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Contributing to BrainVerse

This document is adapted from NICEMAN's CONTRIBUTING.md. Thanks to NICEMAN team!

Development environment


Requirements

  • Node.js (which comes with npm) installed on your computer.

  • Git

This app is being developed and tested with NodeJS v8.9.1, npm 5.5.1 and git 2.11.0 on macOS Sierra version 10.12.6.

To Begin

# For quick start clone the main repository
git clone https://github.com/ReproNim/brainverse.git

# Go into the directory containing the repository
cd brainverse

# Install devDependencies and dependencies listed in the package.json - e.g. electron, bootstrap and jQuery
npm install

# App Configuration
# Go to eapp/config
cd eapp/config

# Get clientId and secretKey from GitHub (see below)
# Fill in app-config.js using your favorite editor
# Note you should not commit app-config.js as it contains clientId and secretKey
vim app-config.js

# Run the app in development mode
npm start

Get clientId and secretKey from GitHub by registering this App

To use BrainVerse as Web app

  • Type '127.0.0.1:3000/' in your browser
  • Login using your GitHub credentials
  • To access any html page in eapp/modules/module-name/html in your browser, type '127.0.0.1:3000/module-name/html/HTMLFileName.html'
  • The REST API for the app is in the eapp/routes directory

Building for multiple platforms

The BrainVerse application can be built for Linux and Windows within Docker. Build a macOS distributable on macOS, as code signing is not available for macOS within Docker. Run the following command in the root project directory to build BrainVerse for Linux and Windows.

docker run --rm \
  -v $(pwd):/project \
  electronuserland/builder:wine \
  bash -c "
    yarn --link-duplicates --pure-lockfile \
    && yarn dist --linux --win
  "

Files organization


  • eapp/ is the folder consisting of source code for the app and where major development is happening.
  • eapp/ is organized closely as an Express web framework application folder structure:
    • config/ - consists of the app configuration file
    • modules/ - consists of user interface (UI) of modules that are being actively developed.
      • Each module source code resides in a separate folder under modules/ so that independent and modularized development can happen.
      • Current modules that are being actively developed:
        • experiment-planner/
        • nda-editor/
        • instrument-editor
        • data-collection
        • term-search/
        • audit-trail/
      • Deprecated modules (will be removed):
        • project-planner/
        • nda/
      • Each module is further organized as:
        • html - all html files relevant to the module
        • js - all javascript files relevant to the module
        • css - all CSS relevant files to the module
    • public/ - consists of all files/assets/templates relevant to the app and common to the modules
    • routes/ - consists of REST API of the BrainVerse app spread over different javascript files for modularization
    • util/ - consists of utility files being used across different modules of the app
    • views/ - consists of the pug files that the app loads on startup
    • app.js - This file is first executed by the app to set up express sever
  • tests/ - consists of deprecated files. We will be updating them soon.
  • src/- deprecated. it will be removed
  • build/ - consists icons for the build
  • main.js - the entry point of the app
  • package.json - the file consisting of all dependencies and build information
  • package-lock.json - generated by npm version > 5. Needs to be committed in a separate commit.
  • yarn.lock - generated by yarn during the built process.
  • .travis.yml - configuration for TRAVIS CI

Git set up


The preferred way to contribute to the BrainVerse code base is to fork the main repository on GitHub.

Option 1

  1. Fork the project repository: click on the 'Fork' button near the top right of the page. This creates a copy of the code base under your account on the GitHub server.

  2. Clone the forked project repository as your remote origin in your local disk:

git clone https://github.com/YourLogin/brainverse.git
  1. Check your git remote:
git remote -v

Note that it should display:

origin	https://github.com/YourLogin/brainverse.git (fetch)
origin	https://github.com/YourLogin/brainverse.git (push)
  1. Add main project repository as another remote upstream:
git remote add upstream https://github.com/ReproNim/brainverse.git

Now

git remote -v

will display

origin	https://github.com/YourLogin/brainverse.git (fetch)
origin	https://github.com/YourLogin/brainverse.git (push)
upstream	https://github.com/ReproNim/brainverse.git (fetch)
upstream	https://github.com/ReproNim/brainverse.git (push)
  1. Create a branch (generally off the origin/master) to hold your changes:
git checkout -b feature-my-new-feature

and start making changes.

Ideally, use a prefix signaling the purpose of the branch:

  • feature- for new features
  • enh- for enhancements
  • bugfix- for bug fixes
  • refactor- for refactoring
  • doc- for documentation contributions

We recommend to not work in the master branch!

  1. Work on this copy on your computer using Git to do the version control. When you're done editing, do:

    git add modified_files
    git commit -m "your commit message"

    to record your changes in Git. Ideally, prefix your commit messages with the NF for new feature, ENH for enhancement, BF for bug fix, RF for refactor, DOC for documentation update, but you could also use TST for commits concerned solely with tests, and BK to signal that the commit causes a breakage (e.g. of tests) at that point. Multiple entries could be listed joined with a + (e.g. rf+doc-). See git log for examples. If a commit closes an existing BrainVerse issue, then add to the end of the message (Closes#ISSUE_NUMER).

  2. Push to GitHub with:

git push origin feature-my-new-feature

Finally, go to the web page of your fork of the Brainverse repo, and click 'Pull request' (PR) to send your changes to the maintainers for review. This will send an email to the committers. You can commit new changes to this branch and keep pushing to your remote -- github automatically adds them to your previously opened PR.

  1. To obtain changes from main project repository master branch and merge to current branch:
git pull upstream master

Option 2

  1. Have a clone of our main project repository as origin remote in your git:
git clone git://github.com/ReproNim/brainverse
  1. Fork the project repository: click on the 'Fork' button near the top right of the page. This creates a copy of the code base under your account on the GitHub server.

  2. Add your forked clone as a remote to the local clone you already have on your local disk:

       git remote add gh-YourLogin git@github.com:YourLogin/brainverse.git
       git fetch gh-YourLogin
    

    For this SSH URLs to work, you have to generate an SSH keypair in your computer and add it to your GitHub account.

    To ease addition of other github repositories as remotes, here is a little bash function/script to add to your ~/.bashrc:

     ghremote () {
             url="$1"
             proj=${url##*/}
             url_=${url%/*}
             login=${url_##*/}
             git remote add gh-$login $url
             git fetch gh-$login
     }
    

    thus you could simply run:

      ghremote git@github.com:YourLogin/brainverse.git
    

    to add the above gh-YourLogin remote.

  3. [Same as Option1 - Step 5] Create a branch (generally off the origin/master) to hold your changes.

  4. [Same as Option 1- Step 6] Work on this copy on your computer using Git to do the version control.

  5. Push to GitHub with:

       git push -u gh-YourLogin feature-my-new-feature
    

    Finally, go to the web page of your fork of the Brainverse repo, and click 'Pull request' (PR) to send your changes to the maintainers for review. This will send an email to the committers. You can commit new changes to this branch and keep pushing to your remote -- github automatically adds them to your previously opened PR.

(If any of the above seems like magic to you, then look up the Git documentation on the web.)

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