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README.md

Published on NPM Build status Published on webcomponents.org

##<test-fixture>

The <test-fixture> element can simplify the exercise of consistently resetting a test suite's DOM.

See: Documentation.

To use it, wrap the test suite's DOM as a template:

<test-fixture id="SomeElementFixture">
  <template>
    <some-element id="SomeElementForTesting"></some-element>
  </template>
</test-fixture>

Now, the <test-fixture> element can be used to generate a copy of its template:

<script>
  describe('<some-element>', function () {
    var someElement;

    beforeEach(function () {
      document.getElementById('SomeElementFixture').create();
      someElement = document.getElementById('SomeElementForTesting');
    });
  });
</script>

Fixtured elements can be cleaned up by calling restore on the <test-fixture>:

  afterEach(function () {
    document.getElementById('SomeElementFixture').restore();
    // <some-element id='SomeElementForTesting'> has been removed
  });

<test-fixture> will create fixtures from all of its immediate <template> children. The DOM structure of fixture templates can be as simple or as complex as the situation calls for.

Even simpler usage in Mocha

In Mocha, usage can be simplified even further. Include test-fixture-mocha.js after Mocha in the <head> of your document and then fixture elements like so:

<script>
  describe('<some-element>', function () {
    var someElement;

    beforeEach(function () {
      someElement = fixture('SomeElementFixture');
    });
  });
</script>

Fixtured elements will be automatically restored in the afterEach phase of the current Mocha Suite.

Data-bound templates

Data-binding systems are also supported, as long as your (custom) template elements define a stamp(model) method that returns a document fragment. This allows you to stamp out templates w/ custom models for your fixtures.

For example, using Polymer's dom-bind:

<test-fixture id="bound">
  <dom-bind>
    <template>
      <span>{{greeting}}</span>
    </template>
  </dom-bind>
</test-fixture>

You can pass an optional context argument to create() or fixture() to pass the model:

var bound = fixture('bound', {greeting: 'ohai thurr'});

The problem being addressed

Consider the following web-component-tester test suite:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
  <title>some-element test suite</title>
</head>
<body>
  <some-element id="SomeElementForTesting"></some-element>
  <script type="module">
    import '../some-element.js';
    describe('<some-element>', function () {
      var someElement;

      beforeEach(function () {
        someElement = document.getElementById('SomeElementForTesting');
      });

      it('can receive property `foo`', function () {
        someElement.foo = 'bar';
        expect(someElement.foo).to.be.equal('bar');
      });

      it('has a default `foo` value of `undefined`', function () {
        expect(someElement.foo).to.be.equal(undefined);
      });
    });
  </script>
</body>
</html>

In this contrived example, the suite will pass or fail depending on which order the tests are run in. It is non-deterministic because someElement has internal state that is not properly reset at the end of each test.

It would be trivial in the above example to simply reset someElement.foo to the expected default value of undefined in an afterEach hook. However, for non-contrived test suites that target complex elements, this can result in a large quantity of ever-growing set-up and tear-down boilerplate.