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Please explain why YAML pipelines are the default vs Classic #5114

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IanKemp opened this issue Aug 2, 2019 — with docs.microsoft.com · 4 comments
Closed

Please explain why YAML pipelines are the default vs Classic #5114

IanKemp opened this issue Aug 2, 2019 — with docs.microsoft.com · 4 comments

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@IanKemp IanKemp commented Aug 2, 2019 — with docs.microsoft.com

The YAML pipelines flow is substandard in every way to the Classic flow. Classic is simpler, easier to setup, doesn't require me to write and test and debug a text file, and covers 99.99% of use cases, yet it is seemingly being sidelined in favour of YAML - why? What benefit(s) does YAML give over Classic, apart from the fact that you can version YAML (but you could probably implement pipeline versioning into Classic anyway)? How do I setup separate Build and Release pipelines in the YAML flow?

It seems that YAML pipelines were introduced as the Next Big Thing and made default without any consideration for those who are used to the Classic flow. If you want YAML to succeed and more importantly, for Classic users to migrate to it, you absolutely need a walkthrough document that takes a project with Classic build and release pipelines, and converts them it to the azure-pipelines.yaml format. Yes I know that theoretically this is as simple as copying the generated YAML from the various Classic pipeline phases, but you need to know that...

Furthermore, why are Release pipelines not being pushed to use a YAML file?


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@Swimburger

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@Swimburger Swimburger commented Aug 7, 2019

@IanKemp I agree that Classic is still the way to go since YAML is missing some important features.
Some of these features are on the roadmap though (blog post).

As you mentioned YAML have the advantage of being part of your source code. In addition to that it's just a text file that I can more easily share with my team, or write about in blog posts.
I'm currently working on an Azure DevOps article, and it's so much easier to share the YAML file vs taking screenshots for every step to create the pipeline. This is also a huge benefit for open source projects to share their build/deployments with their community.

I think it's good YAML will become the standard but I agree that Microsoft may be jumping the gun here. For YAML to become the standard, the visual building interface and functionality should exceed Classic.
Especially when it comes to release pipelines YAML has a long way to go which is why I use YAML for builds, but classic for releases.

@WilliamAntonRohm

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@WilliamAntonRohm WilliamAntonRohm commented Aug 7, 2019

It looks like you've encountered an issue with the product itself, rather than an issue with the documentation. To make sure it gets in front of the right people, please submit your bug here.

@gstevens-kyriba

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@gstevens-kyriba gstevens-kyriba commented Dec 31, 2019

I totally concur on this feedback... Why mark Release Pipelines as (Classic) when there isnt a viable replacement yet?

@jedjohan

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@jedjohan jedjohan commented Jan 18, 2020

I totally concur on this feedback... Why mark Release Pipelines as (Classic) when there isnt a viable replacement yet?

In my opinion YAML is very much a viable replacement now (since a few months back). Just doing "normal" devops stuff and multistage pipelines works great for both build and release (database, frontend and backend).

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