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How to install PBS Pro using the configure script.
1. Install the prerequisite packages for building PBS Pro.
For CentOS systems you should run the following command as root:
yum install -y gcc make rpm-build libtool hwloc-devel \
libX11-devel libXt-devel libedit-devel libical-devel \
ncurses-devel perl postgresql-devel python-devel tcl-devel \
tk-devel swig expat-devel openssl-devel libXext libXft \
autoconf automake
For openSUSE systems you should run the following command as root:
zypper install gcc make rpm-build libtool hwloc-devel \
libX11-devel libXt-devel libedit-devel libical-devel \
ncurses-devel perl postgresql-devel python-devel tcl-devel \
tk-devel swig libexpat-devel libopenssl-devel libXext-devel \
libXft-devel fontconfig autoconf automake
For Debian systems you should run the following command as root:
sudo apt-get install gcc make libtool libhwloc-dev libx11-dev \
libxt-dev libedit-dev libical-dev ncurses-dev perl \
postgresql-server-dev-all python-dev tcl-dev tk-dev swig \
libexpat-dev libssl-dev libxext-dev libxft-dev autoconf \
automake
2. Install the prerequisite packages for running PBS Pro. In addition
to the commands below, you should also install a text editor of
your choosing (vim, emacs, gedit, etc.).
For CentOS systems you should run the following command as root:
yum install -y expat libedit postgresql-server python \
sendmail sudo tcl tk libical
For openSUSE systems you should run the following command as root:
zypper install expat libedit postgresql-server python \
sendmail sudo tcl tk libical1
For Debian systems you should run the following command as root:
apt-get install expat libedit2 postgresql python sendmail-bin \
sudo tcl tk libical1a
3. Open a terminal as a normal (non-root) user, unpack the PBS Pro
tarball, and cd to the package directory.
tar -xpvf pbspro-18.1.0.tar.gz
cd pbspro-18.1.0
4. Generate the configure script and Makefiles. (See note 1 below)
./autogen.sh
5. Display the available build parameters.
./configure --help
6. Configure the build for your environment. You may utilize the
parameters displayed in the previous step. (See note 2 below)
For CentOS and Debian systems you should run the following
command:
./configure --prefix=/opt/pbs
For openSUSE systems (see note 3 below) you should run the
following command:
./configure --prefix=/opt/pbs --libexecdir=/opt/pbs/libexec
7. Build PBS Pro by running "make". (See note 4 below)
make
8. Configure sudo to allow your user account to run commands as
root. Refer to the online manual pages for sudo, sudoers, and
visudo.
9. Install PBS Pro. Use sudo to run the command as root.
sudo make install
10. Configure PBS Pro by executing the post-install script.
sudo /opt/pbs/libexec/pbs_postinstall
11. Edit /etc/pbs.conf to configure the PBS Pro services that
should be started. If you are installing PBS Pro on only
one system, you should change the value of PBS_START_MOM
from zero to one. If you use vi as your editor, you would
run:
sudo vi /etc/pbs.conf
12. Some file permissions must be modified to add SUID privilege.
sudo chmod 4755 /opt/pbs/sbin/pbs_iff /opt/pbs/sbin/pbs_rcp
13. Start the PBS Pro services.
sudo /etc/init.d/pbs start
14. All configured PBS services should now be running. Update
your PATH and MANPATH variables by sourcing the appropriate
PBS Pro profile or logging out and back in.
For Bourne shell (or similar) run the following:
. /etc/profile.d/pbs.sh
For C shell (or similar) run the following:
source /etc/profile.d/pbs.csh
15. You should now be able to run PBS Pro commands to submit
and query jobs. Some examples follow.
bash$ qstat -B
Server Max Tot Que Run Hld Wat Trn Ext Status
---------------- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----------
host1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Active
bash$ pbsnodes -a
host1
Mom = host1
ntype = PBS
state = free
pcpus = 2
resources_available.arch = linux
resources_available.host = host1
resources_available.mem = 2049248kb
resources_available.ncpus = 2
resources_available.vnode = host1
resources_assigned.accelerator_memory = 0kb
resources_assigned.mem = 0kb
resources_assigned.naccelerators = 0
resources_assigned.ncpus = 0
resources_assigned.vmem = 0kb
resv_enable = True
sharing = default_shared
license = l
bash$ echo "sleep 60" | qsub
0.host1
bash$ qstat -a
host1:
Req'd Req'd Elap
Job ID Username Queue Jobname SessID NDS TSK Memory Time S Time
--------------- -------- -------- ---------- ------ --- --- ------ ----- - -----
0.host1 mike workq STDIN 2122 1 1 -- -- R 00:00
bash$
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NOTES:
Note 1: If you modify configure.ac or adjust timestamps on any files
that are automatically generated, you will need to regenerate them
by re-running autogen.sh.
Note 2: It is advisable to create a simple shell script that calls
configure with the appropriate options for your environment. This
ensures configure will be called with the same arguments during
subsequent invocations. If you have already run configure you can
regenerate all of the Makefiles by running "./config.status".
The first few lines of config.status will reveal the options that
were specified when configure was run. If you set envirnment
variables such as CFLAGS it is best to do so as an argument to
configure (e.g. ./configure CFLAGS="-O0 -g" --prefix=/opt/pbs).
This will ensure consistency when config.status regenerates the
Makefiles.
Note 3: The openSUSE rpm package expands %_libexecdir to /opt/pbs/lib
rather than /opt/pbs/libexec which causes problems for the post-
install scripts. Providing the --libexecdir value to configure
overrides this behavior.
Note 4: You need to use a POSIX (or nearly POSIX) make. GNU make
works quite well in this regard; BSD make does not. If you are
having any sort of build problems, your make should be a prime
suspect. Tremendous effort has been expended to provide proper
dependency generation and makefiles without relying on any
non-POSIX features. The build should work fine with a simple call
to make, however, complicating things by using various make flags
is not guaranteed to work. Don't be surprised if the first thing
that make does is call configure again.
Using valgrind with PBS Professional.
-------------------------------------
Here is a set of steps to detect memory errors/leaks within PBS code.
1. Install the valgrind development package.
yum install valgrind-devel (zypper for OpenSUSE).
2. Compile Python in a way that valgrind can work with it, as follows:
./configure --prefix=<installdir> --without-pymalloc --with-pydebug --with-valgrind
make; make install
3. Compile PBS Professional with the special python and in debug mode as follows:
./configure --prefix=<installdir> --with-python=<python-dir> CFLAGS="-g -DPy_DEBUG -DDEBUG -Wall -Werror"
4. Run pbs daemons under valgrind.
a) To detect memory errors (not leaks) run pbs daemons as follows:
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/pbs/pgsql/lib:/opt/pbs/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH
valgrind --tool=memcheck --log-file=/tmp/val.out /opt/pbs/sbin/pbs_server.bin
b) To detect memory leaks use the supplied leaks suppression file valgrind.supp, as follows:
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/pbs/pgsql/lib:/opt/pbs/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH
valgrind --tool=memcheck --log-file=/tmp/val.out --suppressions=./valgrind.supp --leak-check=full --track-origins=yes /opt/pbs/sbin/pbs_server.bin