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Skip build if there's [skip ci] in the commit message. #858

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KelvinJin opened this issue Mar 15, 2017 · 56 comments
Closed

Skip build if there's [skip ci] in the commit message. #858

KelvinJin opened this issue Mar 15, 2017 · 56 comments

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@KelvinJin
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@KelvinJin KelvinJin commented Mar 15, 2017

Hey, just wonder if there's a way I can skip a build if [skip ci] or something exists in the commit message. I know we have branch filters and path filters, but commit message filter would be nice to have if I just commit something really tiny.

@ericsciple
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@ericsciple ericsciple commented Mar 15, 2017

i think as long as the commit message contains NO_CI then it will skip

@ericsciple
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@ericsciple ericsciple commented Mar 15, 2017

***NO_CI***

@KelvinJin
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@KelvinJin KelvinJin commented Mar 15, 2017

Aha, good to know. It worked. Thanks!

@KelvinJin KelvinJin closed this Mar 15, 2017
@marceloavf
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@marceloavf marceloavf commented Oct 27, 2017

Basically most of the others CI use [ci skip] or [skip ci] (e.g. Travis, CircleCI, Concourse)

Some dependencies use [ci skip] as a pattern to skip automatically versioning from their CI, why not make VSTS also accept it?

@masters3d
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@masters3d masters3d commented Feb 21, 2018

Come Vote here for additional spellings.

@chrislampley
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@chrislampley chrislampley commented Oct 26, 2018

@ericsciple ***NO_CI*** does not work for Azure Pipelines

@davekenn
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@davekenn davekenn commented Oct 26, 2018

@chrislampley can you please point me at your account and build, I am curious why it didn't work for you?
You can message me privately if you don't want to share your account information:
daveken@microsoft.com

@chrislampley
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@chrislampley chrislampley commented Oct 26, 2018

@ericsciple PM sent.

@davekenn
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@davekenn davekenn commented Oct 27, 2018

Although I am not Eric, he is just a few feet away from me, we will take a look and get back to you, thanks!

@ericsciple
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@ericsciple ericsciple commented Oct 29, 2018

@chrislampley sorry I didn't see any message or I missed it

@rauljmz
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@rauljmz rauljmz commented Dec 11, 2018

***NO_CI*** is also not working for me on Azure Pipelines. Getting endless recursive builds. Is there a solution?

@TingluoHuang
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@TingluoHuang TingluoHuang commented Dec 11, 2018

@rauljmz can you provide more detail info?
what's your Azure DevOps account?
what's your definition looks like, the trigger section?
how did you provide the ***NO_CI*** string?

@rauljmz
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@rauljmz rauljmz commented Dec 11, 2018

@TingluoHuang the DevOps account is CluedIn-io. The trigger section is picked up from the YML file and is simply

trigger:
- develop
- master

The original intention is for the pipeline to make an extra commit to the master branch during build. This should not trigger a new build, but despite the ***NO_CI*** flag being in the commit message, it does (causing constant builds).
I have also tried simply pushing a commit manually with the flag too, that also triggers a build.
I have tried putting ***NO_CI*** in the beginning, in the end, with square brackets... running out of options!

@TingluoHuang
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@TingluoHuang TingluoHuang commented Dec 11, 2018

@rauljmz if you manually (not during your build) commit a change with ***NO_CI*** in commit message and push it to master, will it trigger a CI build?

@rauljmz
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@rauljmz rauljmz commented Dec 11, 2018

@TingluoHuang Yes it does - I tried that too.

@TingluoHuang
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@TingluoHuang TingluoHuang commented Dec 11, 2018

@rauljmz i can repro myself, can you share some screenshot of how do you made the commit message?
this is my message looks like:
image

@rauljmz
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@rauljmz rauljmz commented Dec 11, 2018

@TingluoHuang Of course.
image
The last two, Rev.42 is manual commit and push, Rev.43 is the one generated by the automated commit in the pipeline. Both have ***NO_CI*** yet triggered a pipeline.

The yaml file does this:

  - task: Bash@3
    displayName: 'Commit changes to repo'
    condition: and(succeeded(), eq(variables['Build.SourceBranch'], 'refs/heads/master'))
    inputs:
      targetType: 'inline'
      script: "git checkout master; git add docs; git commit -m '[***NO_CI***] Pushed new packaged version of helm chart';git push;"

@TingluoHuang
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@TingluoHuang TingluoHuang commented Dec 11, 2018

@madhurig
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@madhurig madhurig commented Dec 14, 2018

@rauljmz - it appears you are using the Azure Pipelines GitHub app. This is currently a limitation when using the GitHub app and it is something we plan to address.

