Skip to content
New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Rust unstable features needed for the kernel #2

Open
23 of 65 tasks
ojeda opened this issue Aug 28, 2020 · 52 comments
Open
23 of 65 tasks

Rust unstable features needed for the kernel #2

ojeda opened this issue Aug 28, 2020 · 52 comments
Labels
meta Meta issue. • toolchain Related to `rustc`, `bindgen`, `rustdoc`, LLVM, Clippy...

Comments

@ojeda
Copy link
Member

ojeda commented Aug 28, 2020

Unstable features (including language, library, tools...) we currently use.

See as well:

Required (we almost certainly want them)

Good to have (we could workaround if needed)

Low priority (we will likely not use them in the end)

  • ...

Done (i.e. stabilized, or not needed anymore, etc.)

@ojeda ojeda added this to the Rust features milestone Aug 28, 2020
@ojeda ojeda pinned this issue Aug 28, 2020
ojeda added a commit that referenced this issue Sep 7, 2020
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <miguel.ojeda.sandonis@gmail.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
Allocating memory with regulator_list_mutex held makes lockdep unhappy
when memory pressure makes the system do fs_reclaim on eg. eMMC using
a regulator. Push the lock inside regulator_init_coupling() after the
allocation.

======================================================
WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
5.7.13+ #533 Not tainted
------------------------------------------------------
kswapd0/383 is trying to acquire lock:
cca78ca4 (&sbi->write_io[i][j].io_rwsem){++++}-{3:3}, at: __submit_merged_write_cond+0x104/0x154
but task is already holding lock:
c0e38518 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x0/0x50
which lock already depends on the new lock.
the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:
-> #2 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}:
       fs_reclaim_acquire.part.11+0x40/0x50
       fs_reclaim_acquire+0x24/0x28
       __kmalloc+0x54/0x218
       regulator_register+0x860/0x1584
       dummy_regulator_probe+0x60/0xa8
[...]
other info that might help us debug this:

Chain exists of:
  &sbi->write_io[i][j].io_rwsem --> regulator_list_mutex --> fs_reclaim

Possible unsafe locking scenario:

       CPU0                    CPU1
       ----                    ----
  lock(fs_reclaim);
                               lock(regulator_list_mutex);
                               lock(fs_reclaim);
  lock(&sbi->write_io[i][j].io_rwsem);
 *** DEADLOCK ***

1 lock held by kswapd0/383:
 #0: c0e38518 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x0/0x50
[...]

Fixes: d8ca7d1 ("regulator: core: Introduce API for regulators coupling customization")
Signed-off-by: Michał Mirosław <mirq-linux@rere.qmqm.pl>
Reviewed-by: Dmitry Osipenko <digetx@gmail.com>
Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/1a889cf7f61c6429c9e6b34ddcdde99be77a26b6.1597195321.git.mirq-linux@rere.qmqm.pl
Signed-off-by: Mark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
With the conversion of the tree locks to rwsem I got the following
lockdep splat:

  ======================================================
  WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
  5.8.0-rc7-00165-g04ec4da5f45f-dirty #922 Not tainted
  ------------------------------------------------------
  compsize/11122 is trying to acquire lock:
  ffff889fabca8768 (&mm->mmap_lock#2){++++}-{3:3}, at: __might_fault+0x3e/0x90

  but task is already holding lock:
  ffff889fe720fe40 (btrfs-fs-00){++++}-{3:3}, at: __btrfs_tree_read_lock+0x39/0x180

  which lock already depends on the new lock.

  the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

  -> #2 (btrfs-fs-00){++++}-{3:3}:
	 down_write_nested+0x3b/0x70
	 __btrfs_tree_lock+0x24/0x120
	 btrfs_search_slot+0x756/0x990
	 btrfs_lookup_inode+0x3a/0xb4
	 __btrfs_update_delayed_inode+0x93/0x270
	 btrfs_async_run_delayed_root+0x168/0x230
	 btrfs_work_helper+0xd4/0x570
	 process_one_work+0x2ad/0x5f0
	 worker_thread+0x3a/0x3d0
	 kthread+0x133/0x150
	 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30

  -> #1 (&delayed_node->mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 btrfs_delayed_update_inode+0x50/0x440
	 btrfs_update_inode+0x8a/0xf0
	 btrfs_dirty_inode+0x5b/0xd0
	 touch_atime+0xa1/0xd0
	 btrfs_file_mmap+0x3f/0x60
	 mmap_region+0x3a4/0x640
	 do_mmap+0x376/0x580
	 vm_mmap_pgoff+0xd5/0x120
	 ksys_mmap_pgoff+0x193/0x230
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #0 (&mm->mmap_lock#2){++++}-{3:3}:
	 __lock_acquire+0x1272/0x2310
	 lock_acquire+0x9e/0x360
	 __might_fault+0x68/0x90
	 _copy_to_user+0x1e/0x80
	 copy_to_sk.isra.32+0x121/0x300
	 search_ioctl+0x106/0x200
	 btrfs_ioctl_tree_search_v2+0x7b/0xf0
	 btrfs_ioctl+0x106f/0x30a0
	 ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
	 __x64_sys_ioctl+0x16/0x20
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  other info that might help us debug this:

  Chain exists of:
    &mm->mmap_lock#2 --> &delayed_node->mutex --> btrfs-fs-00

   Possible unsafe locking scenario:

	 CPU0                    CPU1
	 ----                    ----
    lock(btrfs-fs-00);
				 lock(&delayed_node->mutex);
				 lock(btrfs-fs-00);
    lock(&mm->mmap_lock#2);

   *** DEADLOCK ***

  1 lock held by compsize/11122:
   #0: ffff889fe720fe40 (btrfs-fs-00){++++}-{3:3}, at: __btrfs_tree_read_lock+0x39/0x180

  stack backtrace:
  CPU: 17 PID: 11122 Comm: compsize Kdump: loaded Not tainted 5.8.0-rc7-00165-g04ec4da5f45f-dirty #922
  Hardware name: Quanta Tioga Pass Single Side 01-0030993006/Tioga Pass Single Side, BIOS F08_3A18 12/20/2018
  Call Trace:
   dump_stack+0x78/0xa0
   check_noncircular+0x165/0x180
   __lock_acquire+0x1272/0x2310
   lock_acquire+0x9e/0x360
   ? __might_fault+0x3e/0x90
   ? find_held_lock+0x72/0x90
   __might_fault+0x68/0x90
   ? __might_fault+0x3e/0x90
   _copy_to_user+0x1e/0x80
   copy_to_sk.isra.32+0x121/0x300
   ? btrfs_search_forward+0x2a6/0x360
   search_ioctl+0x106/0x200
   btrfs_ioctl_tree_search_v2+0x7b/0xf0
   btrfs_ioctl+0x106f/0x30a0
   ? __do_sys_newfstat+0x5a/0x70
   ? ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
   ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
   __x64_sys_ioctl+0x16/0x20
   do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
   entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

The problem is we're doing a copy_to_user() while holding tree locks,
which can deadlock if we have to do a page fault for the copy_to_user().
This exists even without my locking changes, so it needs to be fixed.
Rework the search ioctl to do the pre-fault and then
copy_to_user_nofault for the copying.

CC: stable@vger.kernel.org # 4.4+
Reviewed-by: Filipe Manana <fdmanana@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
Reviewed-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
I got the following lockdep splat while testing:

  ======================================================
  WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
  5.8.0-rc7-00172-g021118712e59 #932 Not tainted
  ------------------------------------------------------
  btrfs/229626 is trying to acquire lock:
  ffffffff828513f0 (cpu_hotplug_lock){++++}-{0:0}, at: alloc_workqueue+0x378/0x450

  but task is already holding lock:
  ffff889dd3889518 (&fs_info->scrub_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_scrub_dev+0x11c/0x630

  which lock already depends on the new lock.

  the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

  -> #7 (&fs_info->scrub_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 btrfs_scrub_dev+0x11c/0x630
	 btrfs_dev_replace_by_ioctl.cold.21+0x10a/0x1d4
	 btrfs_ioctl+0x2799/0x30a0
	 ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
	 __x64_sys_ioctl+0x16/0x20
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #6 (&fs_devs->device_list_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 btrfs_run_dev_stats+0x49/0x480
	 commit_cowonly_roots+0xb5/0x2a0
	 btrfs_commit_transaction+0x516/0xa60
	 sync_filesystem+0x6b/0x90
	 generic_shutdown_super+0x22/0x100
	 kill_anon_super+0xe/0x30
	 btrfs_kill_super+0x12/0x20
	 deactivate_locked_super+0x29/0x60
	 cleanup_mnt+0xb8/0x140
	 task_work_run+0x6d/0xb0
	 __prepare_exit_to_usermode+0x1cc/0x1e0
	 do_syscall_64+0x5c/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #5 (&fs_info->tree_log_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 btrfs_commit_transaction+0x4bb/0xa60
	 sync_filesystem+0x6b/0x90
	 generic_shutdown_super+0x22/0x100
	 kill_anon_super+0xe/0x30
	 btrfs_kill_super+0x12/0x20
	 deactivate_locked_super+0x29/0x60
	 cleanup_mnt+0xb8/0x140
	 task_work_run+0x6d/0xb0
	 __prepare_exit_to_usermode+0x1cc/0x1e0
	 do_syscall_64+0x5c/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #4 (&fs_info->reloc_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 btrfs_record_root_in_trans+0x43/0x70
	 start_transaction+0xd1/0x5d0
	 btrfs_dirty_inode+0x42/0xd0
	 touch_atime+0xa1/0xd0
	 btrfs_file_mmap+0x3f/0x60
	 mmap_region+0x3a4/0x640
	 do_mmap+0x376/0x580
	 vm_mmap_pgoff+0xd5/0x120
	 ksys_mmap_pgoff+0x193/0x230
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #3 (&mm->mmap_lock#2){++++}-{3:3}:
	 __might_fault+0x68/0x90
	 _copy_to_user+0x1e/0x80
	 perf_read+0x141/0x2c0
	 vfs_read+0xad/0x1b0
	 ksys_read+0x5f/0xe0
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #2 (&cpuctx_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 perf_event_init_cpu+0x88/0x150
	 perf_event_init+0x1db/0x20b
	 start_kernel+0x3ae/0x53c
	 secondary_startup_64+0xa4/0xb0

  -> #1 (pmus_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x9f/0x930
	 perf_event_init_cpu+0x4f/0x150
	 cpuhp_invoke_callback+0xb1/0x900
	 _cpu_up.constprop.26+0x9f/0x130
	 cpu_up+0x7b/0xc0
	 bringup_nonboot_cpus+0x4f/0x60
	 smp_init+0x26/0x71
	 kernel_init_freeable+0x110/0x258
	 kernel_init+0xa/0x103
	 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30

  -> #0 (cpu_hotplug_lock){++++}-{0:0}:
	 __lock_acquire+0x1272/0x2310
	 lock_acquire+0x9e/0x360
	 cpus_read_lock+0x39/0xb0
	 alloc_workqueue+0x378/0x450
	 __btrfs_alloc_workqueue+0x15d/0x200
	 btrfs_alloc_workqueue+0x51/0x160
	 scrub_workers_get+0x5a/0x170
	 btrfs_scrub_dev+0x18c/0x630
	 btrfs_dev_replace_by_ioctl.cold.21+0x10a/0x1d4
	 btrfs_ioctl+0x2799/0x30a0
	 ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
	 __x64_sys_ioctl+0x16/0x20
	 do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  other info that might help us debug this:

  Chain exists of:
    cpu_hotplug_lock --> &fs_devs->device_list_mutex --> &fs_info->scrub_lock

   Possible unsafe locking scenario:

	 CPU0                    CPU1
	 ----                    ----
    lock(&fs_info->scrub_lock);
				 lock(&fs_devs->device_list_mutex);
				 lock(&fs_info->scrub_lock);
    lock(cpu_hotplug_lock);

   *** DEADLOCK ***

  2 locks held by btrfs/229626:
   #0: ffff88bfe8bb86e0 (&fs_devs->device_list_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_scrub_dev+0xbd/0x630
   #1: ffff889dd3889518 (&fs_info->scrub_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_scrub_dev+0x11c/0x630

  stack backtrace:
  CPU: 15 PID: 229626 Comm: btrfs Kdump: loaded Not tainted 5.8.0-rc7-00172-g021118712e59 #932
  Hardware name: Quanta Tioga Pass Single Side 01-0030993006/Tioga Pass Single Side, BIOS F08_3A18 12/20/2018
  Call Trace:
   dump_stack+0x78/0xa0
   check_noncircular+0x165/0x180
   __lock_acquire+0x1272/0x2310
   lock_acquire+0x9e/0x360
   ? alloc_workqueue+0x378/0x450
   cpus_read_lock+0x39/0xb0
   ? alloc_workqueue+0x378/0x450
   alloc_workqueue+0x378/0x450
   ? rcu_read_lock_sched_held+0x52/0x80
   __btrfs_alloc_workqueue+0x15d/0x200
   btrfs_alloc_workqueue+0x51/0x160
   scrub_workers_get+0x5a/0x170
   btrfs_scrub_dev+0x18c/0x630
   ? start_transaction+0xd1/0x5d0
   btrfs_dev_replace_by_ioctl.cold.21+0x10a/0x1d4
   btrfs_ioctl+0x2799/0x30a0
   ? do_sigaction+0x102/0x250
   ? lockdep_hardirqs_on_prepare+0xca/0x160
   ? _raw_spin_unlock_irq+0x24/0x30
   ? trace_hardirqs_on+0x1c/0xe0
   ? _raw_spin_unlock_irq+0x24/0x30
   ? do_sigaction+0x102/0x250
   ? ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
   ksys_ioctl+0x83/0xc0
   __x64_sys_ioctl+0x16/0x20
   do_syscall_64+0x50/0x90
   entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

This happens because we're allocating the scrub workqueues under the
scrub and device list mutex, which brings in a whole host of other
dependencies.

