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docs: More tweaking and cross-referencing

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1 parent 43e4d96 commit af94868bd50a2c34cd7021505d38d07ea300cf45 @oleg-alexandrov oleg-alexandrov committed Dec 26, 2013
Showing with 61 additions and 46 deletions.
  1. +2 −1 docs/book/correlation.tex
  2. +17 −11 docs/book/examples.tex
  3. +3 −9 docs/book/stereodefault.tex
  4. +39 −25 docs/book/tutorial.tex
@@ -9,7 +9,8 @@ \chapter{Stereo Correlation}
The goal of this chapter is to build an intuition for the stereo
correlation process. This will help users to identify unusual results
in their \acp{DEM} and hopefully eliminate them by tuning various
-parameters in the \texttt{stereo.default} file. For scientists and
+parameters in the \texttt{stereo.default} file (appendix
+\ref{ch:stereodefault}). For scientists and
engineers who are using \acp{DEM} produced with the Stereo Pipeline, this
chapter may help to answer the question, ``What is the Stereo Pipeline
doing to the raw data to produce this \ac{DEM}?''
View
@@ -257,7 +257,8 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file should apply well to HiRISE. Just set
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+should apply well to HiRISE. Just set
\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{none} or \texttt{homography} if
using map-projected imagery. If you are not using map-projected
imagery, set \texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
@@ -317,8 +318,9 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file works generally well with all CTX
-pairs. Just set \texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+works generally well with all CTX pairs. Just set
+\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
\texttt{affineepipolar}.
\clearpage
@@ -382,8 +384,9 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file works generally well with all MOC-NA
-pairs. Just set \texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+works generally well with all MOC-NA pairs. Just set
+\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
\texttt{none} when using projected imagery. If using non-projected use
\texttt{homography} or \texttt{affineepipolar}.
@@ -565,8 +568,9 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file works generally well with all Apollo
-pairs. Just set \texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+works generally well with all Apollo pairs. Just set
+\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{homography} or
\texttt{affineepipolar}.
%% \pagebreak
@@ -819,9 +823,10 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file works generally well with all GeoEye
-pairs. Just set \texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{affineepipolar}
-or \texttt{homography}.
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+works generally well with all GeoEye pairs. Just set
+\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{affineepipolar} or
+\texttt{homography}.
\section{Dawn (FC) Framing Camera}
@@ -875,6 +880,7 @@ \subsubsection*{Commands}
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
-The stereo.default example file worked for this stereo pair. Just set
+The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault})
+works well for this stereo pair. Just set
\texttt{alignment-method} to \texttt{affineepipolar} or
\texttt{homography}.
@@ -8,15 +8,9 @@ \chapter{The {\tt stereo.default} File}
file using the \texttt{-s} option. Run \texttt{stereo -\/-help} for
more information. The extension is not important for this file.
-Below we will walk through the contents of the \texttt{stereo.default}
-and discuss its various parameters. If you want to start with a clean
-slate, you can copy the \texttt{stereo.default.example} file that is
-included in the top level of the Stereo Pipeline software distribution.
-
-Note: The parameters that begin with `\texttt{DO\_*}' are true/false
-options, when set to `1' they are `on' or `true,' and if set to `0'
-they are `off' or `false.' All parameters below have their default
-values listed after the parameter name.
+A sample \texttt{stereo.default.example} file is included in the
+\texttt{examples/} directory of the Stereo Pipeline software
+distribution.
% -------------------------------------------------------------------
% PREPROCESSING
View
@@ -35,15 +35,9 @@ \section{Quick Start}
More details are provided in section \ref{visualising}.
-All files output by Stereo Pipeline will start with the same prefix,
-which above was set to \texttt{\textit{stereo-output}}. If it is desired
-that the outputs go to a subdirectory, specify it as part of the
-prefix. For example, using \texttt{\textit{results/run}} for the output
-prefix, will ensure that all files are in the \texttt{\textit{results/}} directory.
-
\section{Preparing the Data}
-The data set that is used in the tutorial and examples below is a
+The dataset that is used in the tutorial and examples below is a
pair of Mars Orbital Camera (\ac{MOC}) \citep{1992JGR....97.7699M,2001JGR...10623429M}
images whose \ac{PDS} Product IDs are M01/00115 and E02/01461.
This data can be downloaded from the PDS directly, or they can be
@@ -98,8 +92,8 @@ \subsection{Aligning Images}
\label{sec:AligningImages}
The images also need to be rectified (or aligned). There are many
-ways to do this (see using \texttt{alignment-method} in \texttt{stereo}'s
-\texttt{stereo.default} file in section
+ways to do this (for example, by setting \texttt{alignment-method} in \texttt{stereo}'s
+\texttt{stereo.default} file, as described in section
\ref{settingoptionsinstereodefault}). The most straightforward
process is to align the images by map-projecting them in \ac{ISIS}.
This example continues with the files from above, \texttt{E0201461.cub}
@@ -221,16 +215,16 @@ \subsection{Setting Options in the \texttt{stereo.default} File}
contents can be altered for your needs; details are found in appendix
\ref{ch:stereodefault} on page \pageref{ch:stereodefault}. You may find
it useful to save multiple versions of the \texttt{stereo.default} file
-for various processing needs. If you do this, be sure to specify a
-configuration file by invoking \texttt{stereo} with the \texttt{-s}
+for various processing needs. If you do this, be sure to specify the desired
+settings file by invoking \texttt{stereo} with the \texttt{-s}
option. If this option is not given, the \texttt{stereo} program will
search for a file named \texttt{stereo.default} in the current working
directory. If \texttt{stereo} does not find \texttt{stereo.default} in
the current working directory and no file was given with the \texttt{-s}
option, \texttt{stereo} will assume default settings and continue.
