A tool for enforcing code coverage and documentation in continuous integration.
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README.md

Fudge

travis-ci Dependency Status Code Climate Gem Version

Description

Fudge is a CI build tool for Ruby/Rails projects.

Features

  • Define your CI build process in a Ruby DSL.
  • Keep your build definition in your code repository and version control.
  • Define different build processes for different branches of your code.
  • Run common tasks including code coverage assertion.
  • Define custom tasks for your build process.

Installation

Add to your project's Gemfile:

gem 'fudge'

Run in your project root:

bundle install

Usage

To create a blank Fudgefile, run in your project root:

bundle exec fudge init

To run the CI build (this is what you'd put in your CI server):

bundle exec fudge build

This will run the build named 'default'. To run a specific build in the Fudgefile:

bundle exec fudge build the_build_name

To list builds defined in your Fudgefile:

bundle exec fudge list

The list of builds can be filtered to include only those whose name match a given string (case-insensitive):

bundle exec fudge list a_build_name

Fudgefile syntax

To define a build with a given name (or for a given branch):

build :some_name do
end

An optional description can be provided by supplying an about string (descriptions, if supplied, are output by the list command):

build :some_name, :about => "Runs Rspec unit tests" do
end

To define some tasks on that build:

build :some_name do
  task :rspec, :coverage => 100
end

Any options passed to the task method will be passed to the task's initializer.

You can also use one of the alternative method missing syntax:

build :some_name do |b|
  rspec :coverage => 100
end

Composite Tasks

Some tasks are composite tasks, and can have tasks added to themselves, for example the each_directory task:

build :some_name do
  task :each_directory, '*' do
    task :rspec
  end
end

Task Groups

You can define task groups to be reused later on in your Fudgefile. For example:

task_group :tests do
  rspec
end

task_group :docs do
  yard
end

task_group :quality do
  cane
end

build :some_name do
  task_group :tests
  task_group :docs
  task_group :quality
end

build :nodoc do
  task_group :tests
end

Task groups can take arguments, so you can make conditional task groups for sharing between build. For example:

task_group :deploy do |to|
  shell "cp -r site/ #{to}"
end

build :default do
  task_group :deploy, '/var/www/dev'
end

build :production do
  task_group :deploy, '/var/www/live'
end

Callbacks

You can define success and failure callbacks using the following syntax:

build :default do
  rspec

  on_success do
    shell 'deploy.sh'
  end

  on_failure do
    shell 'send_errors.sh'
  end
end

Build will by default run without callbacks enabled. To run a build with callbacks, run:

bundle exec fudge build --callbacks

You can mix task groups with callbacks however you like, for example:

task_group :deploy do
  shell 'deploy.sh'
end

task_group :error_callbacks do
  on_failure do
    shell 'send_errors.sh'
  end
end

build :default do
  on_success do
    task_group :deploy
  end

  task_group :error_callbacks
end

Built-in tasks

Fudge supports several tasks by default. Most of them depend on a gem which also must be included in your project's Gemfile (or with add_development_dependency in your gem's .gemspec).

brakeman

Run the Brakeman Rails security scanner.

    task :brakeman

will fail if any security warnings are encountered.

    task :brakeman, :max => 2

will allow a maximum of two known security issues to get through.

cane

Checks code style using the cane gem. This can be run over the entire tree or in the enclosing subdirectory (each_directory or in_directory). Options can be set in the .cane file, but for convenience the max_width option can be used to easily override the default line width of 80.

  cane :max_width => 120

clean_bundler_env

Ensures that the code block runs in a clean Bundler environment.

each_directory

Run the resulting block in each directory (see examples above).

  each_directory 'meta_*', :exclude => ['meta_useless', 'meta_broken'] do
    ...
  end

rake

Run a rake command, requiring that it return success.

shell

Run a generic shell command, requiring that it return success.

sub_process

Like shell, but does not spawn a new shell to run the command, and allows more control over the command's process and environment. See examples below.

flay

Code duplication can be detected by Flay. See examples below.

flog

Flog calculates code complexity using an ABC metric and allows for maximum individual values and maximum average values. This can be used to ensure that you are alerted quickly when new complex code is added to your project. See examples below.

in_directory

Run the resulting block in a specific directory (as with each_directory).

rspec

Run rspec, enforcing minimum :coverage as a percent (using simplecov). See examples above.

cucumber

Run cucumber, enforcing minimum :coverage as a percent (using simplecov), like rspec.

yard

Runs YARD to ensure documentation coverage.

  yard 'stats --list-undoc', :coverage => 100

will require 100% coverage, and show all code that is not documented.

Defining tasks

A task is a class that responds to two methods:

  • self.name - A class method that returns a symbol representing the task. This is what will be used to identify your task in the Fudgefile. If not defined, it will be derived from the class name (e.g. in below example, it will be :loud_task).
  • run - An instance method which carries out the contents of the task. Should return true or false depending on whether the task succeeded.

