Use Vagrant to manage your Cosmic or Cloudstack instances.
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README.md

Vagrant Cloudstack Provider

Build Status Gem Version Code climate Coverage Status BCH compliance

This is a fork of mitchellh AWS Provider.

This is a Vagrant 1.5+ plugin that adds a Cloudstack provider to Vagrant for use with either Cosmic or Cloudstack.

Features

  • SSH into the instances.
  • Provision the instances with any built-in Vagrant provisioner.
  • Minimal synced folder support via rsync/winrm.

Usage

Install using standard Vagrant 1.1+ plugin installation methods. After installing, vagrant up and specify the cloudstack provider. An example is shown below.

$ vagrant plugin install vagrant-cloudstack
...
$ vagrant up --provider=cloudstack
...

Quick Start

After installing the plugin (instructions above), the quickest way to get started is to actually make a Vagrantfile that looks like the following, filling in your information where necessary.

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  config.vm.box = "${cloudstack.template_name}"

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack, override|
    cloudstack.host = "cloudstack.local"
    cloudstack.path = "/client/api"
    cloudstack.port = "8080"
    cloudstack.scheme = "http"
    cloudstack.api_key = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

    cloudstack.service_offering_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.disk_offering_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.network_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.zone_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.project_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
  end
end

Or with names instead of ids:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  config.vm.box = "${cloudstack.template_name}"

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack, override|
    cloudstack.host = "cloudstack.local"
    cloudstack.path = "/client/api"
    cloudstack.port = "8080"
    cloudstack.scheme = "http"
    cloudstack.api_key = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

    cloudstack.service_offering_name = "THE-BESTEST"
    cloudstack.disk_offering_name = "THE-LARGEST-OFFER-AVAILABLE"
    cloudstack.network_name = "WOW-SUCH-FAST-OFFERING"
    cloudstack.zone_name = "District-9"
    cloudstack.name = "doge-is-a-hostname-now"
    # Sadly there is currently no support for the project api in fog.
    cloudstack.project_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
  end
end

And then run vagrant up --provider=cloudstack.

This will start an instance in Cloudstack. And assuming your template on Cloudstack is Vagrant compatible (vagrant user with official vagrant pub key in authorized_keys) SSH and provisioning will work as well.

Configuration

This provider exposes quite a few provider-specific configuration options. Most of the settings have both an id and a name setting and you can chose to use either (i.e network_id or network_name). This gives the possibility to use the easier to remember name instead of the UUID, this will also enable you to upgrade the different settings in your cloud without having to update UUIDs in your Vagrantfile. If both are specified, the id parameter takes precedence.

  • name - Hostname of the created machine
  • host - Cloudstack api host
  • path - Cloudstack api path
  • port - Cloudstack api port
  • scheme - Cloudstack api scheme (defaults: https (thanks to the resolution order in fog))
  • api_key - The api key for accessing Cloudstack
  • secret_key - The secret key for accessing Cloudstack
  • instance_ready_timeout - The number of seconds to wait for the instance to become "ready" in Cloudstack. Defaults to 120 seconds.
  • domain_id - Domain id to launch the instance into
  • network_id - Network uuid(s) that the instance should use
    • network_id is single value (e.g. "AAAA") or multiple values (e.g. ["AAAA", "BBBB"])
  • network_name - Network name(s) that the instance should use
    • network_name is single value (e.g. "AAAA") or multiple values (e.g. ["AAAA", "BBBB"])
  • project_id - Project uuid that the instance should belong to
  • service_offering_id- Service offering uuid to use for the instance
  • service_offering_name- Service offering name to use for the instance
  • template_id - Template uuid to use for the instance
  • template_name - Template name to use for the instance, defaults to Vagrants config.vm.box
  • zone_id - Zone uuid to launch the instance into
  • zone_name - Zone uuid to launch the instance into
  • keypair - SSH keypair name, if neither'keypair' nor 'ssh_key' have been specified, a temporary keypair will be created
  • static_nat - static nat for the virtual machine
  • pf_ip_address_id - IP address ID for port forwarding rule
  • pf_ip_address - IP address for port forwarding rule
  • pf_public_port - Public Communicator port for port forwarding rule
  • pf_public_rdp_port - Public RDP port for port forwarding rule
  • pf_public_port_randomrange - If public port is omited, a port from this range wll be used (default {:start=>49152, :end=>65535})
  • pf_private_port - Private port for port forwarding rule (defaults to respective Communicator protocol)
  • pf_open_firewall - Flag to enable/disable automatic open firewall rule (by CloudStack)
  • pf_trusted_networks - Array of CIDRs or (array of) comma-separated string of CIDRs to network(s) to
    • automatically (by plugin) generate firewall rules for, ignored if pf_open_firewall set true
    • use as default for firewall rules where source CIDR is missing
  • port_forwarding_rules - Port forwarding rules for the virtual machine
  • firewall_rules - Firewall rules
  • display_name - Display name for the instance
  • group - Group for the instance
  • ssh_key - Path to a private key to be used with ssh (defaults to Vagrant's config.ssh.private_key_path)
  • ssh_user - User name to be used with ssh (defaults to Vagrant's config.ssh.username)
  • ssh_network_id - The network_id to be used when loging in to the vm via ssh (defaults to first nic)
  • ssh_network_name - The network_name to be used when loging in to the vm via ssh (defaults to first nic)
    • Use either ssh_network_id or ssh_network_name. If specified both , use ssh_network_id
  • vm_user - User name to be used with winrm (defaults to Vagrant's config.winrm.username)
  • vm_password - Password to be used with winrm. (If the CloudStack template is "Password Enabled", leaving this unset will trigger the plugin to retrieve and use it.)
  • private_ip_address - private (static)ip address to be used by the virtual machine
  • expunge_on_destroy - Flag to enable/disable expunge vm on destroy

