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fix typo in <em> html tags

(they're styled out anyway, but that may change)
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1 parent 62c2706 commit 7327047e7b8960b1ecce115eee05a9e260d00be3 @nusco nusco committed Nov 24, 2012
Showing with 5 additions and 5 deletions.
  1. +3 −3 resources/public/tutorial/page10.html
  2. +1 −1 resources/public/tutorial/page3.html
  3. +1 −1 src/tryclojure/views/home.clj
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6 resources/public/tutorial/page10.html
@@ -17,19 +17,19 @@
Vectors and lists are sequential and ordered collections.
Sets are not ordered, and they cannot contain duplicate elements.
Maps are key-value collections, where the keys can be any object.
- Here, we've used what Clojure calls a <emp>keyword</emp> (<code>:foo</code>) for one of the keys, and a number for the other key.
+ Here, we've used what Clojure calls a <em>keyword</em> (<code>:foo</code>) for one of the keys, and a number for the other key.
</p>
<p>
- Now I'll tell you another thing that may surprise you: Clojure collections are <emp>immutable</emp> - they can never change.
+ Now I'll tell you another thing that may surprise you: Clojure collections are <em>immutable</em> - they can never change.
When you do anything on a list, including adding and removing elements, you actually get a brand new list.
(Fortunately, Clojure is amazingly efficient at creating new lists).
In general, Clojure encourages you to have as little mutable state as possible.
For example, instead of "for" loops and other state-changing constructs, most of the time you'll see functions doing transformations on immutable data and returning new collections, without changing the old one.
</p>
<p>
- A prime example of this is <code>map</code>. <code>map</code> is a <emp>higher order function</emp>, which means that it takes another function as an argument.
+ A prime example of this is <code>map</code>. <code>map</code> is a <em>higher order function</em>, which means that it takes another function as an argument.
For example, you can ask <code>map</code> to increment each number in a vector by passing it the <code>inc</code> function, followed by the vector.
Try it for yourself: type <code class="expr">(map inc [1 2 3 4])</code> to continue.
</p>
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2 resources/public/tutorial/page3.html
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
</p>
<p>
- A Clojure program is made of <emp>lists</emp>.
+ A Clojure program is made of <em>lists</em>.
<code class="expr">(+ 3 3)</code> is a list that contains an operator, and then the operands.
Try out the same concept with the <code>*</code> and <code>-</code> operators.
</p>
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2 src/tryclojure/views/home.clj
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
(defpartial home-html []
[:p.bottom
"Welcome to Clojure! "
- "You can see a Clojure interpreter above - we call it a <emp>REPL</emp>."
+ "You can see a Clojure interpreter above - we call it a <em>REPL</em>."
]
[:p.bottom
"Type \"tutorial\" in the REPL to begin."

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