Allows you to execute scripts describing OSC messages to automate interaction with an OSC server.
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README.md

osc-scripter

This is a command-line app that sends a series of OSC (Open Sound Control) messages to a target OSC server. The program reads a script file that contains some basic configuration info followed by a series of commands.

Commands can take different forms. The can be raw OSC messages, or they can be instructions to invoke a method that in turn constructs a sequence of OSC messages.

Such complex commands can also be set to run in an endless loop, so you can kick of some repeating behavior while continuing to send other messages.

Learn more about OSC here

The code is still kind of raw, with some experimentation going on. But it works, and it's quite slick.

The program reads in a script file, parses out some configuration details, and then executes the remaining lines as script commands.

The program, while running, also listens for OSC messages. It assumes that any message it receives is a raw string formatted as a script command. These messages are executed as soon as they are received.

Script commands include the ability to execute methods defined in osc-scripter. One of those methods, load_file loads an external file that (presumably) contains Ruby code defining more command handlers.

You can also load custom code when you start osc-scripter by passing in the path to a source file.

Features

  • Send "raw" OSC messages
  • Set timed delays between messages
  • Send meta commands that in turn create sequences of OSC messages
  • Run a sequence of messages in a named loop
  • Send commands to stop a named message loops
  • Accept OSC commands containing script commands to invoke
  • Dynamically load files (e.g, additional command handlers) from script commands
  • Have your entire script run in a loop

Examples

Please see https://github.com/JustTheBestParts/OSC-Demos.

Script syntax

Scripts are plain text. You can use any file extension you like, since the code reads the file name given. However, the example files use the .oscr extension.

This is a sample script:

127.0.0.1:8000
8001
0.5
/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/alpha 1.0
/animata/sprite/orientation/left
:@interpolate1[alpha_loop]||/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/alpha||1.0||0.0||5
/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/move   500.0 30.0
10
/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/alpha 1.0
5
:stoploop[alpha_loop]
30
/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/alpha 1.0
3

The first line of every script must have the IP address and port of the OSC server, separated by a ':'.

The second line of every script must have the port for the internal OSC server

All remaining lines are script commands. Assorted character delimiters and pattern matching is used to indicate special command processing.

If a command start with a digit it is assumed to represent seconds; the program will go into a sleep loop for that length of time. Durinf that time the program stops fetching and executing commands in the script. However, if you have initiated any threaded loops they will continue running.

If a command starts with a ':' it is assumed that this is a "complex" command. That's perhaps not the best terminology but it's what I've been using in order to have some way to think and write about it. Complex commands have this syntax:

:<method_name>||<osc/address/pattern>||<arg1>||<arg2>|| ...

So, theoretically, you can just add whatever methods you like to the code (for example, by loading your own custom command handler file) and have them called via script commands.

The application code at the moment as two methods specifically meant for this, interpolate1 and interpolate2.

interpolate1 takes an address pattern that uses a single argument (presumably a float, for this code). It also takes two range values, a start and end value for this address pattern. There's rhen one last argument, a float indication a duration.

Here's an example:

    :@interpolate1[alpha_loop]||/animata/sprite_left/layer/main_head/alpha||1.0||0.0||5

There's a constant, TIME_FRACTION, used for timing short delays in loops. The method figures out how many such intervals make up the given duration, and constructs that many interpolated values, from the start value to the end value. Basically, a series of evenly-spaced steps to be carried out over the length of the given duration. Handy, for example, to fade out an animation sprite in a specific length of time.

There's a bug here, though: The timing is not terribly precise. It's close, but don't set your watch to it.

interpolate2 is similar, but interpolates using two distinct variables.

Both of these run the created sequence in a thread, so once initiated the script processing continues. This allows you to have multiple things running at the same time.

If a command starts with ':@' it indicates a complex command that should be run in an endless (threaded) loop.

:@<method_name>||<arg1>||<arg2>|| ...

Such commands can also include a loop "label", using brackets, like this

:@<method_name>[<label_name>]||<arg1>||<arg2>|| ...

If a label is provided then the loop thread is stashed in a hash with the label as the key.

This allows for another special command:

:stoploop[<label_name>]

This tells the program to go look up the thread reference keyed with that label and kill it.

(BTW, it may now occur to you now that there are at least two ways to stop a loop.)

By default, osc-scripter will work its way through the script, executing commands in order, until it reaches the last command. It will then exit. You can alter this behavior with yet another special command, :loop_on

As you may have guessed, loop_on is just a built-in method. It toggles a flag that controls whether script commands, after execution, should be pushed back onto the end end of the list of commands so that they will be re-executed as the program works its way through the script.

You can include comments in your script by starting a line with '#'. If global looping is turned on then comment lines are also pished back on to the end of the command list. You can, for example, end your script with this:

:loop_on
# This will keep the program alive forever

This allows you to keep your instance of osc-scripter running in an endless "no-op" loop. While looping osc-scripter is still accepting OSC messages on it's own OSC server, so you could use some other tool, such as osc-repl or TouchOSC to drive osc-scripter, which in turn would drive some other OSC server.

There's no built-in quit command. However, since any Ruby method available to the program is available by sending a :<method> command you can simply send :exit to the internal OSC server.

Internal OSC server

There's is an OSC server that runs inside the program. It matches on (so far) two address patterns: /add and /eval.

In both cases the message arguments are assumed to be script commands.

If you send an /add message then the argument is appended to the end of the current running script.

If you send an /eval message then the argument is executed immediately.

This is helpful for live performances where the somewhat loose timing of a script can be compensated with immediate commands sent from some other source (TouchOSC, for example, or Control).

It also means that you can run scripts against applications that can, in turn, send back OSC messages, such as Renoise.

For some existential fun you can have two instances of osc-scripter interact with each other.

If for some reason you do not want an internal OSC server then set that port to 0.

Loading custom command handlers

When running osc-scripter you can pass, in addition to the name of the script file, the path to some source code file. This file will be loaded (i.e. load is called on the file path) at the start of the program.

Since that is done using a built-in method named (surprise) load_file you can also load files from our script or by OSC (by sending a script command to load a file).

Note that file ocation is assumed to be relative from the directory in which you started osc-scripter.

If you want to be really clever you could load a file that defines a method that calls eval and dynamically add code using OSC.

Proof is left as an exercise for the reader.

Requirements

Ruby, the osc-ruby gem, and a sense of adventure.

Install

Grab the source from github.com. A gem will at some point be up at gems.neurogami.com

Usage

$ osc-scripter <path-to-script-file> [optional-path-to-additional-code-file]

Author

James Britt / Neurogami (james@neurogami.com)

License

The MIT License

Copyright (c) 2013 James Britt / Neurogami

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the 'Software'), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS', WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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