These can be set like typical provider-specific configuration:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.api_key = "foo"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "bar"
  end
end

In addition to the above top-level configs, you can use the region_config method to specify region-specific overrides within your Vagrantfile. Note that the top-level region config must always be specified to choose which region you want to actually use, however. This looks like this:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.api_key = "foo"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "bar"
    cloudstack.domain = "internal"

    # Simple domain config
    cloudstack.domain_config "internal", :network_id => "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

    # More comprehensive region config
    cloudstack.domain_config "internal" do |domain|
      domain.network_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
      domain.service_offering_id = "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"
    end
  end
end

The domain-specific configurations will override the top-level configurations when that domain is used. They otherwise inherit the top-level configurations, as you would probably expect.

Networks

Networking features in the form of config.vm.network are not supported with vagrant-cloudstack, currently. If any of these are specified, Vagrant will emit a warning, but will otherwise boot the Cloudstack machine.

Basic networking versus Advanced networking

The plugin will determine this network type dynamically from the zone. The setting network_type in the Vagrant file has been deprecated, and is silently ignored.

Basic Networking

If the network type of your zone is basic, you can use Security Groups and associate rules in your Vagrantfile.

If you already have Security Groups, you can associate them to your instance, with their IDs:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.api_key = "foo"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "bar"
    cloudstack.security_group_ids = ['aaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd', '1111-2222-3333-4444']
  end
end

or their names:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.api_key = "foo"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "bar"
    cloudstack.security_group_names = ['
min_fantastiska_security_group', 'another_security_grupp']
  end
end

But you can also create your Security Groups in the Vagrantfile:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.api_key = "foo"
    cloudstack.secret_key = "bar"
    cloudstack.security_groups = [
      {
        :name         => "Awesome_security_group",
        :description  => "Created from the Vagrantfile",
          :rules => [
        {:type => "ingress", :protocol => "TCP", :startport => 22, :endport => 22, :cidrlist => "0.0.0.0/0"},
        {:type => "ingress", :protocol => "TCP", :startport => 80, :endport => 80, :cidrlist => "0.0.0.0/0"},
        {:type => "egress",  :protocol => "TCP", :startport => 81, :endport => 82, :cidrlist => "1.2.3.4/24"},
    ]
      }
    ]
  end
end

Static NAT, Firewall, Port forwarding

You can create your static nat, firewall and port forwarding rules in the Vagrantfile. You can use this rule to access virtual machine from an external machine.

The rules created in Vagrantfile are removed when the virtual machine is destroyed.