For example, here is a simple task which will print some output and always pass:

class LoudTask < Fudge::Tasks::Task
  def self.name
    :loud
  end

  def run
    puts "I WAS RUN"

    true
  end
end

Registering your task

To make your task available to Fudge, you simply register it in Fudge::Tasks:

require 'fudge'

Fudge::Tasks.register(LoudTask)

This will make the LoudTask task available in your Fudgefile's like so:

build :some_name do
  task :loud
end

Extending the Shell task

Many tasks simply run a shell command and may accept some extra configuration options. To define a task of this kind, you can sublcass Shell and simply define the cmd method:

class LsTask < Fudge::Tasks::Shell
  def cmd
    "ls #{arguments}"
  end
end

The arguments method is provided by the Shell base class and will be a string of all other positional arguments passed to the task. For example:

build :default do
  task :ls, '-l', '-a'
end

would run the command ls -l -a.

You can take hash-like options, which will automatically be set if you have an attribute with the same name. For example:

class LsTask < Fudge::Tasks::Shell
  attr_accessor :all

  def cmd
    arguments << ' -a' if all
    "ls #{arguments}"
  end
end

Now this task can be used like so:

build :default do
  task :ls, :all => true
end

Checking output with the Shell task

You can define that some output from a command is required by responding to check_for with a regexp. For example:

class LsTask < Fudge::Tasks::Shell
  def cmd
    "ls #{arguments}"
  end

  def check_for
    /4 files found/
  end
end

The above task will only pass if the output contains "4 files found".

If you want to do some further processing on the contents matched by the regexp, you can provide an array with the second element being a lambda, which wil be called to process the output:

class LsTask < Fudge::Tasks::Shell
  def cmd
    "ls #{arguments}"
  end

  def check_for
    [/(\d+) files found/, lambda { |n| n.to_i >= 4 }]
  end
end

The above task will only pass if the output contains "n files found", where n is a number, and also n is at least 4.

Using the SubProcess task

This task is useful if you want to set an environment variable for a shell command, but the command won't allow the variable to be supplied at the end of the command line. That is, if something like this doesn't work because the command treats the variable assignment as a parameter:

task :shell, 'awkward_command SOME_VAR=true'
# This won't work either because shell tries to run a command called SOME_VAR=:
task :shell, 'SOME_VAR=true awkward_command'

SubProcess allows you to set the variable this way:

task :sub_process, 'awkward_command', :environment => { 'SOME_VAR' => 'true' }

SubProcess is also useful if you need to manipulate the process's execution environment, for example, by clearing environment variables, or redirecting IO. For example, this invocatin will unset all environment variables, except SOME_VAR which is explicitly supplied, before running command:

task :sub_process, 'command', :environment => { 'SOME_VAR' => 'true' },
                              :spawn_options => { :unsetenv_others => true }

See the Ruby doc for Process::spawn for details of the options that can be passed in spawn_options.

This task should otherwise act like the Shell task.

Defining composite tasks

Some tasks may require you to run a number of commands one after the other. You can hook into other fudge tasks by including the Fudge DSL into your composite task:

class DeployTask < Fudge::Tasks::CompositeTask
  include Fudge::TaskDSL

  def self.name
    :deploy
  end

  def initialize(*args)
    super

    task :shell, 'build_docs.sh'
    task :shell, 'cp -r docs/ /var/ww/deploy/docs'
  end
end
Fudge::Tasks.register(DeployTask)

The above will run the given tasks in the order defined, and only pass if both tasks pass. It can then be used in a FudgeFile like so:

build :default do
  task :deploy
end

Setting per-directory options for tasks

Sometimes you'll want different options to be used for specific subdirectories. This is especially useful with code metric tools.

Instead of having all of these values listed explicitly in your Fudgefile you can instead place them in a fudge_settings.yml file in each subdirectory.

So instead of this in your Fudgefile...

  in_directory 'meta_addresses' do
    task :flay, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/'
    task :flog, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/', :max => 20, :average => 5, :methods => true
  end
  in_directory 'meta_banks' do
    task :flay, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/', :max => 172
    task :flog, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/', :max => 74.9, :average => 9.1, :methods => true
  end

you can just have this:

  each_directory 'meta_*' do
    task :flay, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/'
    task :flog, :exclude => '^\.\/(db|factories|spec)\/', :methods => true
  end

and this in your meta_addresses/fudge_settings.yml:

flog:
  max: 20
  average: 5

and this in your meta_banks/fudge_settings.yml:

flay:
  max: 172
flog:
  max: 74.9
  average: 9.1

You can set the default values in your Fudgefile and override them only as necessary in specific subdiretories.