If you are making commits via the script under a particular folder of in a specific file, you can use PATH filters as a workaround to avoid triggering builds for changes in the specific file or under that folder. E.g. add something like this in your yml file

trigger: branches: include: - master paths: exclude: - docs/*

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/devops/pipelines/build/triggers?view=vsts&tabs=yaml

If that workaround is not something you can apply, you can switch to using PAT or OAuth for authenticating with GitHub. One of the downsides of that is that you won't get checks but will see a status update from the Azure pipelines results.

Thanks,
Madhuri

@rauljmz
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@rauljmz rauljmz commented Dec 15, 2018

@madhurig
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@madhurig madhurig commented Dec 17, 2018

@rauljmz - thanks for the update. We are working on improvements in the app flow and pipeline creation so the app would be the default way to create pipelines whenever possible.

Thanks,
Madhuri

@nickromano
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@nickromano nickromano commented Jan 24, 2019

Another option if you're using YAML builds: create a condition for that step to only run if [skip ci] isn't in the commit message. Unfortunately, you can't do this at the job level because it hasn't pulled sources yet so Build.SourceVersionMessage is null. You'll need to copy it to each step in your pipeline.

steps:
  - bash: echo "Run tests"
    condition: not(contains(variables['Build.SourceVersionMessage'], '[skip ci]'))

@mloskot
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@mloskot mloskot commented Jan 25, 2019

Vote for Add support [ci skip] and [azure skip] to Azure Pipelines on the Developer Community

@davidstaheli
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@davidstaheli davidstaheli commented Mar 22, 2019

This is available now. You can tell Azure Pipelines to skip running a pipeline that a commit would normally trigger. Just include [skip ci] in the commit message or description of the HEAD commit and Azure Pipelines will skip running CI. You can also use any of the variations below. This is supported for commits to Azure Repos Git, Bitbucket Cloud, GitHub, and GitHub Enterprise Server.

  • [skip ci] or [ci skip]
  • skip-checks: true or skip-checks:true
  • [skip azurepipelines] or [azurepipelines skip]
  • [skip azpipelines] or [azpipelines skip]
  • [skip azp] or [azp skip]
  • ***NO_CI***

@DirtRanchers
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@DirtRanchers DirtRanchers commented Nov 20, 2019

@madhurig said (Jun 11, 2019):

@pllim - PR builds are always run, [skip ci] only skips CI builds.

Yes....we know that's how it works--but many of us are on this thread because the way it works today for PRs is not what we expect or want. We are voicing our request for a fix, or at least a workaround. You imply that "it's working as designed,"--we are stating that the behavior is undesirable, regardless of whether it was by design or by oversight.

What this causes for me is that I have to forego a PR, and instead temporarily disable all policies on my master branch, commit my changes directly to master, and then re-enable all policies. It's a pain, and it's dangerous. I want the PR because I want a code review!

(btw, I confirmed again today that the problem still exists)
image

@bddckr
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@bddckr bddckr commented Nov 20, 2019

If the feature of allowing pipeline skipping is added it is dangerous to me. My policies have to be upheld and I can not allow anyone to ignore them in my team.

So if this new feature ever gets added please ensure it's behind a setting (that I'd argue should be off by default as a policy is no longer a policy if there's a default way to never adhere to it).

@mloskot
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@mloskot mloskot commented Nov 20, 2019

@bddckr If someone in your team adds [ci skip], you can catch it during review and request to fix the commit and re(force)-push.

People have valid reasons to skip CI-s for PRs. There is no need for babysitting.

It would be good if Azure Pipelines aligns with the the CI-s that have been hear for longer, Travis CI and AppVeyor, and set de-facto behavioural standards.

@bddckr
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@bddckr bddckr commented Nov 20, 2019

I'm using tools to remove the human error out of the equation. I can adjust my pipeline to break the build if running in a PR with a CI skip commit, as well as you can just make yours return early and do nothing if such a commit is the sole reason the pipeline is running.

At the end of the day we're in the same boat. Your use case is as valid as mine. I'm just asking to keep functionality as is while new features might get added. Breaking behavior with a feature addition (or change) is a concern that I just wanted to state here and can't be in anyone's interest :)

@DirtRanchers
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@DirtRanchers DirtRanchers commented Nov 20, 2019

@bddckr, technically you can't break your build with a functioning CI skip, because the build won't be triggered in the first place. :-) (but I understand your point)
I'd be fine with them adding a setting called "recognize CI skip on PR commits", and even fine if it were off by default. Hopefully, it won't be at the pipeline level, because we have literally dozens of pipelines triggered by a single PR.

@bddckr
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@bddckr bddckr commented Nov 20, 2019

At the policy level makes the most sense to me, it's not about the pipeline really I'd say. Together with cross-repo policies one can create nowadays that actually allows the setup to be relatively quick, even among multiple repos.

Btw I tried to find this restriction to only allow skipping CI builds, instead of PR builds on the docs page here but it doesn't state skipping at all in the PR section. It might be worth opening a ticket with the docs there to ensure this is documented. Until hopefully added as an option - at which point that added feature should be explained.