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|

    override.ssh.host = "X.X.X.X"

    cloudstack.static_nat = [
      { :ipaddress => "A.A.A.A"}
    ]

    cloudstack.port_forwarding_rules = [
      { :ipaddress => "X.X.X.X", :protocol => "tcp", :publicport => 22, :privateport  => 22, :openfirewall => false },
      { :ipaddress => "X.X.X.X", :protocol => "tcp", :publicport => 80, :privateport  => 80, :openfirewall => false }
    ]

    cloudstack.firewall_rules = [
      { :ipaddress => "A.A.A.A", :cidrlist  => "1.2.3.4/24", :protocol => "icmp", :icmptype => 8, :icmpcode => 0 },
      { :ipaddress => "X.X.X.X", :cidrlist  => "1.2.3.4/24", :protocol => "tcp", :startport => 22, :endport => 22 },
      { :ipaddress => "X.X.X.X", :cidrlist  => "1.2.3.4/24", :protocol => "tcp", :startport => 80, :endport => 80 }
    ]

  end
end

Most values in the firewall and portforwarding rules are not mandatory, except either startport/endport or privateport/publicport

  • :ipaddress - defaults to pf_ip_address
  • :protocol - defaults to 'tcp'
  • :publicport - defaults to :privateport
  • :privateport - defaults to :publicport
  • :openfirewall - defaults to pf_open_firewall
  • :cidrlist - defaults to pf_trusted_networks
  • :startport - defaults to :endport
  • :endport - not required by CloudStack

For only allowing Vagrant to access the box for further provisioning (SSH/WinRM), and opening the Firewall for some subnets, the following config is sufficient:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    cloudstack.pf_open_firewall      = "false"
    cloudstack.pf_ip_address         = X.X.X.X
    cloudstack.pf_trusted_networks   = [ "1.2.3.4/24" , "11.22.33.44/32" ]
  end
end

Where X.X.X.X is the ip of the respective CloudStack network, this will automatically map the port of the used Communicator (SSH/Winrm) via a random public port, open the Firewall and set Vagrant to use it.

The plugin can also automatically generate firewall rules off of the portforwarding rules:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|

    cloudstack.pf_trusted_networks   = "1.2.3.4/24,11.22.33.44/32"
    cloudstack.port_forwarding_rules = [
      { :privateport  => 22, :generate_firewall => true },
      { :privateport  => 80, :generate_firewall => true }
    ]

  end
end

Virtual Router versus VPC

Both Virtual Routers and VPCs are supported when using port-forwarding and firewall. This is automatically determined by the specific pf_ip_address.

Note that there are architectural differences in CloudStack which the configuration must adhere to.

For VPC:

  • pf_open_firewall will be ignored as global setting and (specifically) in port_forwarding_rules
  • for firewall_rules to open access for port_forwarding_rules, the firewall rule should allow traffic for the :privateport port.

For Virtual Router:

  • for firewall_rules to open access for port_forwarding_rules, the firewall rule should allow traffic for the :publicport port.

Usage of other attributes and features work with both network types. Such as :generate_firewall for portforwarding rules, or pf_trusted_networks to automatically generate rules for the Communicator.

Synced Folders

There is minimal support for synced folders. Upon vagrant up, vagrant reload, and vagrant provision, the Cloudstack provider will use rsync (if available) to uni-directionally sync the folder to the remote machine over SSH, and use Vagrant plugin vagrant-winrm-syncedfolders (if available) to uni-directionally sync the folder to the remote machine over WinRM.

This is good enough for all built-in Vagrant provisioners (shell, chef, and puppet) to work!

User data

You can specify user data for the instance being booted.

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
  # ... other stuff

  config.vm.provider :cloudstack do |cloudstack|
    # Option 1: a single string
    cloudstack.user_data = "#!/bin/bash\necho 'got user data' > /tmp/user_data.log\necho"

    # Option 2: use a file
    cloudstack.user_data = File.read("user_data.txt")
  end
end

The maximum length of user_data is around 1500 bytes with Cloudstack API < 4.2 (base64 encoded user_data must be < 2048 bytes)

Development

To work on the vagrant-cloudstack plugin, clone this repository out, and use Bundler to get the dependencies:

$ bundle

Once you have the dependencies, verify the unit tests pass with rake:

$ bundle exec rake

If the unit-tests pass, verify the plugin is functionaly good by running the functional tests with bats. Before running the tests you need to export a set of variables that are used in the tests. Look at the Rake file for the required variables, or run the following Rake command to check:

bundle exec rake functional_tests:check_environment

Run all functional tests by executing:

bundle exec rake functional_tests:all

If those pass, you're ready to start developing the plugin. You can test the plugin without installing it into your Vagrant environment by just creating a Vagrantfile in the top level of this directory (it is gitignored) and add the following line to your Vagrantfile

Vagrant.require_plugin "vagrant-cloudstack"

Use bundler to execute Vagrant:

$ bundle exec vagrant up --provider=cloudstack