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This repo has data and code for the May 4 (online) and May 5, 2019 (print) St. Louis Post-Dispatch story "With fewer park employees than there are parks in St. Louis, corners get cut".
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README.md

With fewer park employees than there are parks in St. Louis, corners get cut

What is this?

This repo contains data and code used for the May 4 (online) and May 5, 2019 (print) St. Louis Post-Dispatch story "With fewer park employees than there are parks in St. Louis, corners get cut". The story was reported by Jesse Bogan with data analysis done by Janelle O'Dea.

Assumptions

The following things are assumed to be true in this documentation.

  • You are running OSX.
  • You are using Python 2.7. (Probably the version that came OSX.)
  • You have virtualenv and virtualenvwrapper installed and working.

How to reproduce

To reproduce this data analysis, you'll need a working knowledge of virtual environments and Python.

You'll need the libraries as specified in the requirements.txt file. To install the libraries, change into the parks directory, turn on your virtual environment and run the Terminal command pip install -r requirements.txt.

Extract the data from the .zip file.

The code in the Jupyter Notebook file shows the filtering and sorting that was done to get the data points reported in the story. To see how we arrived at the data, run the code in the Jupyter Notebook file parks.ipynb.

Data caveats

The Archive.zip file contains the data used for this analysis, as downloaded on April 30, 2019 from the city of St. Louis Open Data portal https://www.stlouis-mo.gov/data/service-requests.cfm#CP_JUMP_632762 under the "Service Requests" link.

The data reflect complaints submitted by residents of the city of St. Louis by phone, web, email or Twitter. Each row reflects one complaint.

The data dictionary can be found at the same Open Data portal link above, under the "Service Request Field Definitions" link.

The complaint data reflects only what's reported to the city. Other issues at parks may exist and nobody calls them in.

There is a unique identifier for each complaint, REQUESTID. There is not a unique identifier for who reported the complaint. Therefore, it's not possible to know if the same person made all of the complaints about a particular park or a number of different people did.

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