Because the work queue allocation is done with GFP_KERNEL, it can
trigger reclaim, which can lead to a transaction commit, which in turns
needs the device_list_mutex, it can lead to a deadlock. A different
problem for which this fix is a solution.

Fix this by moving the actual allocation outside of the
scrub lock, and then only take the lock once we're ready to actually
assign them to the fs_info.  We'll now have to cleanup the workqueues in
a few more places, so I've added a helper to do the refcount dance to
safely free the workqueues.

CC: stable@vger.kernel.org # 5.4+
Reviewed-by: Filipe Manana <fdmanana@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
Reviewed-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
…emory

If the hypervisor doesn't support hugepages, the kernel ends up allocating a large
number of page table pages. The early page table allocation was wrongly
setting the max memblock limit to ppc64_rma_size with radix translation
which resulted in boot failure as shown below.

Kernel panic - not syncing:
early_alloc_pgtable: Failed to allocate 16777216 bytes align=0x1000000 nid=-1 from=0x0000000000000000 max_addr=0xffffffffffffffff
 CPU: 0 PID: 0 Comm: swapper Not tainted 5.8.0-24.9-default+ #2
 Call Trace:
 [c0000000016f3d00] [c0000000007c6470] dump_stack+0xc4/0x114 (unreliable)
 [c0000000016f3d40] [c00000000014c78c] panic+0x164/0x418
 [c0000000016f3dd0] [c000000000098890] early_alloc_pgtable+0xe0/0xec
 [c0000000016f3e60] [c0000000010a5440] radix__early_init_mmu+0x360/0x4b4
 [c0000000016f3ef0] [c000000001099bac] early_init_mmu+0x1c/0x3c
 [c0000000016f3f10] [c00000000109a320] early_setup+0x134/0x170

This was because the kernel was checking for the radix feature before we enable the
feature via mmu_features. This resulted in the kernel using hash restrictions on
radix.

Rework the early init code such that the kernel boot with memblock restrictions
as imposed by hash. At that point, the kernel still hasn't finalized the
translation the kernel will end up using.

We have three different ways of detecting radix.

1. dt_cpu_ftrs_scan -> used only in case of PowerNV
2. ibm,pa-features -> Used when we don't use cpu_dt_ftr_scan
3. CAS -> Where we negotiate with hypervisor about the supported translation.

We look at 1 or 2 early in the boot and after that, we look at the CAS vector to
finalize the translation the kernel will use. We also support a kernel command
line option (disable_radix) to switch to hash.

Update the memblock limit after mmu_early_init_devtree() if the kernel is going
to use radix translation. This forces some of the memblock allocations we do before
mmu_early_init_devtree() to be within the RMA limit.

Fixes: 2bfd65e ("powerpc/mm/radix: Add radix callbacks for early init routines")
Reported-by: Shirisha Ganta <shiganta@in.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Hari Bathini <hbathini@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200828100852.426575-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
…s metrics" test

Linux 5.9 introduced perf test case "Parse and process metrics" and
on s390 this test case always dumps core:

  [root@t35lp67 perf]# ./perf test -vvvv -F 67
  67: Parse and process metrics                             :
  --- start ---
  metric expr inst_retired.any / cpu_clk_unhalted.thread for IPC
  parsing metric: inst_retired.any / cpu_clk_unhalted.thread
  Segmentation fault (core dumped)
  [root@t35lp67 perf]#

I debugged this core dump and gdb shows this call chain:

  (gdb) where
   #0  0x000003ffabc3192a in __strnlen_c_1 () from /lib64/libc.so.6
   #1  0x000003ffabc293de in strcasestr () from /lib64/libc.so.6
   #2  0x0000000001102ba2 in match_metric(list=0x1e6ea20 "inst_retired.any",
            n=<optimized out>)
       at util/metricgroup.c:368
   #3  find_metric (map=<optimized out>, map=<optimized out>,
           metric=0x1e6ea20 "inst_retired.any")
      at util/metricgroup.c:765
   #4  __resolve_metric (ids=0x0, map=<optimized out>, metric_list=0x0,
           metric_no_group=<optimized out>, m=<optimized out>)
      at util/metricgroup.c:844
   #5  resolve_metric (ids=0x0, map=0x0, metric_list=0x0,
          metric_no_group=<optimized out>)
      at util/metricgroup.c:881
   #6  metricgroup__add_metric (metric=<optimized out>,
        metric_no_group=metric_no_group@entry=false, events=<optimized out>,
        events@entry=0x3ffd84fb878, metric_list=0x0,
        metric_list@entry=0x3ffd84fb868, map=0x0)
      at util/metricgroup.c:943
   #7  0x00000000011034ae in metricgroup__add_metric_list (map=0x13f9828 <map>,
        metric_list=0x3ffd84fb868, events=0x3ffd84fb878,
        metric_no_group=<optimized out>, list=<optimized out>)
      at util/metricgroup.c:988
   #8  parse_groups (perf_evlist=perf_evlist@entry=0x1e70260,
          str=str@entry=0x12f34b2 "IPC", metric_no_group=<optimized out>,
          metric_no_merge=<optimized out>,
          fake_pmu=fake_pmu@entry=0x1462f18 <perf_pmu.fake>,
          metric_events=0x3ffd84fba58, map=0x1)
      at util/metricgroup.c:1040
   #9  0x0000000001103eb2 in metricgroup__parse_groups_test(
  	evlist=evlist@entry=0x1e70260, map=map@entry=0x13f9828 <map>,
  	str=str@entry=0x12f34b2 "IPC",
  	metric_no_group=metric_no_group@entry=false,
  	metric_no_merge=metric_no_merge@entry=false,
  	metric_events=0x3ffd84fba58)
      at util/metricgroup.c:1082
   #10 0x00000000010c84d8 in __compute_metric (ratio2=0x0, name2=0x0,
          ratio1=<synthetic pointer>, name1=0x12f34b2 "IPC",
  	vals=0x3ffd84fbad8, name=0x12f34b2 "IPC")
      at tests/parse-metric.c:159
   #11 compute_metric (ratio=<synthetic pointer>, vals=0x3ffd84fbad8,
  	name=0x12f34b2 "IPC")
      at tests/parse-metric.c:189
   #12 test_ipc () at tests/parse-metric.c:208
.....
..... omitted many more lines

This test case was added with
commit 218ca91 ("perf tests: Add parse metric test for frontend metric").

When I compile with make DEBUG=y it works fine and I do not get a core dump.

It turned out that the above listed function call chain worked on a struct
pmu_event array which requires a trailing element with zeroes which was
missing. The marco map_for_each_event() loops over that array tests for members
metric_expr/metric_name/metric_group being non-NULL. Adding this element fixes
the issue.

Output after:

  [root@t35lp46 perf]# ./perf test 67
  67: Parse and process metrics                             : Ok
  [root@t35lp46 perf]#

Committer notes:

As Ian remarks, this is not s390 specific:

<quote Ian>
  This also shows up with address sanitizer on all architectures
  (perhaps change the patch title) and perhaps add a "Fixes: <commit>"
  tag.

  =================================================================
  ==4718==ERROR: AddressSanitizer: global-buffer-overflow on address
  0x55c93b4d59e8 at pc 0x55c93a1541e2 bp 0x7ffd24327c60 sp
  0x7ffd24327c58
  READ of size 8 at 0x55c93b4d59e8 thread T0
      #0 0x55c93a1541e1 in find_metric tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:764:2
      #1 0x55c93a153e6c in __resolve_metric tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:844:9
      #2 0x55c93a152f18 in resolve_metric tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:881:9
      #3 0x55c93a1528db in metricgroup__add_metric
  tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:943:9
      #4 0x55c93a151996 in metricgroup__add_metric_list
  tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:988:9
      #5 0x55c93a1511b9 in parse_groups tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:1040:8
      #6 0x55c93a1513e1 in metricgroup__parse_groups_test
  tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:1082:9
      #7 0x55c93a0108ae in __compute_metric tools/perf/tests/parse-metric.c:159:8
      #8 0x55c93a010744 in compute_metric tools/perf/tests/parse-metric.c:189:9
      #9 0x55c93a00f5ee in test_ipc tools/perf/tests/parse-metric.c:208:2
      #10 0x55c93a00f1e8 in test__parse_metric
  tools/perf/tests/parse-metric.c:345:2
      #11 0x55c939fd7202 in run_test tools/perf/tests/builtin-test.c:410:9
      #12 0x55c939fd6736 in test_and_print tools/perf/tests/builtin-test.c:440:9
      #13 0x55c939fd58c3 in __cmd_test tools/perf/tests/builtin-test.c:661:4
      #14 0x55c939fd4e02 in cmd_test tools/perf/tests/builtin-test.c:807:9
      #15 0x55c939e4763d in run_builtin tools/perf/perf.c:313:11
      #16 0x55c939e46475 in handle_internal_command tools/perf/perf.c:365:8
      #17 0x55c939e4737e in run_argv tools/perf/perf.c:409:2
      #18 0x55c939e45f7e in main tools/perf/perf.c:539:3

  0x55c93b4d59e8 is located 0 bytes to the right of global variable
  'pme_test' defined in 'tools/perf/tests/parse-metric.c:17:25'
  (0x55c93b4d54a0) of size 1352
  SUMMARY: AddressSanitizer: global-buffer-overflow
  tools/perf/util/metricgroup.c:764:2 in find_metric
  Shadow bytes around the buggy address:
    0x0ab9a7692ae0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692af0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692b00: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692b10: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692b20: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
  =>0x0ab9a7692b30: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00[f9]f9 f9
    0x0ab9a7692b40: f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9
    0x0ab9a7692b50: f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9
    0x0ab9a7692b60: f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692b70: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
    0x0ab9a7692b80: f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9 f9
  Shadow byte legend (one shadow byte represents 8 application bytes):
    Addressable:           00
    Partially addressable: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07
    Heap left redzone:	   fa
    Freed heap region:	   fd
    Stack left redzone:	   f1
    Stack mid redzone:	   f2
    Stack right redzone:     f3
    Stack after return:	   f5
    Stack use after scope:   f8
    Global redzone:          f9
    Global init order:	   f6
    Poisoned by user:        f7
    Container overflow:	   fc
    Array cookie:            ac
    Intra object redzone:    bb
    ASan internal:           fe
    Left alloca redzone:     ca
    Right alloca redzone:    cb
    Shadow gap:              cc
</quote>

I'm also adding the missing "Fixes" tag and setting just .name to NULL,
as doing it that way is more compact (the compiler will zero out
everything else) and the table iterators look for .name being NULL as
the sentinel marking the end of the table.

Fixes: 0a507af ("perf tests: Add parse metric test for ipc metric")
Signed-off-by: Thomas Richter <tmricht@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Sumanth Korikkar <sumanthk@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Sven Schnelle <svens@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200825071211.16959-1-tmricht@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
Yonghong Song says:

====================
Currently, the bpf hashmap iterator takes a bucket_lock, a spin_lock,
before visiting each element in the bucket. This will cause a deadlock
if a map update/delete operates on an element with the same
bucket id of the visited map.

To avoid the deadlock, let us just use rcu_read_lock instead of
bucket_lock. This may result in visiting stale elements, missing some elements,
or repeating some elements, if concurrent map delete/update happens for the
same map. I think using rcu_read_lock is a reasonable compromise.
For users caring stale/missing/repeating element issues, bpf map batch
access syscall interface can be used.

Note that another approach is during bpf_iter link stage, we check
whether the iter program might be able to do update/delete to the visited
map. If it is, reject the link_create. Verifier needs to record whether
an update/delete operation happens for each map for this approach.
I just feel this checking is too specialized, hence still prefer
rcu_read_lock approach.

Patch #1 has the kernel implementation and Patch #2 added a selftest
which can trigger deadlock without Patch #1.
====================

Signed-off-by: Alexei Starovoitov <ast@kernel.org>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The dev_iommu_priv_set() must be called after probe_device(). This fixes
a NULL pointer deference bug when booting a system with kernel cmdline
"intel_iommu=on,igfx_off", where the dev_iommu_priv_set() is abused.

