\n"), then the results can be read in again using `read'.
%
- % write/5 is the same as write/4 except that it allows the caller
- % to specify how non-canonical types should be handled. write_cc/4
- % is the same as write/4 except that it specifies `include_details_cc'
- % rather than `canonicalize'.
+ % write/5 is the same as write/4 except that it allows the caller to
+ % specify how non-canonical types should be handled. write_cc/4 is the
+ % same as write/4 except that it specifies `include_details_cc' rather than
+ % `canonicalize'.
%
:- pred write(Stream::in, T::in, State::di, State::uo) is det
<= (stream.writer(Stream, string, State),
View
2  mfilterjavac/Mmakefile
@@ -137,6 +137,6 @@ realclean_local:
install: mfilterjavac
-[ -d $(INSTALL_MERC_BIN_DIR) ] || mkdir -p $(INSTALL_MERC_BIN_DIR)
cp `vpath_find mfilterjavac$(EXT_FOR_EXE)` \
- $(INSTALL_MERC_BIN_DIR)/mfilterjavac
+ $(INSTALL_MERC_BIN_DIR)/mfilterjavac$(EXT_FOR_EXE)
#-----------------------------------------------------------------------------#
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