@BoazWarshawsky
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@BoazWarshawsky BoazWarshawsky commented Nov 23, 2019

Is there a way to get the git commit message so I can use it as condition?
This one is not working:
not(contains(variables['Build.SourceVersionMessage'], '[skip ci]'))

Build.SourceVersionMessage returns some commit id.

@jeliasson
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@jeliasson jeliasson commented Nov 24, 2019

Build.SourceVersionMessage returns some commit id.

Are you sure? My condition work just fine.
See predefined variables where you can read on Build.SourceVersionMessage.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/devops/pipelines/build/variables?view=azure-devops&tabs=yaml

@BoazWarshawsky
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@BoazWarshawsky BoazWarshawsky commented Nov 24, 2019

@jeliasson I am 99% sure, what I tried to running this line:
echo $(Build.SourceVersionMessage)
and what I got is:
Merge d66b422899c095fffeeb6a1448a0af113e0eab7f into d58ad52ba31cc0d11be346d23f491e8b0793fefa

Instead of my commit message.

What am I doing wrong here?

@jeliasson
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@jeliasson jeliasson commented Nov 24, 2019

Merge d66b422899c095fffeeb6a1448a0af113e0eab7f into d58ad52ba31cc0d11be346d23f491e8b0793fefa
Instead of my commit message

That sounds very wierd, and almost like a squash commit with a automated custom message. Could you please check your commit history and verify that is in fact not your commit message?

If it isn’t, I’ll have another check on my pipeline on my computer.

@ihnorton
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@ihnorton ihnorton commented Nov 26, 2019

It is very strange that this feature skips CI build if any commit in the history has one of the indicator strings. This means, for example, that backporting a commit with [ci skip] onto a release branch skips CI for that branch even if the following 10 commits are un-skipped. Travis only skips if the most recent commit contains the skip indicator.

@andrejohansson
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@andrejohansson andrejohansson commented Jan 21, 2020

How did anyone here get this to work?

I push a change to my npm package, this package itself builds, updates the version of package.json and then pushes the tag and version update with a [skip ci] comment. But still...pipelines gets stuck in an infinite loop. We do not use PRs or anything else.

My yaml file trigger looks like this:

trigger:
- master

image

@laike9m
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@laike9m laike9m commented Oct 31, 2020

Is this feature documented somewhere other than the comments? I can't seem to find it.

@laike9m
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@laike9m laike9m commented Oct 31, 2020

Unless I'm misunderstanding something, this feature does not work for me.

Here's my CI run:
https://dev.azure.com/laike9m/laike9m/_build/results?buildId=328&view=results

It was triggered by two commits, which all had [skip ci] in the commit message.
https://github.com/laike9m/Cyberbrain/pull/66/commits

image

Can someone help me take a look?

@Vic152
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@Vic152 Vic152 commented Nov 20, 2020

This does not work.

@whenmoon
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@whenmoon whenmoon commented Feb 2, 2021

This does not work. Or at least in a way that would be useful to me. I want to be able to stop any build pipelines, not just certain ones.

My scenario is that I commit to a branch when a pipeline runs - this pipeline is triggered by a branch policy when a PR is made to validate the build. But when pushing the commit the pipeline triggers itself and then fails because the previous run committed changes to what the pipeline itself requires. These flags are of no use to me and do not fulfil my requirement.

The issue shouldn't be closed because adding [skip ci] doesn't always skip ci.

@SlasherZet
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@SlasherZet SlasherZet commented Feb 24, 2021

FYI I think this requires the [skip ci] to be on its own commit line in the commit message. It did not work for me when it was on the same line as the release version like this:
"Release version 0.1.5 [skip ci]"

But when I tried it with commit like this it worked fine and CI was skipped:
"Release version 0.1.5
[skip ci]"

@xram
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@xram xram commented Mar 22, 2021

I tried what @SlasherZet has suggested, but the CI build still ran. My commit message was:

chore (release): publish v4.7.2
[skip ci]

@pllim
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@pllim pllim commented Mar 22, 2021

FWIW [skip ci] works on GitHub Actions.

@vany0114
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@vany0114 vany0114 commented Jun 2, 2021

@BoazWarshawsky

jeliasson I am 99% sure, what I tried to running this line:
echo $(Build.SourceVersionMessage)
and what I got is:
Merge d66b422899c095fffeeb6a1448a0af113e0eab7f into d58ad52ba31cc0d11be346d23f491e8b0793fefa

Instead of my commit message.

What am I doing wrong here?

Did you manage to sort that out? I'm running into exactly the same issue

@LasithaPrabodha
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@LasithaPrabodha LasithaPrabodha commented Oct 13, 2021

Use [ci skip]. Works for me

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