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[ARCHIVED] This sample shows how to build a multitenant MVC web application that uses Azure AD for sign-in using the OpenID Connect protocol, and then calls a Office 365 API under the signed-in user's identity using tokens obtained via OAuth 2.0. This sample uses the OpenID Connect ASP.Net OWIN middleware and ADAL .Net.
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README.md

[ARCHIVED] Office 365 APIs MultiTenant Web Application

Note: This repo is archived and no longer actively maintained. Security vulnerabilities may exist in the project, or its dependencies. If you plan to reuse or run any code from this repo, be sure to perform appropriate security checks on the code or dependencies first. Do not use this project as the starting point of a production Office Add-in. Always start your production code by using the Office/SharePoint development workload in Visual Studio, or the Yeoman generator for Office Add-ins, and follow security best practices as you develop the add-in.

This sample shows how to build an MVC web application that uses Azure AD for sign-in using the OpenID Connect protocol, and then calls a Office 365 API under the signed-in user's identity using tokens obtained via OAuth 2.0. This sample uses the OpenID Connect ASP.Net OWIN middleware and ADAL .Net.

Update 12/16/2014 The sample now uses a persistent ADAL token cache that uses a database for its token cache. You can see the token cache implementation in the following files:

How to Run this Sample

To run this sample, you need:

  1. Visual Studio 2013
  2. Office 365 API Tools for Visual Studio 2013
  3. Office 365 Developer Subscription

Step 1: Clone or download this repository

From your Git Shell or command line:

git clone https://github.com/OfficeDev/O365-WebApp-MultiTenant.git

Step 2: Build the Project

  1. Open the project in Visual Studio 2013.
  2. Simply Build the project to restore NuGet packages.
  3. Ignore any build errors for now as we will configure the project in the next steps.

Step 3: Configure the sample

Once downloaded, open the sample in Visual Studio.

Register Azure AD application to consume Office 365 APIs

Office 365 applications use Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) to authenticate and authorize users and applications respectively. All users, application registrations, permissions are stored in Azure AD.

Using the Office 365 API Tool for Visual Studio you can configure your web application to consume Office 365 APIs.

  1. In the Solution Explorer window, right click your project -> Add -> Connected Service.
  2. A Services Manager dialog box will appear. Choose Office 365 -> Office 365 API and click Register your app.
  3. On the sign-in dialog box, enter the username and password for your Office 365 tenant.
  4. After you're signed in, you will see a list of all the services.
  5. Initially, no permissions will be selected, as the app is not registered to consume any services yet.
  6. Select Users and Groups and then click Permissions
  7. In the Users and Groups Permissions dialog, select Enable sign-on and read users profiles' and click Apply
  8. Select Contacts and then click Permissions
  9. In the Contacts Permissions dialog, select Read users' contacts and click Apply
  10. Click on App Properties and select Multiple Organizations to make this app multi-tenant.
  11. Click Ok

After clicking OK in the Services Manager dialog box, Office 365 client libraries (in the form of NuGet packages) for connecting to Office 365 APIs will be added to your project.

In this process, Office 365 API tool registered an Azure AD Application in the Office 365 tenant that you signed in the wizard and added the Azure AD application details to web.config.

Step 4: Build and Debug your web application

Now you are ready for a test run. Hit F5 to test the app.

Quick Look at the SSO Authentication Code

The authentication startup class, App_Start/Startup.Auth.cs in the project contains the startup logic for Azure AD authentication.

The sample uses a persistent ADAL token cache that uses a database for its token cache. You can see the token cache implementation in the following files:

Sign In and Sign Out Controls

The sign in and sign out controls are already added to the views. You can find them under Views\Shared folder.

  1. _LoginPartial.cshtml is the partial view that renders the Sign In and Sign Out actions.
  2. _LoginPartial.cshtml is then rendered in _Layout.cshtml
  3. The AccountController.cs has the required methods for sign in and sign out.

Requiring authentication to access controllers

Applying Authorize attribute to all controllers in your project will require the user to be authenticated before accessing these controllers. To allow the controller to be accessed anonymously, remove this attribute from the controller. If you want to set the permissions at a more granular level, apply the attribute to each method that requires authorization instead of applying it to the controller class.

Write Code to call Office 365 APIs

You can now write code to call an Office 365 API in your web application. You can apply the Autorize attribute to the desired controller or the method in which you wish to call Office 365 API.

ContactsController.cs describes how to interact with the Office 365 API discovery service, get the endpoint URI and resource Id for Outlook Services and then query users' contacts.

This project has adopted the Microsoft Open Source Code of Conduct. For more information, see the Code of Conduct FAQ or contact opencode@microsoft.com with any additional questions or comments.

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