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commit 4a57a44474369d769e2cd157baf877f8d160c437 1 parent 90fb527
@rileydutton rileydutton authored
Showing with 2 additions and 2 deletions.
  1. +2 −2 _posts/2012-06-22-optimizing-performance.md
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4 _posts/2012-06-22-optimizing-performance.md
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ Network Connection Performance
Network connection refers to two things: the amount of information your connection can carry at once ("bandwidth") and the speed at which it can make a round-trip to the Roll20 servers ("latency").
-The virtual tabletop itself is very lightweight from a bandwidth perspective. Common actions such as sending a chat message or moving a token require very little data. In fact, you and your players will spend much more time downloading image files for tokens and maps included in the campaign that you will due to performing actions in the interface. For example, you would need to move 1,000 tokens at the same time to generate as much data as it takes to download one small 7 KB token image. This means that even if you have a "slow" connection (e.g. 768 Kb/s, a common low-end DSL speed), your use of the Roll20 tabletop should not be very affected. A slow bandwidth will mostly cause you to have a long initial load time, and you may see images loading in slowly if your GM adds more throughout the game.
+The virtual tabletop itself is very lightweight from a bandwidth perspective. Common actions such as sending a chat message or moving a token require very little data. In fact, you and your players will spend much more time downloading image files for tokens and maps included in the campaign than you will due to performing actions in the interface. For example, you would need to move 1,000 tokens at the same time to generate as much data as it takes to download one small 7 KB token image. This means that even if you have a "slow" connection (e.g. 768 Kb/s, a common low-end DSL speed), your use of the Roll20 tabletop should not be very affected. A slow bandwidth will mostly cause you to have a long initial load time, and you may see images loading in slowly if your GM adds more throughout the game.
Latency, on the other hand, determines how quickly you'll receive changes during gameplay. If you are located far away from the Roll20 servers (in Chicago, IL, USA) or have a very unreliable connection (such as via a 3G cellular signal), you may experience high latency. Roll20 is designed to be fairly fault-tolerant, so you'll still be able to participate, but you may experience delays of several seconds between someone moving a token piece and it appearing to move on your screen.
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ By far the part of Roll20 most-affected by your network connection is the integr
Graphics Rendering Performance
------------------------------
-The graphics rendering performance of your computer is determined by several things, including having an up-to-date browser, your CPU speed, amount of available system memory, and your graphics card. While you certainly don't need a high-end gaming PC to use Roll20, using Roll20 on an underpowered netbook computer may cause you to experience jerky or unresponsive performance. For best results, consider using a mid-range computer (one built in the last 3 or 4 years should be more than sufficient, and old computers may be fine as well) with a dedicated graphics card and a screen resolution of at least 1280x1024.
+The graphics rendering performance of your computer is determined by several things, including having an up-to-date browser, your CPU speed, amount of available system memory, and your graphics card. While you certainly don't need a high-end gaming PC to use Roll20, playing on an underpowered netbook computer may cause you to experience jerky or unresponsive performance. For best results, consider using a mid-range computer (one built in the last 3 or 4 years should be more than sufficient, and old computers may be fine as well) with a dedicated graphics card and a screen resolution of at least 1280x1024.
The graphics rendering of your computer directly affects how quickly things can be drawn on your screen as the scene changes. So when a token is moved or added, or you zoom, or scroll/pan around the map, the screen is being constantly redrawn. The better your graphics rendering performance, the smoother those operations will "feel".
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