The following stacktrace was produced:

 Command line: BOOT_IMAGE=/isolinux/bzImage console=tty1 intel_iommu=on,igfx_off
 ...
 DMAR: Host address width 39
 DMAR: DRHD base: 0x000000fed90000 flags: 0x0
 DMAR: dmar0: reg_base_addr fed90000 ver 1:0 cap 1c0000c40660462 ecap 19e2ff0505e
 DMAR: DRHD base: 0x000000fed91000 flags: 0x1
 DMAR: dmar1: reg_base_addr fed91000 ver 1:0 cap d2008c40660462 ecap f050da
 DMAR: RMRR base: 0x0000009aa9f000 end: 0x0000009aabefff
 DMAR: RMRR base: 0x0000009d000000 end: 0x0000009f7fffff
 DMAR: No ATSR found
 BUG: kernel NULL pointer dereference, address: 0000000000000038
 #PF: supervisor write access in kernel mode
 #PF: error_code(0x0002) - not-present page
 PGD 0 P4D 0
 Oops: 0002 [#1] SMP PTI
 CPU: 1 PID: 1 Comm: swapper/0 Not tainted 5.9.0-devel+ #2
 Hardware name: LENOVO 20HGS0TW00/20HGS0TW00, BIOS N1WET46S (1.25s ) 03/30/2018
 RIP: 0010:intel_iommu_init+0xed0/0x1136
 Code: fe e9 61 02 00 00 bb f4 ff ff ff e9 57 02 00 00 48 63 d1 48 c1 e2 04 48
       03 50 20 48 8b 12 48 85 d2 74 0b 48 8b 92 d0 02 00 00 48 89 7a 38 ff c1
       e9 15 f5 ff ff 48 c7 c7 60 99 ac a7 49 c7 c7 a0
 RSP: 0000:ffff96d180073dd0 EFLAGS: 00010282
 RAX: ffff8c91037a7d20 RBX: 0000000000000000 RCX: 0000000000000000
 RDX: 0000000000000000 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: ffffffffffffffff
 RBP: ffff96d180073e90 R08: 0000000000000001 R09: ffff8c91039fe3c0
 R10: 0000000000000226 R11: 0000000000000226 R12: 000000000000000b
 R13: ffff8c910367c650 R14: ffffffffa8426d60 R15: 0000000000000000
 FS:  0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff8c9107480000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
 CS:  0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033
 CR2: 0000000000000038 CR3: 00000004b100a001 CR4: 00000000003706e0
 Call Trace:
  ? _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore+0x1f/0x30
  ? call_rcu+0x10e/0x320
  ? trace_hardirqs_on+0x2c/0xd0
  ? rdinit_setup+0x2c/0x2c
  ? e820__memblock_setup+0x8b/0x8b
  pci_iommu_init+0x16/0x3f
  do_one_initcall+0x46/0x1e4
  kernel_init_freeable+0x169/0x1b2
  ? rest_init+0x9f/0x9f
  kernel_init+0xa/0x101
  ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30
 Modules linked in:
 CR2: 0000000000000038
 ---[ end trace 3653722a6f936f18 ]---

Fixes: 01b9d4e ("iommu/vt-d: Use dev_iommu_priv_get/set()")
Reported-by: Torsten Hilbrich <torsten.hilbrich@secunet.com>
Reported-by: Wendy Wang <wendy.wang@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Lu Baolu <baolu.lu@linux.intel.com>
Tested-by: Torsten Hilbrich <torsten.hilbrich@secunet.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-iommu/96717683-70be-7388-3d2f-61131070a96a@secunet.com/
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200903065132.16879-1-baolu.lu@linux.intel.com
Signed-off-by: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
Luo bin says:

====================
hinic: BugFixes

The bugs fixed in this patchset have been present since the following
commits:
patch #1: Fixes: 00e57a6 ("net-next/hinic: Add Tx operation")
patch #2: Fixes: 5e126e7 ("hinic: add firmware update support")
====================

Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
Nikolay reported a lockdep splat in generic/476 that I could reproduce
with btrfs/187.

  ======================================================
  WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
  5.9.0-rc2+ #1 Tainted: G        W
  ------------------------------------------------------
  kswapd0/100 is trying to acquire lock:
  ffff9e8ef38b6268 (&delayed_node->mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330

  but task is already holding lock:
  ffffffffa9d74700 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x5/0x30

  which lock already depends on the new lock.

  the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

  -> #2 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}:
	 fs_reclaim_acquire+0x65/0x80
	 slab_pre_alloc_hook.constprop.0+0x20/0x200
	 kmem_cache_alloc_trace+0x3a/0x1a0
	 btrfs_alloc_device+0x43/0x210
	 add_missing_dev+0x20/0x90
	 read_one_chunk+0x301/0x430
	 btrfs_read_sys_array+0x17b/0x1b0
	 open_ctree+0xa62/0x1896
	 btrfs_mount_root.cold+0x12/0xea
	 legacy_get_tree+0x30/0x50
	 vfs_get_tree+0x28/0xc0
	 vfs_kern_mount.part.0+0x71/0xb0
	 btrfs_mount+0x10d/0x379
	 legacy_get_tree+0x30/0x50
	 vfs_get_tree+0x28/0xc0
	 path_mount+0x434/0xc00
	 __x64_sys_mount+0xe3/0x120
	 do_syscall_64+0x33/0x40
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #1 (&fs_info->chunk_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock+0x7e/0x7e0
	 btrfs_chunk_alloc+0x125/0x3a0
	 find_free_extent+0xdf6/0x1210
	 btrfs_reserve_extent+0xb3/0x1b0
	 btrfs_alloc_tree_block+0xb0/0x310
	 alloc_tree_block_no_bg_flush+0x4a/0x60
	 __btrfs_cow_block+0x11a/0x530
	 btrfs_cow_block+0x104/0x220
	 btrfs_search_slot+0x52e/0x9d0
	 btrfs_lookup_inode+0x2a/0x8f
	 __btrfs_update_delayed_inode+0x80/0x240
	 btrfs_commit_inode_delayed_inode+0x119/0x120
	 btrfs_evict_inode+0x357/0x500
	 evict+0xcf/0x1f0
	 vfs_rmdir.part.0+0x149/0x160
	 do_rmdir+0x136/0x1a0
	 do_syscall_64+0x33/0x40
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #0 (&delayed_node->mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __lock_acquire+0x1184/0x1fa0
	 lock_acquire+0xa4/0x3d0
	 __mutex_lock+0x7e/0x7e0
	 __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330
	 btrfs_evict_inode+0x24c/0x500
	 evict+0xcf/0x1f0
	 dispose_list+0x48/0x70
	 prune_icache_sb+0x44/0x50
	 super_cache_scan+0x161/0x1e0
	 do_shrink_slab+0x178/0x3c0
	 shrink_slab+0x17c/0x290
	 shrink_node+0x2b2/0x6d0
	 balance_pgdat+0x30a/0x670
	 kswapd+0x213/0x4c0
	 kthread+0x138/0x160
	 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30

  other info that might help us debug this:

  Chain exists of:
    &delayed_node->mutex --> &fs_info->chunk_mutex --> fs_reclaim

   Possible unsafe locking scenario:

	 CPU0                    CPU1
	 ----                    ----
    lock(fs_reclaim);
				 lock(&fs_info->chunk_mutex);
				 lock(fs_reclaim);
    lock(&delayed_node->mutex);

   *** DEADLOCK ***

  3 locks held by kswapd0/100:
   #0: ffffffffa9d74700 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x5/0x30
   #1: ffffffffa9d65c50 (shrinker_rwsem){++++}-{3:3}, at: shrink_slab+0x115/0x290
   #2: ffff9e8e9da260e0 (&type->s_umount_key#48){++++}-{3:3}, at: super_cache_scan+0x38/0x1e0

  stack backtrace:
  CPU: 1 PID: 100 Comm: kswapd0 Tainted: G        W         5.9.0-rc2+ #1
  Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (Q35 + ICH9, 2009), BIOS 1.13.0-2.fc32 04/01/2014
  Call Trace:
   dump_stack+0x92/0xc8
   check_noncircular+0x12d/0x150
   __lock_acquire+0x1184/0x1fa0
   lock_acquire+0xa4/0x3d0
   ? __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330
   __mutex_lock+0x7e/0x7e0
   ? __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330
   ? __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330
   ? lock_acquire+0xa4/0x3d0
   ? btrfs_evict_inode+0x11e/0x500
   ? find_held_lock+0x2b/0x80
   __btrfs_release_delayed_node.part.0+0x3f/0x330
   btrfs_evict_inode+0x24c/0x500
   evict+0xcf/0x1f0
   dispose_list+0x48/0x70
   prune_icache_sb+0x44/0x50
   super_cache_scan+0x161/0x1e0
   do_shrink_slab+0x178/0x3c0
   shrink_slab+0x17c/0x290
   shrink_node+0x2b2/0x6d0
   balance_pgdat+0x30a/0x670
   kswapd+0x213/0x4c0
   ? _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore+0x46/0x60
   ? add_wait_queue_exclusive+0x70/0x70
   ? balance_pgdat+0x670/0x670
   kthread+0x138/0x160
   ? kthread_create_worker_on_cpu+0x40/0x40
   ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30

This is because we are holding the chunk_mutex when we call
btrfs_alloc_device, which does a GFP_KERNEL allocation.  We don't want
to switch that to a GFP_NOFS lock because this is the only place where
it matters.  So instead use memalloc_nofs_save() around the allocation
in order to avoid the lockdep splat.

Reported-by: Nikolay Borisov <nborisov@suse.com>
CC: stable@vger.kernel.org # 4.4+
Reviewed-by: Anand Jain <anand.jain@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
Reviewed-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
…arnings

Since commit 845e0eb ("net: change addr_list_lock back to static
key"), cascaded DSA setups (DSA switch port as DSA master for another
DSA switch port) are emitting this lockdep warning:

============================================
WARNING: possible recursive locking detected
5.8.0-rc1-00133-g923e4b5032dd-dirty #208 Not tainted
--------------------------------------------
dhcpcd/323 is trying to acquire lock:
ffff000066dd4268 (&dsa_master_addr_list_lock_key/1){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_mc_sync+0x44/0x90

but task is already holding lock:
ffff00006608c268 (&dsa_master_addr_list_lock_key/1){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_mc_sync+0x44/0x90

other info that might help us debug this:
 Possible unsafe locking scenario:

       CPU0
       ----
  lock(&dsa_master_addr_list_lock_key/1);
  lock(&dsa_master_addr_list_lock_key/1);

 *** DEADLOCK ***

 May be due to missing lock nesting notation

3 locks held by dhcpcd/323:
 #0: ffffdbd1381dda18 (rtnl_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: rtnl_lock+0x24/0x30
 #1: ffff00006614b268 (_xmit_ETHER){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_set_rx_mode+0x28/0x48
 #2: ffff00006608c268 (&dsa_master_addr_list_lock_key/1){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_mc_sync+0x44/0x90

stack backtrace:
Call trace:
 dump_backtrace+0x0/0x1e0
 show_stack+0x20/0x30
 dump_stack+0xec/0x158
 __lock_acquire+0xca0/0x2398
 lock_acquire+0xe8/0x440
 _raw_spin_lock_nested+0x64/0x90
 dev_mc_sync+0x44/0x90
 dsa_slave_set_rx_mode+0x34/0x50
 __dev_set_rx_mode+0x60/0xa0
 dev_mc_sync+0x84/0x90
 dsa_slave_set_rx_mode+0x34/0x50
 __dev_set_rx_mode+0x60/0xa0
 dev_set_rx_mode+0x30/0x48
 __dev_open+0x10c/0x180
 __dev_change_flags+0x170/0x1c8
 dev_change_flags+0x2c/0x70
 devinet_ioctl+0x774/0x878
 inet_ioctl+0x348/0x3b0
 sock_do_ioctl+0x50/0x310
 sock_ioctl+0x1f8/0x580
 ksys_ioctl+0xb0/0xf0
 __arm64_sys_ioctl+0x28/0x38
 el0_svc_common.constprop.0+0x7c/0x180
 do_el0_svc+0x2c/0x98
 el0_sync_handler+0x9c/0x1b8
 el0_sync+0x158/0x180

Since DSA never made use of the netdev API for describing links between
upper devices and lower devices, the dev->lower_level value of a DSA
switch interface would be 1, which would warn when it is a DSA master.

We can use netdev_upper_dev_link() to describe the relationship between
a DSA slave and a DSA master. To be precise, a DSA "slave" (switch port)
is an "upper" to a DSA "master" (host port). The relationship is "many
uppers to one lower", like in the case of VLAN. So, for that reason, we
use the same function as VLAN uses.

There might be a chance that somebody will try to take hold of this
interface and use it immediately after register_netdev() and before
netdev_upper_dev_link(). To avoid that, we do the registration and
linkage while holding the RTNL, and we use the RTNL-locked cousin of
register_netdev(), which is register_netdevice().

Since this warning was not there when lockdep was using dynamic keys for
addr_list_lock, we are blaming the lockdep patch itself. The network
stack _has_ been using static lockdep keys before, and it _is_ likely
that stacked DSA setups have been triggering these lockdep warnings
since forever, however I can't test very old kernels on this particular
stacked DSA setup, to ensure I'm not in fact introducing regressions.

Fixes: 845e0eb ("net: change addr_list_lock back to static key")
Suggested-by: Cong Wang <xiyou.wangcong@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Vladimir Oltean <olteanv@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Florian Fainelli <f.fainelli@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
syzbot reported twice a lockdep issue in fib6_del() [1]
which I think is caused by net->ipv6.fib6_null_entry
having a NULL fib6_table pointer.

fib6_del() already checks for fib6_null_entry special
case, we only need to return earlier.

Bug seems to occur very rarely, I have thus chosen
a 'bug origin' that makes backports not too complex.

