Learning Analytics dashboard for Twitter-facilitated teaching
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README.md

Learning Analytics Dashboard

What the project does

This is an information dashboard that analyzes tweets produced under a specific course hashtag, and displays the resulting visualizations. The goal is to allow instructors to see their students' Twitter activity, visually in real-time.

Why is it useful

As social media take root in our society, more and more University instructors are incorporating platforms like Twitter into their classroom. However, very few of the current Learning Analytics (LA) systems and dashboards are able to process and visualize social media data for the purpose of instructional interventions and evaluation.

As a result, instructors who are using social media in the classroom have no easy way to assess their students learning progress or to use the data to adjust and improve their lessons in real time.

This software allows instructors to explore how their students create, share, and engage with materials on Twitter as part of their learning activites.

How to get started

Installation: here

Usage: here

Where to get help

Anatoliy Gruzd
Director – Social Media Lab
Ted Rogers School of Management
gruzd@ryerson.ca

Nadia Conroy
Postdoc Researcher – Social Media Lab
Ted Rogers School of Management
n1conroy@ryerson.ca

Who maintains and contributes to the project

This software is maintained and updated by members of the Social Media Lab, Ted Rogers School of Management. Ryerson University.

*This software is distrubuted under GNU General Public License v3.0 GNU (GPLv3)

*This work was supported in part by eCampusOntario (https://www.ecampusontario.ca/) and The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/).