-The example \texttt{stereo.default.example} file distributed in the
-base directory of \ac{ASP} has everything you need to process this
+The \texttt{stereo.default} example file distributed in the
+\texttt{examples/} directory of \ac{ASP} has everything you need to process this
stereo pair. The actual file has a lot of comments to show you what
options and values are possible. Here's a trimmed version of the
important values in that file.
@@ -441,12 +435,14 @@ \subsection{Diagnosing Problems}
> disparitydebug results/output-F.tif
\end{verbatim}
-If the output H and V files from \texttt{disparitydebug} look okay,
+If the output H and V files from \texttt{disparitydebug} look good,
then the point cloud image is most likely ready for post-processing.
You can proceed to make a mesh or a \ac{DEM} by processing
\texttt{results/output-PC.tif} using the \texttt{point2mesh} or
\texttt{point2dem} tools, respectively.
+Figure \ref {p19-disparity} shows the outputs of \texttt{disparitydebug}.
+
\begin{figure}[b!]
\begin{minipage}{4in}
\includegraphics[width=4in]{images/p19-disparity.png}
@@ -496,14 +492,16 @@ \subsection{Building a 3D Model}
normalized image as inputs:
\begin{verbatim}
- > point2mesh results/output-PC.tif results/output-L.tif -l
+ > point2mesh results/output-PC.tif results/output-L.tif -l
+ > osgviewer results/output.ive
\end{verbatim}
-\noindent
+The image displayed by \texttt{osgviewer} is shown in figure \ref{p19-osg}.
+
When the \texttt{osgviewer} program starts, you may want to toggle the
lighting with the `L' key, toggle texturing with the 'T' key, and
toggle wireframe mode with the 'W'. Press '?' to see a variety of
-other interactive options.
+other interactive options.
\begin{figure}[h!]
\begin{minipage}{5in}
@@ -554,6 +552,8 @@ \subsection{Building a Digital Elevation Model}
results/output-PC.tif
\end{verbatim}
+See figure \ref{p19-norm_ortho} on the right for the output of this command.
+
\noindent
The \texttt{point2dem} program is also able to accept output
projection options the same way as the tools in GDAL. Well known EPSG,
@@ -644,17 +644,19 @@ \subsection{Alignment to point clouds from a different source}
the maximum displacement we expect to see as result of alignment, that
is, by how much the points will move when the alignment transform is
applied. If not known, a large (but not unreasonably so) number can be
-specified. It is used to remove most of the points in one of the cloud
-which have no chance of having a corresponding point in the other
-cloud.
+specified. It is used to remove most of the points in the source
+(moveable) point cloud which have no chance of having a corresponding
+point in the reference (fixed) point cloud.
+
+Here is how \texttt{pc\_align} can be called.
\begin {verbatim}
> pc_align --max-displacement 200 --datum D_MARS \
--save-inv-transformed-reference-points \
results/output-PC.tif mola.csv
\end{verbatim}
-The complete documentation for \texttt{pc\_align} is in section
+The complete documentation for this program is in section
\ref{pcalign}.
\subsection{Creating DEMs relative to the Geoid/Areoid}
@@ -709,6 +711,8 @@ \subsection{Generating Color Hillshade Maps}
> colormap results/output-DEM.tif -s hrad-shaded.tif -o hrad-color-shaded.tif
\end{verbatim}
+See figure \ref{hrad-color} showing the images obtained with these commands.
+
\begin{figure}[b!]
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=4.7in]{images/p19-colorized-shaded.png}
@@ -745,6 +749,8 @@ \subsection{Building Overlays for Moon and Mars mode in Google Earth}
> image2qtree hrad-shaded-colorized.tif -m kml --draw-order 100
\end{verbatim}
+Figure \ref{hrad-kml} shows the obtained KML files in Google Earth.
+
\begin{figure}[b!]
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=6in]{images/p19-googlemars.png}
@@ -847,6 +853,14 @@ \section{Processing Raw}
\label{fig:dg-nomap-example}
\end{figure}
+It is important to note that we could have performed stereo using the
+approximate RPC model instead of the exact linear camera model (both
+models are in the same XML file), by switching the session in the
+\texttt{stereo} command above from \texttt{-t dg} to \texttt{-t
+rpc}. The RPC model is somewhat less accurate, so the results will not
+be the same, in our experiments we've seen differences in the 3D
+terrains using the two approaches of 5 meters or more.
+
\subsubsection*{stereo.default}
The stereo.default example file (appendix \ref{ch:stereodefault}) works
@@ -997,11 +1011,11 @@ \section{Dealing with Terrain Lacking Large Scale Features}
of the input images (section \ref{d-sub}).
This approach usually works quite well for rocky terrain, but may fail
-for snowy landscapes, which can have only small-scale grooves or ridges
-sculpted by wind (so-called {\it zastrugi}) that disappear at low
-resolution.
+for snowy landscapes, whose only features may be small-scale
+grooves or ridges sculpted by wind (so-called {\it zastrugi}) that
+disappear at low resolution.
-Stereo Pipeline deals with such terrains by using a tool named
+Stereo Pipeline handles such terrains by using a tool named
\texttt{sparse\_disp} to create
\texttt{\textit{output\_prefix}-D\_sub.tif} at full resolution, yet only
at a sparse set of pixels, for reasons of speed. This

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