[1]
WARNING: suspicious RCU usage
5.9.0-rc4-syzkaller #0 Not tainted
-----------------------------
net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:1996 suspicious rcu_dereference_protected() usage!

other info that might help us debug this:

rcu_scheduler_active = 2, debug_locks = 1
4 locks held by syz-executor.5/8095:
 #0: ffffffff8a7ea708 (rtnl_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: ppp_release+0x178/0x240 drivers/net/ppp/ppp_generic.c:401
 #1: ffff88804c422dd8 (&net->ipv6.fib6_gc_lock){+.-.}-{2:2}, at: spin_trylock_bh include/linux/spinlock.h:414 [inline]
 #1: ffff88804c422dd8 (&net->ipv6.fib6_gc_lock){+.-.}-{2:2}, at: fib6_run_gc+0x21b/0x2d0 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2312
 #2: ffffffff89bd6a40 (rcu_read_lock){....}-{1:2}, at: __fib6_clean_all+0x0/0x290 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2613
 #3: ffff8880a82e6430 (&tb->tb6_lock){+.-.}-{2:2}, at: spin_lock_bh include/linux/spinlock.h:359 [inline]
 #3: ffff8880a82e6430 (&tb->tb6_lock){+.-.}-{2:2}, at: __fib6_clean_all+0x107/0x290 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2245

stack backtrace:
CPU: 1 PID: 8095 Comm: syz-executor.5 Not tainted 5.9.0-rc4-syzkaller #0
Hardware name: Google Google Compute Engine/Google Compute Engine, BIOS Google 01/01/2011
Call Trace:
 __dump_stack lib/dump_stack.c:77 [inline]
 dump_stack+0x198/0x1fd lib/dump_stack.c:118
 fib6_del+0x12b4/0x1630 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:1996
 fib6_clean_node+0x39b/0x570 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2180
 fib6_walk_continue+0x4aa/0x8e0 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2102
 fib6_walk+0x182/0x370 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2150
 fib6_clean_tree+0xdb/0x120 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2230
 __fib6_clean_all+0x120/0x290 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2246
 fib6_clean_all net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2257 [inline]
 fib6_run_gc+0x113/0x2d0 net/ipv6/ip6_fib.c:2320
 ndisc_netdev_event+0x217/0x350 net/ipv6/ndisc.c:1805
 notifier_call_chain+0xb5/0x200 kernel/notifier.c:83
 call_netdevice_notifiers_info+0xb5/0x130 net/core/dev.c:2033
 call_netdevice_notifiers_extack net/core/dev.c:2045 [inline]
 call_netdevice_notifiers net/core/dev.c:2059 [inline]
 dev_close_many+0x30b/0x650 net/core/dev.c:1634
 rollback_registered_many+0x3a8/0x1210 net/core/dev.c:9261
 rollback_registered net/core/dev.c:9329 [inline]
 unregister_netdevice_queue+0x2dd/0x570 net/core/dev.c:10410
 unregister_netdevice include/linux/netdevice.h:2774 [inline]
 ppp_release+0x216/0x240 drivers/net/ppp/ppp_generic.c:403
 __fput+0x285/0x920 fs/file_table.c:281
 task_work_run+0xdd/0x190 kernel/task_work.c:141
 tracehook_notify_resume include/linux/tracehook.h:188 [inline]
 exit_to_user_mode_loop kernel/entry/common.c:163 [inline]
 exit_to_user_mode_prepare+0x1e1/0x200 kernel/entry/common.c:190
 syscall_exit_to_user_mode+0x7e/0x2e0 kernel/entry/common.c:265
 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

Fixes: 421842e ("net/ipv6: Add fib6_null_entry")
Signed-off-by: Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com>
Cc: David Ahern <dsahern@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: David Ahern <dsahern@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
Ido Schimmel says:

====================
net: Fix bridge enslavement failure

Patch #1 fixes an issue in which an upper netdev cannot be enslaved to a
bridge when it has multiple netdevs with different parent identifiers
beneath it.

Patch #2 adds a test case using two netdevsim instances.
====================

Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
When compiling with DEBUG=1 on Fedora 32 I'm getting crash for 'perf
test signal':

  Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
  0x0000000000c68548 in __test_function ()
  (gdb) bt
  #0  0x0000000000c68548 in __test_function ()
  #1  0x00000000004d62e9 in test_function () at tests/bp_signal.c:61
  #2  0x00000000004d689a in test__bp_signal (test=0xa8e280 <generic_ ...
  #3  0x00000000004b7d49 in run_test (test=0xa8e280 <generic_tests+1 ...
  #4  0x00000000004b7e7f in test_and_print (t=0xa8e280 <generic_test ...
  #5  0x00000000004b8927 in __cmd_test (argc=1, argv=0x7fffffffdce0, ...
  ...

It's caused by the symbol __test_function being in the ".bss" section:

  $ readelf -a ./perf | less
    [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
         Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
    ...
    [28] .bss              NOBITS           0000000000c356a0  008346a0
         00000000000511f8  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     32

  $ nm perf | grep __test_function
  0000000000c68548 B __test_function

I guess most of the time we're just lucky the inline asm ended up in the
".text" section, so making it specific explicit with push and pop
section clauses.

  $ readelf -a ./perf | less
    [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
         Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
    ...
    [13] .text             PROGBITS         0000000000431240  00031240
         0000000000306faa  0000000000000000  AX       0     0     16

  $ nm perf | grep __test_function
  00000000004d62c8 T __test_function

Committer testing:

  $ readelf -wi ~/bin/perf | grep producer -m1
    <c>   DW_AT_producer    : (indirect string, offset: 0x254a): GNU C99 10.2.1 20200723 (Red Hat 10.2.1-1) -mtune=generic -march=x86-64 -ggdb3 -std=gnu99 -fno-omit-frame-pointer -funwind-tables -fstack-protector-all
                                                                                                                                         ^^^^^
                                                                                                                                         ^^^^^
                                                                                                                                         ^^^^^
  $

Before:

  $ perf test signal
  20: Breakpoint overflow signal handler                    : FAILED!
  $

After:

  $ perf test signal
  20: Breakpoint overflow signal handler                    : Ok
  $

Fixes: 8fd34e1 ("perf test: Improve bp_signal")
Signed-off-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@kernel.org>
Tested-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Petlan <mpetlan@redhat.com>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Wang Nan <wangnan0@huawei.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200911130005.1842138-1-jolsa@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The aliases were never released causing the following leaks:

  Indirect leak of 1224 byte(s) in 9 object(s) allocated from:
    #0 0x7feefb830628 in malloc (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasan.so.5+0x107628)
    #1 0x56332c8f1b62 in __perf_pmu__new_alias util/pmu.c:322
    #2 0x56332c8f401f in pmu_add_cpu_aliases_map util/pmu.c:778
    #3 0x56332c792ce9 in __test__pmu_event_aliases tests/pmu-events.c:295
    #4 0x56332c792ce9 in test_aliases tests/pmu-events.c:367
    #5 0x56332c76a09b in run_test tests/builtin-test.c:410
    #6 0x56332c76a09b in test_and_print tests/builtin-test.c:440
    #7 0x56332c76ce69 in __cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:695
    #8 0x56332c76ce69 in cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:807
    #9 0x56332c7d2214 in run_builtin /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:312
    #10 0x56332c6701a8 in handle_internal_command /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:364
    #11 0x56332c6701a8 in run_argv /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:408
    #12 0x56332c6701a8 in main /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:538
    #13 0x7feefb359cc9 in __libc_start_main ../csu/libc-start.c:308

Fixes: 956a783 ("perf test: Test pmu-events aliases")
Signed-off-by: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: John Garry <john.garry@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200915031819.386559-11-namhyung@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The evsel->unit borrows a pointer of pmu event or alias instead of
owns a string.  But tool event (duration_time) passes a result of
strdup() caused a leak.

It was found by ASAN during metric test:

  Direct leak of 210 byte(s) in 70 object(s) allocated from:
    #0 0x7fe366fca0b5 in strdup (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasan.so.5+0x920b5)
    #1 0x559fbbcc6ea3 in add_event_tool util/parse-events.c:414
    #2 0x559fbbcc6ea3 in parse_events_add_tool util/parse-events.c:1414
    #3 0x559fbbd8474d in parse_events_parse util/parse-events.y:439
    #4 0x559fbbcc95da in parse_events__scanner util/parse-events.c:2096
    #5 0x559fbbcc95da in __parse_events util/parse-events.c:2141
    #6 0x559fbbc28555 in check_parse_id tests/pmu-events.c:406
    #7 0x559fbbc28555 in check_parse_id tests/pmu-events.c:393
    #8 0x559fbbc28555 in check_parse_cpu tests/pmu-events.c:415
    #9 0x559fbbc28555 in test_parsing tests/pmu-events.c:498
    #10 0x559fbbc0109b in run_test tests/builtin-test.c:410
    #11 0x559fbbc0109b in test_and_print tests/builtin-test.c:440
    #12 0x559fbbc03e69 in __cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:695
    #13 0x559fbbc03e69 in cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:807
    #14 0x559fbbc691f4 in run_builtin /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:312
    #15 0x559fbbb071a8 in handle_internal_command /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:364
    #16 0x559fbbb071a8 in run_argv /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:408
    #17 0x559fbbb071a8 in main /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:538
    #18 0x7fe366b68cc9 in __libc_start_main ../csu/libc-start.c:308

Fixes: f0fbb11 ("perf stat: Implement duration_time as a proper event")
Signed-off-by: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200915031819.386559-6-namhyung@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The test_generic_metric() missed to release entries in the pctx.  Asan
reported following leak (and more):

  Direct leak of 128 byte(s) in 1 object(s) allocated from:
    #0 0x7f4c9396980e in calloc (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasan.so.5+0x10780e)
    #1 0x55f7e748cc14 in hashmap_grow (/home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf+0x90cc14)
    #2 0x55f7e748d497 in hashmap__insert (/home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf+0x90d497)
    #3 0x55f7e7341667 in hashmap__set /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/util/hashmap.h:111
    #4 0x55f7e7341667 in expr__add_ref util/expr.c:120
    #5 0x55f7e7292436 in prepare_metric util/stat-shadow.c:783
    #6 0x55f7e729556d in test_generic_metric util/stat-shadow.c:858
    #7 0x55f7e712390b in compute_single tests/parse-metric.c:128
    #8 0x55f7e712390b in __compute_metric tests/parse-metric.c:180
    #9 0x55f7e712446d in compute_metric tests/parse-metric.c:196
    #10 0x55f7e712446d in test_dcache_l2 tests/parse-metric.c:295
    #11 0x55f7e712446d in test__parse_metric tests/parse-metric.c:355
    #12 0x55f7e70be09b in run_test tests/builtin-test.c:410
    #13 0x55f7e70be09b in test_and_print tests/builtin-test.c:440
    #14 0x55f7e70c101a in __cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:661
    #15 0x55f7e70c101a in cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:807
    #16 0x55f7e7126214 in run_builtin /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:312
    #17 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in handle_internal_command /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:364
    #18 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in run_argv /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:408
    #19 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in main /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:538
    #20 0x7f4c93492cc9 in __libc_start_main ../csu/libc-start.c:308

Fixes: 6d432c4 ("perf tools: Add test_generic_metric function")
Signed-off-by: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200915031819.386559-8-namhyung@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The metricgroup__add_metric() can find multiple match for a metric group
and it's possible to fail.  Also it can fail in the middle like in
resolve_metric() even for single metric.

In those cases, the intermediate list and ids will be leaked like:

  Direct leak of 3 byte(s) in 1 object(s) allocated from:
    #0 0x7f4c938f40b5 in strdup (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasan.so.5+0x920b5)
    #1 0x55f7e71c1bef in __add_metric util/metricgroup.c:683
    #2 0x55f7e71c31d0 in add_metric util/metricgroup.c:906
    #3 0x55f7e71c3844 in metricgroup__add_metric util/metricgroup.c:940
    #4 0x55f7e71c488d in metricgroup__add_metric_list util/metricgroup.c:993
    #5 0x55f7e71c488d in parse_groups util/metricgroup.c:1045
    #6 0x55f7e71c60a4 in metricgroup__parse_groups_test util/metricgroup.c:1087
    #7 0x55f7e71235ae in __compute_metric tests/parse-metric.c:164
    #8 0x55f7e7124650 in compute_metric tests/parse-metric.c:196
    #9 0x55f7e7124650 in test_recursion_fail tests/parse-metric.c:318
    #10 0x55f7e7124650 in test__parse_metric tests/parse-metric.c:356
    #11 0x55f7e70be09b in run_test tests/builtin-test.c:410
    #12 0x55f7e70be09b in test_and_print tests/builtin-test.c:440
    #13 0x55f7e70c101a in __cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:661
    #14 0x55f7e70c101a in cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:807
    #15 0x55f7e7126214 in run_builtin /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:312
    #16 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in handle_internal_command /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:364
    #17 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in run_argv /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:408
    #18 0x55f7e6fc41a8 in main /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:538
    #19 0x7f4c93492cc9 in __libc_start_main ../csu/libc-start.c:308

Fixes: 83de0b7 ("perf metric: Collect referenced metrics in struct metric_ref_node")
Signed-off-by: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200915031819.386559-9-namhyung@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
The following leaks were detected by ASAN:

  Indirect leak of 360 byte(s) in 9 object(s) allocated from:
    #0 0x7fecc305180e in calloc (/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libasan.so.5+0x10780e)
    #1 0x560578f6dce5 in perf_pmu__new_format util/pmu.c:1333
    #2 0x560578f752fc in perf_pmu_parse util/pmu.y:59
    #3 0x560578f6a8b7 in perf_pmu__format_parse util/pmu.c:73
    #4 0x560578e07045 in test__pmu tests/pmu.c:155
    #5 0x560578de109b in run_test tests/builtin-test.c:410
    #6 0x560578de109b in test_and_print tests/builtin-test.c:440
    #7 0x560578de401a in __cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:661
    #8 0x560578de401a in cmd_test tests/builtin-test.c:807
    #9 0x560578e49354 in run_builtin /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:312
    #10 0x560578ce71a8 in handle_internal_command /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:364
    #11 0x560578ce71a8 in run_argv /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:408
    #12 0x560578ce71a8 in main /home/namhyung/project/linux/tools/perf/perf.c:538
    #13 0x7fecc2b7acc9 in __libc_start_main ../csu/libc-start.c:308

Fixes: cff7f95 ("perf tests: Move pmu tests into separate object")
Signed-off-by: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Jiri Olsa <jolsa@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Ian Rogers <irogers@google.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Stephane Eranian <eranian@google.com>
Link: http://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200915031819.386559-12-namhyung@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
…kernel/git/kvmarm/kvmarm into kvm-master

