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Background Questions about "The Alkyl's" #455

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sdilones opened this Issue Oct 27, 2016 · 2 comments

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@sdilones

sdilones commented Oct 27, 2016

Me and @anna-schrecengost are currently looking into the history of the alkyl (specifically with an internal alkyne) and just had a couple of clarifying questions:

alkyne

  1. What exactly makes the side chain a potential metabolic hotspot?
  2. Why does adding more than three atoms cause it to lose potency?
  3. Why exactly did replacing the the triazole aryl substituent with a cyclo(hetero)aliphatic group lower the potency?
  4. The internal alkyne,can only occur because of the benzylic oxidation, and without any substituents on the benzene, the alkyne can't occur, right?

@sdilones sdilones changed the title from Background Questions about to Background Questions about the Alkyl Oct 27, 2016

@sdilones sdilones changed the title from Background Questions about the Alkyl to Background Questions about the Alkyne Oct 27, 2016

@sdilones sdilones changed the title from Background Questions about the Alkyne to Background Questions about "the Alkyls" Oct 28, 2016

@sdilones sdilones changed the title from Background Questions about "the Alkyls" to Background Questions about "The Alkyl's" Oct 28, 2016

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mattodd Oct 31, 2016

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Hi - you saw #457 , right? The compound you show is not an "alkyl" - it contains an alkyne functional group. I think we need to be careful with terms to avoid confusion. Brief answers to questions:

  1. Normally benzylic positions can be hotspots - easier to oxidise. But it depends. I don't know about alkynes as hotspots, but really the alkyne is intended as a useful synthetic precursor to other analogs downstream.
  2. No idea. It'd be nice to know. We don't have the biological target, see #421
  3. Don't understand - can you provide MMV or OSM compound numbers or links to relevant structures so that we can see which structures you mean?
  4. Ahm, I don't understand your sentence, sorry.
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mattodd commented Oct 31, 2016

Hi - you saw #457 , right? The compound you show is not an "alkyl" - it contains an alkyne functional group. I think we need to be careful with terms to avoid confusion. Brief answers to questions:

  1. Normally benzylic positions can be hotspots - easier to oxidise. But it depends. I don't know about alkynes as hotspots, but really the alkyne is intended as a useful synthetic precursor to other analogs downstream.
  2. No idea. It'd be nice to know. We don't have the biological target, see #421
  3. Don't understand - can you provide MMV or OSM compound numbers or links to relevant structures so that we can see which structures you mean?
  4. Ahm, I don't understand your sentence, sorry.
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mattodd Nov 15, 2016

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As per #423 closing this now. Added this issue to DCNYS section of wiki.

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mattodd commented Nov 15, 2016

As per #423 closing this now. Added this issue to DCNYS section of wiki.

@mattodd mattodd closed this Nov 15, 2016

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