Update Installing in RHEL docs #137

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atodorov commented Jan 30, 2017

@tkdchen

  • updated for RHEL 7
  • the preferred way to install is using virtualenv
  • simplified WSGI config but kept reference to previous example
  • split Upgrading and Configuration in separate sections b/c I
    intend to write more info for that

Note: the biggest change is installing with virtualenv and not directly into the system path. I believe virtualenv is the preferred way to host Django (and Python) applications. At least sites like DigitalOcean recommend it. It provides benefits and doesn't really add a lot of overhead when creating the environment so IMO this is an acceptable change.

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virtualenv is not a recommended way to install Nitrate in a server running RHEL or Fedora. If the virtualenv way is needed for some cases, like DigitalOcean, create a separate document for it, maybe the subject is Deploy a server using virtualenv. Then, users have documents for different deployment requirements by either package (currently the RPM) or virtualenv.

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tkdchen commented Jan 31, 2017

virtualenv is not a recommended way to install Nitrate in a server running RHEL or Fedora. If the virtualenv way is needed for some cases, like DigitalOcean, create a separate document for it, maybe the subject is Deploy a server using virtualenv. Then, users have documents for different deployment requirements by either package (currently the RPM) or virtualenv.

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OK fair enough, I will split this into a separate document for installing with virtualenv and RHEL. However IMO the current state of RPM packages for Nitrate and its dependencies is very bad. I'm not even sure all of the dependencies in their correct versions are available in RHEL and Fedora.

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atodorov commented Jan 31, 2017

OK fair enough, I will split this into a separate document for installing with virtualenv and RHEL. However IMO the current state of RPM packages for Nitrate and its dependencies is very bad. I'm not even sure all of the dependencies in their correct versions are available in RHEL and Fedora.

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I will split this into a separate document for installing with virtualenv and RHEL

I meant a separate general document for deployment with virtualenv in a server, whichever Linux distribution the server is running. This guide could be used to install Nitrate on Fedora, CentOS, RHEL, and even Debian. But, not only for RHEL.

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tkdchen commented Jan 31, 2017

I will split this into a separate document for installing with virtualenv and RHEL

I meant a separate general document for deployment with virtualenv in a server, whichever Linux distribution the server is running. This guide could be used to install Nitrate on Fedora, CentOS, RHEL, and even Debian. But, not only for RHEL.

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Updated the docs.

wrt: I meant a separate general document for deployment with virtualenv in a server, whichever Linux distribution the server is running I strongly advise against that. In my experience these kinds of general documents get outdated fairly quickly due to quirks and differences between the various distributions. Also I don't really have an Ubuntu or Debian system to verify the steps will work on them. That's why I've opted for a specific distro + deployment method approach.

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atodorov commented Jan 31, 2017

Updated the docs.

wrt: I meant a separate general document for deployment with virtualenv in a server, whichever Linux distribution the server is running I strongly advise against that. In my experience these kinds of general documents get outdated fairly quickly due to quirks and differences between the various distributions. Also I don't really have an Ubuntu or Debian system to verify the steps will work on them. That's why I've opted for a specific distro + deployment method approach.

docs/source/installing_in_virtualenv.rst
@@ -0,0 +1,165 @@
+Installing Nitrate on RHEL7 (virtualenv) with Apache and MySQL

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I prefer to remove "RHEL7" from this subject. Following content tells how to install in a virtualenv and the RHEL7 is just an example selected as the base OS. As you mentioned, these deployment steps could also apply to other distros.

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I prefer to remove "RHEL7" from this subject. Following content tells how to install in a virtualenv and the RHEL7 is just an example selected as the base OS. As you mentioned, these deployment steps could also apply to other distros.

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atodorov Feb 1, 2017

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In this case how do you feel about removing "RHEL6" from the installing_in_rhel.rst file ? It's true the deployment steps can be used for other distros but the reality is that all steps and file locations are specific to one particular distribution, used to create the document.

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atodorov Feb 1, 2017

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In this case how do you feel about removing "RHEL6" from the installing_in_rhel.rst file ? It's true the deployment steps can be used for other distros but the reality is that all steps and file locations are specific to one particular distribution, used to create the document.

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No. In RHEL, RPM is the only recommended way to install Nitrate. virtualenv is another choice to deloy Nitrate in whatever RHEL, CentOS, or Debian, but it's not recommended officially and I also don't want users to misunderstand from official documentation. Anyway, your proposed document is much useful as a guide of "Install Nitrate with virtualenv", obviously you could mention that you choose RHEL and the steps should also apply to other distros (that you have done in document).

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No. In RHEL, RPM is the only recommended way to install Nitrate. virtualenv is another choice to deloy Nitrate in whatever RHEL, CentOS, or Debian, but it's not recommended officially and I also don't want users to misunderstand from official documentation. Anyway, your proposed document is much useful as a guide of "Install Nitrate with virtualenv", obviously you could mention that you choose RHEL and the steps should also apply to other distros (that you have done in document).

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atodorov Feb 2, 2017

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Should be good to go now.

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atodorov Feb 2, 2017

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Should be good to go now.

+ STATIC_ROOT = '/var/www/html/mynitrate/static'
+
+
+``/var/www/html/mynitrate/wsgi.py``::

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tkdchen Jan 31, 2017

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Here, tcms/wsgi.py can be used instead?

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tkdchen Jan 31, 2017

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Here, tcms/wsgi.py can be used instead?

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atodorov Feb 1, 2017

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Nope, this instance of wsgi.py at the very least points to the customized settings.py file, which inherits from tcms.settings.product but allows settings to be overriden and extended.

Depending on the particular environment you may also load the virtualenv from inside wsgi.py and not from Apache. IMO the best practice is to let users have their own configuration depending on the particular instance and not tell them to modify the stock Nitrate settings.py file. This will only result in problems later down the road.

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atodorov Feb 1, 2017

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Nope, this instance of wsgi.py at the very least points to the customized settings.py file, which inherits from tcms.settings.product but allows settings to be overriden and extended.

Depending on the particular environment you may also load the virtualenv from inside wsgi.py and not from Apache. IMO the best practice is to let users have their own configuration depending on the particular instance and not tell them to modify the stock Nitrate settings.py file. This will only result in problems later down the road.

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tkdchen Feb 1, 2017

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Okay, make sense.

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tkdchen Feb 1, 2017

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Okay, make sense.

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atodorov Feb 6, 2017

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ping, is this good to go ?

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atodorov commented Feb 6, 2017

ping, is this good to go ?

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LGTM. Could you please sign-off and rebase this patch? After that, I'll merge it.

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tkdchen commented Feb 6, 2017

LGTM. Could you please sign-off and rebase this patch? After that, I'll merge it.

Add documentation about installation with Apache and virtualenv
Signed-off-by: Mr. Senko <atodorov@mrsenko.com>
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ready to go

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atodorov commented Feb 6, 2017

ready to go

@tkdchen tkdchen merged commit 82625f1 into Nitrate:develop Feb 6, 2017

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