KVM/arm64 fixes for 5.9, take #2

- Fix handling of S1 Page Table Walk permission fault at S2
  on instruction fetch
- Cleanup kvm_vcpu_dabt_iswrite()
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
syzbot reports a potential lock deadlock between the normal IO path and
->show_fdinfo():

======================================================
WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
5.9.0-rc6-syzkaller #0 Not tainted
------------------------------------------------------
syz-executor.2/19710 is trying to acquire lock:
ffff888098ddc450 (sb_writers#4){.+.+}-{0:0}, at: io_write+0x6b5/0xb30 fs/io_uring.c:3296

but task is already holding lock:
ffff8880a11b8428 (&ctx->uring_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: __do_sys_io_uring_enter+0xe9a/0x1bd0 fs/io_uring.c:8348

which lock already depends on the new lock.

the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

-> #2 (&ctx->uring_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}:
       __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
       __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
       __io_uring_show_fdinfo fs/io_uring.c:8417 [inline]
       io_uring_show_fdinfo+0x194/0xc70 fs/io_uring.c:8460
       seq_show+0x4a8/0x700 fs/proc/fd.c:65
       seq_read+0x432/0x1070 fs/seq_file.c:208
       do_loop_readv_writev fs/read_write.c:734 [inline]
       do_loop_readv_writev fs/read_write.c:721 [inline]
       do_iter_read+0x48e/0x6e0 fs/read_write.c:955
       vfs_readv+0xe5/0x150 fs/read_write.c:1073
       kernel_readv fs/splice.c:355 [inline]
       default_file_splice_read.constprop.0+0x4e6/0x9e0 fs/splice.c:412
       do_splice_to+0x137/0x170 fs/splice.c:871
       splice_direct_to_actor+0x307/0x980 fs/splice.c:950
       do_splice_direct+0x1b3/0x280 fs/splice.c:1059
       do_sendfile+0x55f/0xd40 fs/read_write.c:1540
       __do_sys_sendfile64 fs/read_write.c:1601 [inline]
       __se_sys_sendfile64 fs/read_write.c:1587 [inline]
       __x64_sys_sendfile64+0x1cc/0x210 fs/read_write.c:1587
       do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
       entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

-> #1 (&p->lock){+.+.}-{3:3}:
       __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
       __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
       seq_read+0x61/0x1070 fs/seq_file.c:155
       pde_read fs/proc/inode.c:306 [inline]
       proc_reg_read+0x221/0x300 fs/proc/inode.c:318
       do_loop_readv_writev fs/read_write.c:734 [inline]
       do_loop_readv_writev fs/read_write.c:721 [inline]
       do_iter_read+0x48e/0x6e0 fs/read_write.c:955
       vfs_readv+0xe5/0x150 fs/read_write.c:1073
       kernel_readv fs/splice.c:355 [inline]
       default_file_splice_read.constprop.0+0x4e6/0x9e0 fs/splice.c:412
       do_splice_to+0x137/0x170 fs/splice.c:871
       splice_direct_to_actor+0x307/0x980 fs/splice.c:950
       do_splice_direct+0x1b3/0x280 fs/splice.c:1059
       do_sendfile+0x55f/0xd40 fs/read_write.c:1540
       __do_sys_sendfile64 fs/read_write.c:1601 [inline]
       __se_sys_sendfile64 fs/read_write.c:1587 [inline]
       __x64_sys_sendfile64+0x1cc/0x210 fs/read_write.c:1587
       do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
       entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

-> #0 (sb_writers#4){.+.+}-{0:0}:
       check_prev_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2496 [inline]
       check_prevs_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2601 [inline]
       validate_chain kernel/locking/lockdep.c:3218 [inline]
       __lock_acquire+0x2a96/0x5780 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:4441
       lock_acquire+0x1f3/0xaf0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:5029
       percpu_down_read include/linux/percpu-rwsem.h:51 [inline]
       __sb_start_write+0x228/0x450 fs/super.c:1672
       io_write+0x6b5/0xb30 fs/io_uring.c:3296
       io_issue_sqe+0x18f/0x5c50 fs/io_uring.c:5719
       __io_queue_sqe+0x280/0x1160 fs/io_uring.c:6175
       io_queue_sqe+0x692/0xfa0 fs/io_uring.c:6254
       io_submit_sqe fs/io_uring.c:6324 [inline]
       io_submit_sqes+0x1761/0x2400 fs/io_uring.c:6521
       __do_sys_io_uring_enter+0xeac/0x1bd0 fs/io_uring.c:8349
       do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
       entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

other info that might help us debug this:

Chain exists of:
  sb_writers#4 --> &p->lock --> &ctx->uring_lock

 Possible unsafe locking scenario:

       CPU0                    CPU1
       ----                    ----
  lock(&ctx->uring_lock);
                               lock(&p->lock);
                               lock(&ctx->uring_lock);
  lock(sb_writers#4);

 *** DEADLOCK ***

1 lock held by syz-executor.2/19710:
 #0: ffff8880a11b8428 (&ctx->uring_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: __do_sys_io_uring_enter+0xe9a/0x1bd0 fs/io_uring.c:8348

stack backtrace:
CPU: 0 PID: 19710 Comm: syz-executor.2 Not tainted 5.9.0-rc6-syzkaller #0
Hardware name: Google Google Compute Engine/Google Compute Engine, BIOS Google 01/01/2011
Call Trace:
 __dump_stack lib/dump_stack.c:77 [inline]
 dump_stack+0x198/0x1fd lib/dump_stack.c:118
 check_noncircular+0x324/0x3e0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:1827
 check_prev_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2496 [inline]
 check_prevs_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2601 [inline]
 validate_chain kernel/locking/lockdep.c:3218 [inline]
 __lock_acquire+0x2a96/0x5780 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:4441
 lock_acquire+0x1f3/0xaf0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:5029
 percpu_down_read include/linux/percpu-rwsem.h:51 [inline]
 __sb_start_write+0x228/0x450 fs/super.c:1672
 io_write+0x6b5/0xb30 fs/io_uring.c:3296
 io_issue_sqe+0x18f/0x5c50 fs/io_uring.c:5719
 __io_queue_sqe+0x280/0x1160 fs/io_uring.c:6175
 io_queue_sqe+0x692/0xfa0 fs/io_uring.c:6254
 io_submit_sqe fs/io_uring.c:6324 [inline]
 io_submit_sqes+0x1761/0x2400 fs/io_uring.c:6521
 __do_sys_io_uring_enter+0xeac/0x1bd0 fs/io_uring.c:8349
 do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
RIP: 0033:0x45e179
Code: 3d b2 fb ff c3 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 66 90 48 89 f8 48 89 f7 48 89 d6 48 89 ca 4d 89 c2 4d 89 c8 4c 8b 4c 24 08 0f 05 <48> 3d 01 f0 ff ff 0f 83 0b b2 fb ff c3 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00
RSP: 002b:00007f1194e74c78 EFLAGS: 00000246 ORIG_RAX: 00000000000001aa
RAX: ffffffffffffffda RBX: 00000000000082c0 RCX: 000000000045e179
RDX: 0000000000000000 RSI: 0000000000000001 RDI: 0000000000000004
RBP: 000000000118cf98 R08: 0000000000000000 R09: 0000000000000000
R10: 0000000000000000 R11: 0000000000000246 R12: 000000000118cf4c
R13: 00007ffd1aa5756f R14: 00007f1194e759c0 R15: 000000000118cf4c

Fix this by just not diving into details if we fail to trylock the
io_uring mutex. We know the ctx isn't going away during this operation,
but we cannot safely iterate buffers/files/personalities if we don't
hold the io_uring mutex.

Reported-by: syzbot+2f8fa4e860edc3066aba@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
This patch is to add a new variable 'nested_level' into the net_device
structure.
This variable will be used as a parameter of spin_lock_nested() of
dev->addr_list_lock.

netif_addr_lock() can be called recursively so spin_lock_nested() is
used instead of spin_lock() and dev->lower_level is used as a parameter
of spin_lock_nested().
But, dev->lower_level value can be updated while it is being used.
So, lockdep would warn a possible deadlock scenario.

When a stacked interface is deleted, netif_{uc | mc}_sync() is
called recursively.
So, spin_lock_nested() is called recursively too.
At this moment, the dev->lower_level variable is used as a parameter of it.
dev->lower_level value is updated when interfaces are being unlinked/linked
immediately.
Thus, After unlinking, dev->lower_level shouldn't be a parameter of
spin_lock_nested().

    A (macvlan)
    |
    B (vlan)
    |
    C (bridge)
    |
    D (macvlan)
    |
    E (vlan)
    |
    F (bridge)

    A->lower_level : 6
    B->lower_level : 5
    C->lower_level : 4
    D->lower_level : 3
    E->lower_level : 2
    F->lower_level : 1

When an interface 'A' is removed, it releases resources.
At this moment, netif_addr_lock() would be called.
Then, netdev_upper_dev_unlink() is called recursively.
Then dev->lower_level is updated.
There is no problem.

But, when the bridge module is removed, 'C' and 'F' interfaces
are removed at once.
If 'F' is removed first, a lower_level value is like below.
    A->lower_level : 5
    B->lower_level : 4
    C->lower_level : 3
    D->lower_level : 2
    E->lower_level : 1
    F->lower_level : 1

Then, 'C' is removed. at this moment, netif_addr_lock() is called
recursively.
The ordering is like this.
C(3)->D(2)->E(1)->F(1)
At this moment, the lower_level value of 'E' and 'F' are the same.
So, lockdep warns a possible deadlock scenario.

In order to avoid this problem, a new variable 'nested_level' is added.
This value is the same as dev->lower_level - 1.
But this value is updated in rtnl_unlock().
So, this variable can be used as a parameter of spin_lock_nested() safely
in the rtnl context.

Test commands:
   ip link add br0 type bridge vlan_filtering 1
   ip link add vlan1 link br0 type vlan id 10
   ip link add macvlan2 link vlan1 type macvlan
   ip link add br3 type bridge vlan_filtering 1
   ip link set macvlan2 master br3
   ip link add vlan4 link br3 type vlan id 10
   ip link add macvlan5 link vlan4 type macvlan
   ip link add br6 type bridge vlan_filtering 1
   ip link set macvlan5 master br6
   ip link add vlan7 link br6 type vlan id 10
   ip link add macvlan8 link vlan7 type macvlan

   ip link set br0 up
   ip link set vlan1 up
   ip link set macvlan2 up
   ip link set br3 up
   ip link set vlan4 up
   ip link set macvlan5 up
   ip link set br6 up
   ip link set vlan7 up
   ip link set macvlan8 up
   modprobe -rv bridge

Splat looks like:
[   36.057436][  T744] WARNING: possible recursive locking detected
[   36.058848][  T744] 5.9.0-rc6+ #728 Not tainted
[   36.059959][  T744] --------------------------------------------
[   36.061391][  T744] ip/744 is trying to acquire lock:
[   36.062590][  T744] ffff8c4767509280 (&vlan_netdev_addr_lock_key){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_set_rx_mode+0x19/0x30
[   36.064922][  T744]
[   36.064922][  T744] but task is already holding lock:
[   36.066626][  T744] ffff8c4767769280 (&vlan_netdev_addr_lock_key){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_uc_add+0x1e/0x60
[   36.068851][  T744]
[   36.068851][  T744] other info that might help us debug this:
[   36.070731][  T744]  Possible unsafe locking scenario:
[   36.070731][  T744]
[   36.072497][  T744]        CPU0
[   36.073238][  T744]        ----
[   36.074007][  T744]   lock(&vlan_netdev_addr_lock_key);
[   36.075290][  T744]   lock(&vlan_netdev_addr_lock_key);
[   36.076590][  T744]
[   36.076590][  T744]  *** DEADLOCK ***
[   36.076590][  T744]
[   36.078515][  T744]  May be due to missing lock nesting notation
[   36.078515][  T744]
[   36.080491][  T744] 3 locks held by ip/744:
[   36.081471][  T744]  #0: ffffffff98571df0 (rtnl_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: rtnetlink_rcv_msg+0x236/0x490
[   36.083614][  T744]  #1: ffff8c4767769280 (&vlan_netdev_addr_lock_key){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_uc_add+0x1e/0x60
[   36.085942][  T744]  #2: ffff8c476c8da280 (&bridge_netdev_addr_lock_key/4){+...}-{2:2}, at: dev_uc_sync+0x39/0x80
[   36.088400][  T744]
[   36.088400][  T744] stack backtrace:
[   36.089772][  T744] CPU: 6 PID: 744 Comm: ip Not tainted 5.9.0-rc6+ #728
[   36.091364][  T744] Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS 1.10.2-1ubuntu1 04/01/2014
[   36.093630][  T744] Call Trace:
[   36.094416][  T744]  dump_stack+0x77/0x9b
[   36.095385][  T744]  __lock_acquire+0xbc3/0x1f40
[   36.096522][  T744]  lock_acquire+0xb4/0x3b0
[   36.097540][  T744]  ? dev_set_rx_mode+0x19/0x30
[   36.098657][  T744]  ? rtmsg_ifinfo+0x1f/0x30
[   36.099711][  T744]  ? __dev_notify_flags+0xa5/0xf0
[   36.100874][  T744]  ? rtnl_is_locked+0x11/0x20
[   36.101967][  T744]  ? __dev_set_promiscuity+0x7b/0x1a0
[   36.103230][  T744]  _raw_spin_lock_bh+0x38/0x70
[   36.104348][  T744]  ? dev_set_rx_mode+0x19/0x30
[   36.105461][  T744]  dev_set_rx_mode+0x19/0x30
[   36.106532][  T744]  dev_set_promiscuity+0x36/0x50
[   36.107692][  T744]  __dev_set_promiscuity+0x123/0x1a0
[   36.108929][  T744]  dev_set_promiscuity+0x1e/0x50
[   36.110093][  T744]  br_port_set_promisc+0x1f/0x40 [bridge]
[   36.111415][  T744]  br_manage_promisc+0x8b/0xe0 [bridge]
[   36.112728][  T744]  __dev_set_promiscuity+0x123/0x1a0
[   36.113967][  T744]  ? __hw_addr_sync_one+0x23/0x50
[   36.115135][  T744]  __dev_set_rx_mode+0x68/0x90
[   36.116249][  T744]  dev_uc_sync+0x70/0x80
[   36.117244][  T744]  dev_uc_add+0x50/0x60
[   36.118223][  T744]  macvlan_open+0x18e/0x1f0 [macvlan]
[   36.119470][  T744]  __dev_open+0xd6/0x170
[   36.120470][  T744]  __dev_change_flags+0x181/0x1d0
[   36.121644][  T744]  dev_change_flags+0x23/0x60
[   36.122741][  T744]  do_setlink+0x30a/0x11e0
[   36.123778][  T744]  ? __lock_acquire+0x92c/0x1f40
[   36.124929][  T744]  ? __nla_validate_parse.part.6+0x45/0x8e0
[   36.126309][  T744]  ? __lock_acquire+0x92c/0x1f40
[   36.127457][  T744]  __rtnl_newlink+0x546/0x8e0
[   36.128560][  T744]  ? lock_acquire+0xb4/0x3b0
[   36.129623][  T744]  ? deactivate_slab.isra.85+0x6a1/0x850
[   36.130946][  T744]  ? __lock_acquire+0x92c/0x1f40
[   36.132102][  T744]  ? lock_acquire+0xb4/0x3b0
[   36.133176][  T744]  ? is_bpf_text_address+0x5/0xe0
[   36.134364][  T744]  ? rtnl_newlink+0x2e/0x70
[   36.135445][  T744]  ? rcu_read_lock_sched_held+0x32/0x60
[   36.136771][  T744]  ? kmem_cache_alloc_trace+0x2d8/0x380
[   36.138070][  T744]  ? rtnl_newlink+0x2e/0x70
[   36.139164][  T744]  rtnl_newlink+0x47/0x70
[ ... ]

