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Fixed small typos in the xcode template #1099

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 17, 2016

This is a rather trivial issue, but I found typos in the xcode templates. In the main.cpp files for both the Application template and the Command Line Tool template, the disclaimer part had a typo at the beginning. I know that this is a small issue, but I think it would look nicer if the typos were fixed.

@mantognini mantognini added this to the 2.4 milestone Jun 17, 2016

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Good catch!

Could you squash the two commits into one?

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mantognini commented Jun 17, 2016

Good catch!

Could you squash the two commits into one?

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I will get it done as soon as I can!

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 17, 2016

I will get it done as soon as I can!

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By the way, I am kind of a newbie to github (actually, this is my first pull request). I was just wondering, how exactly do you squash commits? I have been reading about it, but it seems kind of confusing. Maybe someone could explain?

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 18, 2016

By the way, I am kind of a newbie to github (actually, this is my first pull request). I was just wondering, how exactly do you squash commits? I have been reading about it, but it seems kind of confusing. Maybe someone could explain?

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Sure.

  • First, make a backup (simply create a new branch) just in case you mess things up.
  • Then, from the branch used by this PR (master) do an interactive rebase against the upstream version (and not origin version since it's a fork) of master; from the top of my head: git rebase -i upstream/master. This assumes the upstream remote is set up; if not, add it (github help section should have something on that if needed).
  • During the interactive rebase operation you'll be offered to edit a file to enter your actions. Have a look at the manual for full details but it should be relatively straightforward in you case.
  • Finally, --force (or better: --force-with-lease) push your new history to your github repo.
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mantognini commented Jun 18, 2016

Sure.

  • First, make a backup (simply create a new branch) just in case you mess things up.
  • Then, from the branch used by this PR (master) do an interactive rebase against the upstream version (and not origin version since it's a fork) of master; from the top of my head: git rebase -i upstream/master. This assumes the upstream remote is set up; if not, add it (github help section should have something on that if needed).
  • During the interactive rebase operation you'll be offered to edit a file to enter your actions. Have a look at the manual for full details but it should be relatively straightforward in you case.
  • Finally, --force (or better: --force-with-lease) push your new history to your github repo.
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Thank you! I am really busy right now, but I will try to squash the commits when I am able.

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 18, 2016

Thank you! I am really busy right now, but I will try to squash the commits when I am able.

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Actually, this might take a while. I only have command line tools installed on my mac at home, my laptop has not enough space, and I am traveling (for a while, too). I have read that Collaborators can squash commits when they merge a pull request, so maybe someone could do that? (I don't have write access)

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 20, 2016

Actually, this might take a while. I only have command line tools installed on my mac at home, my laptop has not enough space, and I am traveling (for a while, too). I have read that Collaborators can squash commits when they merge a pull request, so maybe someone could do that? (I don't have write access)

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Yes, we can always do it ourselves but the thing is, we don't use the auto-merge button from github for technical reasons. And at the end of the day, if we have to squash/rebase every PR ourselves it would quickly add a significant overhead on the processing time, which we can't afford, sadly. That's why we'd welcome it if you could do it. BTW, this is a relatively important skill to have when dealing with git. So in the end, it's beneficial to both SFML team and you. ;-)

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mantognini commented Jun 21, 2016

Yes, we can always do it ourselves but the thing is, we don't use the auto-merge button from github for technical reasons. And at the end of the day, if we have to squash/rebase every PR ourselves it would quickly add a significant overhead on the processing time, which we can't afford, sadly. That's why we'd welcome it if you could do it. BTW, this is a relatively important skill to have when dealing with git. So in the end, it's beneficial to both SFML team and you. ;-)

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Ok, I understand. I will try to get them squashed as soon as I have access to Git.

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 21, 2016

Ok, I understand. I will try to get them squashed as soon as I have access to Git.

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If @mantognini (mark it as accepted if so) says that the change is ready to go, I can easily squash the commits when merging.

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eXpl0it3r commented Jun 22, 2016

If @mantognini (mark it as accepted if so) says that the change is ready to go, I can easily squash the commits when merging.

@mantognini mantognini added s:accepted and removed s:undecided labels Jun 22, 2016

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All good for me. 👍

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mantognini commented Jun 22, 2016

All good for me. 👍

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This PR has been added to my merge list, meaning it will be merged soon, unless someone raises any concerns.

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eXpl0it3r commented Jun 22, 2016

This PR has been added to my merge list, meaning it will be merged soon, unless someone raises any concerns.

@eXpl0it3r eXpl0it3r self-assigned this Jun 22, 2016

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Yay!

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JacksonCoder commented Jun 23, 2016

Yay!

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eXpl0it3r Jul 4, 2016

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Squashed and merged in b1827dd

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eXpl0it3r commented Jul 4, 2016

Squashed and merged in b1827dd

@eXpl0it3r eXpl0it3r closed this Jul 4, 2016

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