Fixes: 845e0eb ("net: change addr_list_lock back to static key")
Signed-off-by: Taehee Yoo <ap420073@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Nov 28, 2020
When closing and freeing the source device we could end up doing our
final blkdev_put() on the bdev, which will grab the bd_mutex.  As such
we want to be holding as few locks as possible, so move this call
outside of the dev_replace->lock_finishing_cancel_unmount lock.  Since
we're modifying the fs_devices we need to make sure we're holding the
uuid_mutex here, so take that as well.

There's a report from syzbot probably hitting one of the cases where
the bd_mutex and device_list_mutex are taken in the wrong order, however
it's not with device replace, like this patch fixes. As there's no
reproducer available so far, we can't verify the fix.

https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/000000000000fc04d105afcf86d7@google.com/
dashboard link: https://syzkaller.appspot.com/bug?extid=84a0634dc5d21d488419

  WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
  5.9.0-rc5-syzkaller #0 Not tainted
  ------------------------------------------------------
  syz-executor.0/6878 is trying to acquire lock:
  ffff88804c17d780 (&bdev->bd_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: blkdev_put+0x30/0x520 fs/block_dev.c:1804

  but task is already holding lock:
  ffff8880908cfce0 (&fs_devs->device_list_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: close_fs_devices.part.0+0x2e/0x800 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1159

  which lock already depends on the new lock.

  the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

  -> #4 (&fs_devs->device_list_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
	 __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
	 btrfs_finish_chunk_alloc+0x281/0xf90 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:5255
	 btrfs_create_pending_block_groups+0x2f3/0x700 fs/btrfs/block-group.c:2109
	 __btrfs_end_transaction+0xf5/0x690 fs/btrfs/transaction.c:916
	 find_free_extent_update_loop fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:3807 [inline]
	 find_free_extent+0x23b7/0x2e60 fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:4127
	 btrfs_reserve_extent+0x166/0x460 fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:4206
	 cow_file_range+0x3de/0x9b0 fs/btrfs/inode.c:1063
	 btrfs_run_delalloc_range+0x2cf/0x1410 fs/btrfs/inode.c:1838
	 writepage_delalloc+0x150/0x460 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:3439
	 __extent_writepage+0x441/0xd00 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:3653
	 extent_write_cache_pages.constprop.0+0x69d/0x1040 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:4249
	 extent_writepages+0xcd/0x2b0 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:4370
	 do_writepages+0xec/0x290 mm/page-writeback.c:2352
	 __writeback_single_inode+0x125/0x1400 fs/fs-writeback.c:1461
	 writeback_sb_inodes+0x53d/0xf40 fs/fs-writeback.c:1721
	 wb_writeback+0x2ad/0xd40 fs/fs-writeback.c:1894
	 wb_do_writeback fs/fs-writeback.c:2039 [inline]
	 wb_workfn+0x2dc/0x13e0 fs/fs-writeback.c:2080
	 process_one_work+0x94c/0x1670 kernel/workqueue.c:2269
	 worker_thread+0x64c/0x1120 kernel/workqueue.c:2415
	 kthread+0x3b5/0x4a0 kernel/kthread.c:292
	 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30 arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S:294

  -> #3 (sb_internal#2){.+.+}-{0:0}:
	 percpu_down_read include/linux/percpu-rwsem.h:51 [inline]
	 __sb_start_write+0x234/0x470 fs/super.c:1672
	 sb_start_intwrite include/linux/fs.h:1690 [inline]
	 start_transaction+0xbe7/0x1170 fs/btrfs/transaction.c:624
	 find_free_extent_update_loop fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:3789 [inline]
	 find_free_extent+0x25e1/0x2e60 fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:4127
	 btrfs_reserve_extent+0x166/0x460 fs/btrfs/extent-tree.c:4206
	 cow_file_range+0x3de/0x9b0 fs/btrfs/inode.c:1063
	 btrfs_run_delalloc_range+0x2cf/0x1410 fs/btrfs/inode.c:1838
	 writepage_delalloc+0x150/0x460 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:3439
	 __extent_writepage+0x441/0xd00 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:3653
	 extent_write_cache_pages.constprop.0+0x69d/0x1040 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:4249
	 extent_writepages+0xcd/0x2b0 fs/btrfs/extent_io.c:4370
	 do_writepages+0xec/0x290 mm/page-writeback.c:2352
	 __writeback_single_inode+0x125/0x1400 fs/fs-writeback.c:1461
	 writeback_sb_inodes+0x53d/0xf40 fs/fs-writeback.c:1721
	 wb_writeback+0x2ad/0xd40 fs/fs-writeback.c:1894
	 wb_do_writeback fs/fs-writeback.c:2039 [inline]
	 wb_workfn+0x2dc/0x13e0 fs/fs-writeback.c:2080
	 process_one_work+0x94c/0x1670 kernel/workqueue.c:2269
	 worker_thread+0x64c/0x1120 kernel/workqueue.c:2415
	 kthread+0x3b5/0x4a0 kernel/kthread.c:292
	 ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30 arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S:294

  -> #2 ((work_completion)(&(&wb->dwork)->work)){+.+.}-{0:0}:
	 __flush_work+0x60e/0xac0 kernel/workqueue.c:3041
	 wb_shutdown+0x180/0x220 mm/backing-dev.c:355
	 bdi_unregister+0x174/0x590 mm/backing-dev.c:872
	 del_gendisk+0x820/0xa10 block/genhd.c:933
	 loop_remove drivers/block/loop.c:2192 [inline]
	 loop_control_ioctl drivers/block/loop.c:2291 [inline]
	 loop_control_ioctl+0x3b1/0x480 drivers/block/loop.c:2257
	 vfs_ioctl fs/ioctl.c:48 [inline]
	 __do_sys_ioctl fs/ioctl.c:753 [inline]
	 __se_sys_ioctl fs/ioctl.c:739 [inline]
	 __x64_sys_ioctl+0x193/0x200 fs/ioctl.c:739
	 do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #1 (loop_ctl_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
	 __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
	 lo_open+0x19/0xd0 drivers/block/loop.c:1893
	 __blkdev_get+0x759/0x1aa0 fs/block_dev.c:1507
	 blkdev_get fs/block_dev.c:1639 [inline]
	 blkdev_open+0x227/0x300 fs/block_dev.c:1753
	 do_dentry_open+0x4b9/0x11b0 fs/open.c:817
	 do_open fs/namei.c:3251 [inline]
	 path_openat+0x1b9a/0x2730 fs/namei.c:3368
	 do_filp_open+0x17e/0x3c0 fs/namei.c:3395
	 do_sys_openat2+0x16d/0x420 fs/open.c:1168
	 do_sys_open fs/open.c:1184 [inline]
	 __do_sys_open fs/open.c:1192 [inline]
	 __se_sys_open fs/open.c:1188 [inline]
	 __x64_sys_open+0x119/0x1c0 fs/open.c:1188
	 do_syscall_64+0x2d/0x70 arch/x86/entry/common.c:46
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  -> #0 (&bdev->bd_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}:
	 check_prev_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2496 [inline]
	 check_prevs_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2601 [inline]
	 validate_chain kernel/locking/lockdep.c:3218 [inline]
	 __lock_acquire+0x2a96/0x5780 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:4426
	 lock_acquire+0x1f3/0xae0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:5006
	 __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
	 __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
	 blkdev_put+0x30/0x520 fs/block_dev.c:1804
	 btrfs_close_bdev fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1117 [inline]
	 btrfs_close_bdev fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1107 [inline]
	 btrfs_close_one_device fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1133 [inline]
	 close_fs_devices.part.0+0x1a4/0x800 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1161
	 close_fs_devices fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1193 [inline]
	 btrfs_close_devices+0x95/0x1f0 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1179
	 close_ctree+0x688/0x6cb fs/btrfs/disk-io.c:4149
	 generic_shutdown_super+0x144/0x370 fs/super.c:464
	 kill_anon_super+0x36/0x60 fs/super.c:1108
	 btrfs_kill_super+0x38/0x50 fs/btrfs/super.c:2265
	 deactivate_locked_super+0x94/0x160 fs/super.c:335
	 deactivate_super+0xad/0xd0 fs/super.c:366
	 cleanup_mnt+0x3a3/0x530 fs/namespace.c:1118
	 task_work_run+0xdd/0x190 kernel/task_work.c:141
	 tracehook_notify_resume include/linux/tracehook.h:188 [inline]
	 exit_to_user_mode_loop kernel/entry/common.c:163 [inline]
	 exit_to_user_mode_prepare+0x1e1/0x200 kernel/entry/common.c:190
	 syscall_exit_to_user_mode+0x7e/0x2e0 kernel/entry/common.c:265
	 entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9

  other info that might help us debug this:

  Chain exists of:
    &bdev->bd_mutex --> sb_internal#2 --> &fs_devs->device_list_mutex

   Possible unsafe locking scenario:

	 CPU0                    CPU1
	 ----                    ----
    lock(&fs_devs->device_list_mutex);
				 lock(sb_internal#2);
				 lock(&fs_devs->device_list_mutex);
    lock(&bdev->bd_mutex);

   *** DEADLOCK ***

  3 locks held by syz-executor.0/6878:
   #0: ffff88809070c0e0 (&type->s_umount_key#70){++++}-{3:3}, at: deactivate_super+0xa5/0xd0 fs/super.c:365
   #1: ffffffff8a5b37a8 (uuid_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_close_devices+0x23/0x1f0 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1178
   #2: ffff8880908cfce0 (&fs_devs->device_list_mutex){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: close_fs_devices.part.0+0x2e/0x800 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1159

  stack backtrace:
  CPU: 0 PID: 6878 Comm: syz-executor.0 Not tainted 5.9.0-rc5-syzkaller #0
  Hardware name: Google Google Compute Engine/Google Compute Engine, BIOS Google 01/01/2011
  Call Trace:
   __dump_stack lib/dump_stack.c:77 [inline]
   dump_stack+0x198/0x1fd lib/dump_stack.c:118
   check_noncircular+0x324/0x3e0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:1827
   check_prev_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2496 [inline]
   check_prevs_add kernel/locking/lockdep.c:2601 [inline]
   validate_chain kernel/locking/lockdep.c:3218 [inline]
   __lock_acquire+0x2a96/0x5780 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:4426
   lock_acquire+0x1f3/0xae0 kernel/locking/lockdep.c:5006
   __mutex_lock_common kernel/locking/mutex.c:956 [inline]
   __mutex_lock+0x134/0x10e0 kernel/locking/mutex.c:1103
   blkdev_put+0x30/0x520 fs/block_dev.c:1804
   btrfs_close_bdev fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1117 [inline]
   btrfs_close_bdev fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1107 [inline]
   btrfs_close_one_device fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1133 [inline]
   close_fs_devices.part.0+0x1a4/0x800 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1161
   close_fs_devices fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1193 [inline]
   btrfs_close_devices+0x95/0x1f0 fs/btrfs/volumes.c:1179
   close_ctree+0x688/0x6cb fs/btrfs/disk-io.c:4149
   generic_shutdown_super+0x144/0x370 fs/super.c:464
   kill_anon_super+0x36/0x60 fs/super.c:1108
   btrfs_kill_super+0x38/0x50 fs/btrfs/super.c:2265
   deactivate_locked_super+0x94/0x160 fs/super.c:335
   deactivate_super+0xad/0xd0 fs/super.c:366
   cleanup_mnt+0x3a3/0x530 fs/namespace.c:1118
   task_work_run+0xdd/0x190 kernel/task_work.c:141
   tracehook_notify_resume include/linux/tracehook.h:188 [inline]
   exit_to_user_mode_loop kernel/entry/common.c:163 [inline]
   exit_to_user_mode_prepare+0x1e1/0x200 kernel/entry/common.c:190
   syscall_exit_to_user_mode+0x7e/0x2e0 kernel/entry/common.c:265
   entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
  RIP: 0033:0x460027
  RSP: 002b:00007fff59216328 EFLAGS: 00000246 ORIG_RAX: 00000000000000a6
  RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: 0000000000076035 RCX: 0000000000460027
  RDX: 0000000000403188 RSI: 0000000000000002 RDI: 00007fff592163d0
  RBP: 0000000000000333 R08: 0000000000000000 R09: 000000000000000b
  R10: 0000000000000005 R11: 0000000000000246 R12: 00007fff59217460
  R13: 0000000002df2a60 R14: 0000000000000000 R15: 00007fff59217460

Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
[ add syzbot reference ]
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
@ojeda ojeda removed this from the Rust features milestone Nov 28, 2020
@ojeda ojeda added the required label Nov 28, 2020
@ojeda ojeda unpinned this issue Nov 28, 2020
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 16, 2020
Ido Schimmel says:

====================
mlxsw: Couple of fixes

Patch #1 fixes firmware flashing when CONFIG_MLXSW_CORE=y and
CONFIG_MLXFW=m.

Patch #2 prevents EMAD transactions from needlessly failing when the
system is under heavy load by using exponential backoff.

Please consider patch #2 for stable.
====================

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20201117173352.288491-1-idosch@idosch.org
Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 16, 2020
When running test case btrfs/017 from fstests, lockdep reported the
following splat:

  [ 1297.067385] ======================================================
  [ 1297.067708] WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
  [ 1297.068022] 5.10.0-rc4-btrfs-next-73 #1 Not tainted
  [ 1297.068322] ------------------------------------------------------
  [ 1297.068629] btrfs/189080 is trying to acquire lock:
  [ 1297.068929] ffff9f2725731690 (sb_internal#2){.+.+}-{0:0}, at: btrfs_quota_enable+0xaf/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.069274]
		 but task is already holding lock:
  [ 1297.069868] ffff9f2702b61a08 (&fs_info->qgroup_ioctl_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_quota_enable+0x3b/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.070219]
		 which lock already depends on the new lock.

  [ 1297.071131]
		 the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:
  [ 1297.071721]
		 -> #1 (&fs_info->qgroup_ioctl_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}:
  [ 1297.072375]        lock_acquire+0xd8/0x490
  [ 1297.072710]        __mutex_lock+0xa3/0xb30
  [ 1297.073061]        btrfs_qgroup_inherit+0x59/0x6a0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.073421]        create_subvol+0x194/0x990 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.073780]        btrfs_mksubvol+0x3fb/0x4a0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.074133]        __btrfs_ioctl_snap_create+0x119/0x1a0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.074498]        btrfs_ioctl_snap_create+0x58/0x80 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.074872]        btrfs_ioctl+0x1a90/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.075245]        __x64_sys_ioctl+0x83/0xb0
  [ 1297.075617]        do_syscall_64+0x33/0x80
  [ 1297.075993]        entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
  [ 1297.076380]
		 -> #0 (sb_internal#2){.+.+}-{0:0}:
  [ 1297.077166]        check_prev_add+0x91/0xc60
  [ 1297.077572]        __lock_acquire+0x1740/0x3110
  [ 1297.077984]        lock_acquire+0xd8/0x490
  [ 1297.078411]        start_transaction+0x3c5/0x760 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.078853]        btrfs_quota_enable+0xaf/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.079323]        btrfs_ioctl+0x2c60/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.079789]        __x64_sys_ioctl+0x83/0xb0
  [ 1297.080232]        do_syscall_64+0x33/0x80
  [ 1297.080680]        entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
  [ 1297.081139]
		 other info that might help us debug this:

  [ 1297.082536]  Possible unsafe locking scenario:

  [ 1297.083510]        CPU0                    CPU1
  [ 1297.084005]        ----                    ----
  [ 1297.084500]   lock(&fs_info->qgroup_ioctl_lock);
  [ 1297.084994]                                lock(sb_internal#2);
  [ 1297.085485]                                lock(&fs_info->qgroup_ioctl_lock);
  [ 1297.085974]   lock(sb_internal#2);
  [ 1297.086454]
		  *** DEADLOCK ***
  [ 1297.087880] 3 locks held by btrfs/189080:
  [ 1297.088324]  #0: ffff9f2725731470 (sb_writers#14){.+.+}-{0:0}, at: btrfs_ioctl+0xa73/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.088799]  #1: ffff9f2702b60cc0 (&fs_info->subvol_sem){++++}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_ioctl+0x1f4d/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.089284]  #2: ffff9f2702b61a08 (&fs_info->qgroup_ioctl_lock){+.+.}-{3:3}, at: btrfs_quota_enable+0x3b/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.089771]
		 stack backtrace:
  [ 1297.090662] CPU: 5 PID: 189080 Comm: btrfs Not tainted 5.10.0-rc4-btrfs-next-73 #1
  [ 1297.091132] Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS rel-1.13.0-0-gf21b5a4aeb02-prebuilt.qemu.org 04/01/2014
  [ 1297.092123] Call Trace:
  [ 1297.092629]  dump_stack+0x8d/0xb5
  [ 1297.093115]  check_noncircular+0xff/0x110
  [ 1297.093596]  check_prev_add+0x91/0xc60
  [ 1297.094076]  ? kvm_clock_read+0x14/0x30
  [ 1297.094553]  ? kvm_sched_clock_read+0x5/0x10
  [ 1297.095029]  __lock_acquire+0x1740/0x3110
  [ 1297.095510]  lock_acquire+0xd8/0x490
  [ 1297.095993]  ? btrfs_quota_enable+0xaf/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.096476]  start_transaction+0x3c5/0x760 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.096962]  ? btrfs_quota_enable+0xaf/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.097451]  btrfs_quota_enable+0xaf/0xa70 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.097941]  ? btrfs_ioctl+0x1f4d/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.098429]  btrfs_ioctl+0x2c60/0x36f0 [btrfs]
  [ 1297.098904]  ? do_user_addr_fault+0x20c/0x430
  [ 1297.099382]  ? kvm_clock_read+0x14/0x30
  [ 1297.099854]  ? kvm_sched_clock_read+0x5/0x10
  [ 1297.100328]  ? sched_clock+0x5/0x10
  [ 1297.100801]  ? sched_clock_cpu+0x12/0x180
  [ 1297.101272]  ? __x64_sys_ioctl+0x83/0xb0
  [ 1297.101739]  __x64_sys_ioctl+0x83/0xb0
  [ 1297.102207]  do_syscall_64+0x33/0x80
  [ 1297.102673]  entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xa9
  [ 1297.103148] RIP: 0033:0x7f773ff65d87

This is because during the quota enable ioctl we lock first the mutex
qgroup_ioctl_lock and then start a transaction, and starting a transaction
acquires a fs freeze semaphore (at the VFS level). However, every other
code path, except for the quota disable ioctl path, we do the opposite:
we start a transaction and then lock the mutex.

So fix this by making the quota enable and disable paths to start the
transaction without having the mutex locked, and then, after starting the
transaction, lock the mutex and check if some other task already enabled
or disabled the quotas, bailing with success if that was the case.

Signed-off-by: Filipe Manana <fdmanana@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
metaspace pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 7, 2024
Running the following two commands in parallel on a multi-processor
AArch64 machine can sporadically produce an unexpected warning about
duplicate histogram entries:

 $ while true; do
     echo hist:key=id.syscall:val=hitcount > \
       /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/raw_syscalls/sys_enter/trigger
     cat /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/raw_syscalls/sys_enter/hist
     sleep 0.001
   done
 $ stress-ng --sysbadaddr $(nproc)

The warning looks as follows:

[ 2911.172474] ------------[ cut here ]------------
[ 2911.173111] Duplicates detected: 1
[ 2911.173574] WARNING: CPU: 2 PID: 12247 at kernel/trace/tracing_map.c:983 tracing_map_sort_entries+0x3e0/0x408
[ 2911.174702] Modules linked in: iscsi_ibft(E) iscsi_boot_sysfs(E) rfkill(E) af_packet(E) nls_iso8859_1(E) nls_cp437(E) vfat(E) fat(E) ena(E) tiny_power_button(E) qemu_fw_cfg(E) button(E) fuse(E) efi_pstore(E) ip_tables(E) x_tables(E) xfs(E) libcrc32c(E) aes_ce_blk(E) aes_ce_cipher(E) crct10dif_ce(E) polyval_ce(E) polyval_generic(E) ghash_ce(E) gf128mul(E) sm4_ce_gcm(E) sm4_ce_ccm(E) sm4_ce(E) sm4_ce_cipher(E) sm4(E) sm3_ce(E) sm3(E) sha3_ce(E) sha512_ce(E) sha512_arm64(E) sha2_ce(E) sha256_arm64(E) nvme(E) sha1_ce(E) nvme_core(E) nvme_auth(E) t10_pi(E) sg(E) scsi_mod(E) scsi_common(E) efivarfs(E)
[ 2911.174738] Unloaded tainted modules: cppc_cpufreq(E):1
[ 2911.180985] CPU: 2 PID: 12247 Comm: cat Kdump: loaded Tainted: G            E      6.7.0-default #2 1b58bbb22c97e4399dc09f92d309344f69c44a01
[ 2911.182398] Hardware name: Amazon EC2 c7g.8xlarge/, BIOS 1.0 11/1/2018
[ 2911.183208] pstate: 61400005 (nZCv daif +PAN -UAO -TCO +DIT -SSBS BTYPE=--)
[ 2911.184038] pc : tracing_map_sort_entries+0x3e0/0x408
[ 2911.184667] lr : tracing_map_sort_entries+0x3e0/0x408
[ 2911.185310] sp : ffff8000a1513900
[ 2911.185750] x29: ffff8000a1513900 x28: ffff0003f272fe80 x27: 0000000000000001
[ 2911.186600] x26: ffff0003f272fe80 x25: 0000000000000030 x24: 0000000000000008
[ 2911.187458] x23: ffff0003c5788000 x22: ffff0003c16710c8 x21: ffff80008017f180
[ 2911.188310] x20: ffff80008017f000 x19: ffff80008017f180 x18: ffffffffffffffff
[ 2911.189160] x17: 0000000000000000 x16: 0000000000000000 x15: ffff8000a15134b8
[ 2911.190015] x14: 0000000000000000 x13: 205d373432323154 x12: 5b5d313131333731
[ 2911.190844] x11: 00000000fffeffff x10: 00000000fffeffff x9 : ffffd1b78274a13c
[ 2911.191716] x8 : 000000000017ffe8 x7 : c0000000fffeffff x6 : 000000000057ffa8
[ 2911.192554] x5 : ffff0012f6c24ec0 x4 : 0000000000000000 x3 : ffff2e5b72b5d000
[ 2911.193404] x2 : 0000000000000000 x1 : 0000000000000000 x0 : ffff0003ff254480
[ 2911.194259] Call trace:
[ 2911.194626]  tracing_map_sort_entries+0x3e0/0x408
[ 2911.195220]  hist_show+0x124/0x800
[ 2911.195692]  seq_read_iter+0x1d4/0x4e8
[ 2911.196193]  seq_read+0xe8/0x138
[ 2911.196638]  vfs_read+0xc8/0x300
[ 2911.197078]  ksys_read+0x70/0x108
[ 2911.197534]  __arm64_sys_read+0x24/0x38
[ 2911.198046]  invoke_syscall+0x78/0x108
[ 2911.198553]  el0_svc_common.constprop.0+0xd0/0xf8
[ 2911.199157]  do_el0_svc+0x28/0x40
[ 2911.199613]  el0_svc+0x40/0x178
[ 2911.200048]  el0t_64_sync_handler+0x13c/0x158
[ 2911.200621]  el0t_64_sync+0x1a8/0x1b0
[ 2911.201115] ---[ end trace 0000000000000000 ]---

The problem appears to be caused by CPU reordering of writes issued from
__tracing_map_insert().

The check for the presence of an element with a given key in this
function is:

 val = READ_ONCE(entry->val);
 if (val && keys_match(key, val->key, map->key_size)) ...

The write of a new entry is:

 elt = get_free_elt(map);
 memcpy(elt->key, key, map->key_size);
 entry->val = elt;

The "memcpy(elt->key, key, map->key_size);" and "entry->val = elt;"
stores may become visible in the reversed order on another CPU. This
second CPU might then incorrectly determine that a new key doesn't match
an already present val->key and subsequently insert a new element,
resulting in a duplicate.

Fix the problem by adding a write barrier between
"memcpy(elt->key, key, map->key_size);" and "entry->val = elt;", and for
good measure, also use WRITE_ONCE(entry->val, elt) for publishing the
element. The sequence pairs with the mentioned "READ_ONCE(entry->val);"
and the "val->key" check which has an address dependency.

The barrier is placed on a path executed when adding an element for
a new key. Subsequent updates targeting the same key remain unaffected.

From the user's perspective, the issue was introduced by commit
c193707 ("tracing: Remove code which merges duplicates"), which
followed commit cbf4100 ("tracing: Add support to detect and avoid
duplicates"). The previous code operated differently; it inherently
expected potential races which result in duplicates but merged them
later when they occurred.

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-trace-kernel/20240122150928.27725-1-petr.pavlu@suse.com

Fixes: c193707 ("tracing: Remove code which merges duplicates")
Signed-off-by: Petr Pavlu <petr.pavlu@suse.com>
Acked-by: Tom Zanussi <tom.zanussi@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt (Google) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
metaspace pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 7, 2024
RCU protection was removed in the commit 2d32777 ("raid1: remove rcu
protection to access rdev from conf").

However, the code in fix_read_error does rcu_dereference outside
rcu_read_lock - this triggers the following warning. The warning is
triggered by a LVM2 test shell/integrity-caching.sh.

This commit removes rcu_dereference.

=============================
WARNING: suspicious RCU usage
6.7.0 #2 Not tainted
-----------------------------
drivers/md/raid1.c:2265 suspicious rcu_dereference_check() usage!

other info that might help us debug this:

rcu_scheduler_active = 2, debug_locks = 1
no locks held by mdX_raid1/1859.

stack backtrace:
CPU: 2 PID: 1859 Comm: mdX_raid1 Not tainted 6.7.0 #2
Hardware name: QEMU Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996), BIOS 1.12.0-1 04/01/2014
Call Trace:
 <TASK>
 dump_stack_lvl+0x60/0x70
 lockdep_rcu_suspicious+0x153/0x1b0
 raid1d+0x1732/0x1750 [raid1]
 ? lock_acquire+0x9f/0x270
 ? finish_wait+0x3d/0x80
 ? md_thread+0xf7/0x130 [md_mod]
 ? lock_release+0xaa/0x230
 ? md_register_thread+0xd0/0xd0 [md_mod]
 md_thread+0xa0/0x130 [md_mod]
 ? housekeeping_test_cpu+0x30/0x30
 kthread+0xdc/0x110
 ? kthread_complete_and_exit+0x20/0x20
 ret_from_fork+0x28/0x40
 ? kthread_complete_and_exit+0x20/0x20
 ret_from_fork_asm+0x11/0x20
 </TASK>

Signed-off-by: Mikulas Patocka <mpatocka@redhat.com>
Fixes: ca294b3 ("md/raid1: support read error check")
Reviewed-by: Yu Kuai <yukuai3@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Song Liu <song@kernel.org>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/51539879-e1ca-fde3-b8b4-8934ddedcbc@redhat.com
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 10, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 10, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 11, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 11, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 12, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 12, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 13, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 13, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 13, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 13, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 14, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 14, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 14, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 14, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 15, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 15, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 15, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
johnny-mnemonic pushed a commit to johnny-mnemonic/linux-stable-rc that referenced this issue Feb 15, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Whissi pushed a commit to Whissi/linux-stable that referenced this issue Feb 16, 2024
commit ae6df65 upstream.

This is the third upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.71.1 to 1.72.1
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Other improvements

Previously, the compiler could incorrectly generate a `.eh_frame`
section under `-Cpanic=abort`. We were hitting this bug when debug
assertions were enabled (`CONFIG_RUST_DEBUG_ASSERTIONS=y`) [4]:

      LD      .tmp_vmlinux.kallsyms1
    ld.lld: error: <internal>:(.eh_frame) is being placed in '.eh_frame'

Gary fixed the issue in Rust 1.72.0 [5].

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - A call to `Box::from_raw` in `rust/kernel/sync/arc.rs` now requires
    an explicit `drop()` call. See previous patch for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1721-2023-09-19 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Closes: Rust-for-Linux/linux#1012 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#112403 [5]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Gary Guo <gary@garyguo.net>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Björn Roy Baron <bjorn3_gh@protonmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20230823160244.188033-3-ojeda@kernel.org
[ Used 1.72.1 instead of .0 (no changes in `alloc`) and reworded
  to mention that we hit the `.eh_frame` bug under debug assertions. ]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Whissi pushed a commit to Whissi/linux-stable that referenced this issue Feb 16, 2024
commit e08ff62 upstream.

This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.72.1 to 1.73.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features (that we use) were stabilized.

Therefore, the only unstable feature allowed to be used outside
the `kernel` crate is still `new_uninit`, though other code to be
upstreamed may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

For the upgrade, the following changes are required:

  - Allow `internal_features` for `feature(compiler_builtins)` since
    now Rust warns about using internal compiler and standard library
    features (similar to how it also warns about incomplete ones) [4].

  - A cleanup for a documentation link thanks to a new `rustdoc` lint.
    See previous commits for details.

  - A need to make an intra-doc link to a macro explicit, due to a
    change in behavior in `rustdoc`. See previous commits for details.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1730-2023-10-05 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: Rust-for-Linux/linux#2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#596 [4]
Reviewed-by: Martin Rodriguez Reboredo <yakoyoku@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Vincenzo Palazzo <vincenzopalazzodev@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alice Ryhl <aliceryhl@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20231005210556.466856-4-ojeda@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 16, 2024
…o HEAD

KVM/riscv changes for 6.8 part #2

- Zbc extension support for Guest/VM
- Scalar crypto extensions support for Guest/VM
- Vector crypto extensions support for Guest/VM
- Zfh[min] extensions support for Guest/VM
- Zihintntl extension support for Guest/VM
- Zvfh[min] extensions support for Guest/VM
- Zfa extension support for Guest/VM
fbq pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 17, 2024
This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.75.0 to 1.76.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features that we use were stabilized in Rust 1.76.0.

The only unstable features allowed to be used outside the `kernel` crate
are still `new_uninit,offset_of`, though other code to be upstreamed
may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

`rustc` (and others) now warns when it cannot connect to the Make
jobserver, thus mark those invocations as recursive as needed. Please
see the previous commit for details.

# Other changes

Rust 1.76.0 does not emit the `.debug_pub{names,types}` sections anymore
for DWARFv4 [4][5]. For instance, in the uncompressed debug info case,
this debug information took:

    samples/rust/rust_minimal.o   ~64 KiB (~18% of total object size)
    rust/kernel.o                 ~92 KiB (~15%)
    rust/core.o                  ~114 KiB ( ~5%)

In the compressed debug info (zlib) case:

    samples/rust/rust_minimal.o   ~11 KiB (~6%)
    rust/kernel.o                 ~17 KiB (~5%)
    rust/core.o                   ~21 KiB (~1.5%)

In addition, the `rustc_codegen_gcc` backend now does not emit the
`.eh_frame` section when compiling under `-Cpanic=abort` [6], thus
removing the need for the patch in the CI to compile the kernel [7].
Moreover, it also now emits the `.comment` section too [6].

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1760-2024-02-08 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: #2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#688 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#117962 [5]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118068 [6]
Link: https://github.com/Rust-for-Linux/ci-rustc_codegen_gcc [7]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20240217002638.57373-2-ojeda@kernel.org
fbq pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 17, 2024
This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.76.0 to 1.77.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

The `offset_of` feature (single-field `offset_of!`) that we were using
got stabilized in Rust 1.77.0 [3].

Therefore, now the only unstable features allowed to be used outside the
`kernel` crate is `new_uninit`, though other code to be upstreamed may
increase the list.

Please see [4] for details.

# Required changes

Rust 1.77.0 merged the `unused_tuple_struct_fields` lint into `dead_code`,
thus upgrading it from `allow` to `warn` [5]. In turn, this makes `rustc`
complain about the `ThisModule`'s pointer field being never read. Thus
locally `allow` it for the moment, since we will have users later on
(e.g. Binder needs a `as_ptr` method [6]).

# Other changes

Rust 1.77.0 introduces the `--check-cfg` feature [7], for which there
is a Call for Testing going on [8]. We were requested to test it and
we found it useful [9] -- we will likely enable it in the future.

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1770-2024-03-21 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118799 [3]
Link: #2 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118297 [5]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/rust-for-linux/20231101-rust-binder-v1-2-08ba9197f637@google.com/#Z31rust:kernel:lib.rs [6]
Link: https://doc.rust-lang.org/nightly/unstable-book/compiler-flags/check-cfg.html [7]
Link: rust-lang/rfcs#3013 (comment) [8]
Link: rust-lang/rust#82450 (comment) [9]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20240217002717.57507-1-ojeda@kernel.org
fbq pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 19, 2024
This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.75.0 to 1.76.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

# Unstable features

No unstable features that we use were stabilized in Rust 1.76.0.

The only unstable features allowed to be used outside the `kernel` crate
are still `new_uninit,offset_of`, though other code to be upstreamed
may increase the list.

Please see [3] for details.

# Required changes

`rustc` (and others) now warns when it cannot connect to the Make
jobserver, thus mark those invocations as recursive as needed. Please
see the previous commit for details.

# Other changes

Rust 1.76.0 does not emit the `.debug_pub{names,types}` sections anymore
for DWARFv4 [4][5]. For instance, in the uncompressed debug info case,
this debug information took:

    samples/rust/rust_minimal.o   ~64 KiB (~18% of total object size)
    rust/kernel.o                 ~92 KiB (~15%)
    rust/core.o                  ~114 KiB ( ~5%)

In the compressed debug info (zlib) case:

    samples/rust/rust_minimal.o   ~11 KiB (~6%)
    rust/kernel.o                 ~17 KiB (~5%)
    rust/core.o                   ~21 KiB (~1.5%)

In addition, the `rustc_codegen_gcc` backend now does not emit the
`.eh_frame` section when compiling under `-Cpanic=abort` [6], thus
removing the need for the patch in the CI to compile the kernel [7].
Moreover, it also now emits the `.comment` section too [6].

# `alloc` upgrade and reviewing

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1760-2024-02-08 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: #2 [3]
Link: rust-lang/compiler-team#688 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#117962 [5]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118068 [6]
Link: https://github.com/Rust-for-Linux/ci-rustc_codegen_gcc [7]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20240217002638.57373-2-ojeda@kernel.org
fbq pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 19, 2024
This is the next upgrade to the Rust toolchain, from 1.76.0 to 1.77.0
(i.e. the latest) [1].

See the upgrade policy [2] and the comments on the first upgrade in
commit 3ed03f4 ("rust: upgrade to Rust 1.68.2").

The `offset_of` feature (single-field `offset_of!`) that we were using
got stabilized in Rust 1.77.0 [3].

Therefore, now the only unstable features allowed to be used outside the
`kernel` crate is `new_uninit`, though other code to be upstreamed may
increase the list.

Please see [4] for details.

Rust 1.77.0 merged the `unused_tuple_struct_fields` lint into `dead_code`,
thus upgrading it from `allow` to `warn` [5]. In turn, this makes `rustc`
complain about the `ThisModule`'s pointer field being never read. Thus
locally `allow` it for the moment, since we will have users later on
(e.g. Binder needs a `as_ptr` method [6]).

Rust 1.77.0 introduces the `--check-cfg` feature [7], for which there
is a Call for Testing going on [8]. We were requested to test it and
we found it useful [9] -- we will likely enable it in the future.

The vast majority of changes are due to our `alloc` fork being upgraded
at once.

There are two kinds of changes to be aware of: the ones coming from
upstream, which we should follow as closely as possible, and the updates
needed in our added fallible APIs to keep them matching the newer
infallible APIs coming from upstream.

Instead of taking a look at the diff of this patch, an alternative
approach is reviewing a diff of the changes between upstream `alloc` and
the kernel's. This allows to easily inspect the kernel additions only,
especially to check if the fallible methods we already have still match
the infallible ones in the new version coming from upstream.

Another approach is reviewing the changes introduced in the additions in
the kernel fork between the two versions. This is useful to spot
potentially unintended changes to our additions.

To apply these approaches, one may follow steps similar to the following
to generate a pair of patches that show the differences between upstream
Rust and the kernel (for the subset of `alloc` we use) before and after
applying this patch:

    # Get the difference with respect to the old version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > old.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

    # Apply this patch.
    git -C linux am rust-upgrade.patch

    # Get the difference with respect to the new version.
    git -C rust checkout $(linux/scripts/min-tool-version.sh rustc)
    git -C linux ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD -- rust/alloc |
        cut -d/ -f3- |
        grep -Fv README.md |
        xargs -IPATH cp rust/library/alloc/src/PATH linux/rust/alloc/PATH
    git -C linux diff --patch-with-stat --summary -R > new.patch
    git -C linux restore rust/alloc

Now one may check the `new.patch` to take a look at the additions (first
approach) or at the difference between those two patches (second
approach). For the latter, a side-by-side tool is recommended.

Link: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/blob/stable/RELEASES.md#version-1770-2024-03-21 [1]
Link: https://rust-for-linux.com/rust-version-policy [2]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118799 [3]
Link: #2 [4]
Link: rust-lang/rust#118297 [5]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/rust-for-linux/20231101-rust-binder-v1-2-08ba9197f637@google.com/#Z31rust:kernel:lib.rs [6]
Link: https://doc.rust-lang.org/nightly/unstable-book/compiler-flags/check-cfg.html [7]
Link: rust-lang/rfcs#3013 (comment) [8]
Link: rust-lang/rust#82450 (comment) [9]
Signed-off-by: Miguel Ojeda <ojeda@kernel.org>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20240217002717.57507-1-ojeda@kernel.org
ojeda pushed a commit that referenced this issue Feb 19, 2024
…triggers

I managed to hit following use after free warning recently:

[ 2169.711665] ==================================================================
[ 2169.714009] BUG: KASAN: slab-use-after-free in __run_timers.part.0+0x179/0x4c0
[ 2169.716293] Write of size 8 at addr ffff88812b326a70 by task swapper/4/0

[ 2169.719022] CPU: 4 PID: 0 Comm: swapper/4 Not tainted 6.8.0-rc2jiri+ #2
[ 2