Lightweight PHP API Framework
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README.md

Scaffold Build Status Coverage Status

THIS README IS SEVERELY OUT OF DATE. NEW DOCUMENTATION AND A GETTING STARTED GUIDE ARE BEING WORKED ON

Lightweight PHP API Framework

Note: This is not a usable state yet.

Requirements

  • PHP 5.4+

Contributing

In order to contribute, please fork this repo. Every new feature must be made in a seperate branch. Each new feature must have a PHPUnit test written for it. You must follow the standard styleguide that is in place through Scaffold.

Testing

We use the PHPUnit testing framework to test Scaffold. To run these tests, simply run phpunit . in the root of Scaffold.

Some of these tests have dependencies, these are:

  • SQLite PDO Driver
    • ModelDatabase

Features

Scaffold, despite it's ultimate speed and ease of use, is just jam-packed with features.

Autoloader

At the heart of Scaffold, is it's Autoloader. No longer do you need to care about loading different classes for use in your application. But that doesn't mean your application will be slowed down with useless resources it doesn't need: Scaffold operates on a there when you need it, out of the way when you don't basis.

In order to use a class, you just use it:

<?php
$validator = new Validate();
$validator->set('name', 'not_empty');
$validator->test($data);

But that doesn't mean that's the only way to do things, Scaffold provides a method for manually loading a class.

<?php
Autoload::load('Validate');
Autoload::load('Router');
// etc

Validator

You saw a little sneak peek at our validator in the previous section. Scaffold's validator is about as simple as it gets, while still remaining extremely powerful.

Example

<?php
$validator = new Validate([
    'name' => ['not_empty', 'alphanumeric'],
    'email' => ['not_empty', 'email']
]);
$validator->set('password', 'not_empty');

$validator->test(['name' => 'Bob', 'email' => 'scaffold.is.awesome@gmail.com', 'password' => 'scaffold']);
// Returns true

$validator->test(['name' => '', 'email' => 'scaffold']);
// Raises ExceptionValidate

Global Rules

There are a few ways of setting global rules, but under the hood, they all equal the same thing: The field name equaling null.

<?php
// All of these are global rules
$validator = new Validate('not_empty');
$validator->set('not_empty');
$validator->set(['not_empty']);
$validator->set(null, 'not_empty');
$validator->set([null => 'not_empty']);

List of Rules

empty

empty tests for if a value is '' || false. In addition, it will also return true if you haven't passed a value for this rule. However, you're unlikely to use this rule yourself. You are more likely to use it in conjuction with the not modifier, to make not_empty. This can be used to make required fields.

email

email uses PHP's built in email checking (filter_var($val, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) systems in order to check if the value is a valid email address.

alphanumeric

alphanumeric allows any character in the range [a-zA-Z0-9]. And character outside of that will make the rest fail.

Others

There are a few other rules that are used behind the scenes. These are regex, is_regex and equal. There is no way that you can use is_regex in your checks, however, you can use regex and equal.

If the rule name is a valid regex pattern, and doesn't match an existing rule name, then Validate will run a test for the value against that pattern. If it is not, then Validate will simply check if the value matches the rule name.

List of Modifiers

To use a modifier, you just prepend it's name, followed by an _ to the rule name.

not

not is simple modifier, it simply reverses the output of the rule.

Take not_empty for example. Run empty against '', and you get true. Run not_empty against '', and you get false.

ExceptionValidate

When a validation error occours, Validate throws an ExceptionValidate exception. This is almost exactly the same as a normal Exception, but you can access the exception errors as $e->errors. This array contains all the information you could possibly need: Which tests failed, what tests were ran on what, etc. The following is one of the errors from the previous example.

array(4) {
  ["name"]=>
    string(4) "name"
  ["tests"]=>
    array(2) {
      [0]=>
        string(9) "not_empty"
      [1]=>
        string(12) "alphanumeric"
    }
  ["value"]=>
    string(0) ""
  ["errors"]=>
    array(2) {
      [0]=>
        array(4) {
          ["result"]=>
            bool(false)
          ["rule"]=>
            string(9) "not_empty"
          ["value"]=>
            string(0) ""
          ["type"]=>
            int(1)
        }
      [1]=>
        array(4) {
          ["result"]=>
            bool(false)
          ["rule"]=>
            string(12) "alphanumeric"
          ["value"]=>
            string(0) ""
          ["type"]=>
            int(1)
        }
  }
}

The bit we care about is the errors property, which should be self explanatory, besides type and result.

result is the raw response from the check function called, after all the modifier functions are called. Check functions are your standard email, alphanumeric checks and modifiers are the bits prepended with an _, the only current one being not.

type represents the type of validation error that has occured. This can either be Validate::TEST_FAILED, for if a test actually fails, or Validate::INVALID_DATA for if you give test a numeric array instead of an associative array.

Inflector

Scaffold comes with an inflector based on that of Ruby on Rails. These Inflections are cached automatically, too!

Inflector::pluralize

<?php
Inflector::pluralize('cat');
// cats

Inflector::pluralize('man');
// men

Inflector::singularize

<?php
Inflector::singularize('cats');
// cat

Inflector::singularize('men');
// man

Inflector::camelize

<?php
Inflector::camelize('My name is bob');
// MyNameIsBob

Inflector::underscore

<?php
Inflector::underscore('My name is bob');
// my_name_is_bob

Inflector::titleize

<?php
Inflector::titleize('my_name_is_bob');
// My Name Is Bob

Inflector::humanize

<?php
Inflector::humanize('my_name_is_bob');
// My name is bob

Inflector::tableize

<?php
Inflector::tableize('User');
// users

Inflector::tableize('UserFriend');
// user_friends

Inflector::classify

<?php
Inflector::classify('users');
// User

Inflector::classify('user_friends');
// UserFriend

Inflector::ordinalize

<?php
Inflector::ordinalize(1);
// 1st

Inflector::ordinalize(22);
// 22nd

Inflector::ordinalize(333);
// 333rd

Inflector::ordinalize(4444);
// 4444th

Service

Scaffold comes with a Service Builder that allows you to manage your objects and singletons, named Service.

There as four different types of services.

Instances

<?php
$object = new Object();
Service::instance('object', $object);

// Later on
$object = Service::get('object');

You can clone these instances with Service::build('name');

Creator functions

Service allows you to set creator functions for other types of objects. You can pass these arguments as well. A creator function is intended to return an object.

<?php
Service::set('object', function($name) {
    $object = new Object();
    $object->name = $name;

    return $object;
});

$object = Service::get('object', 'Foo');
$object2 = Service::get('object', 'Bar');

echo $object->name;
// Foo

echo $object2->name;
// Bar

Singletons

Singletons are objects that are only created once through your whole application. Service allows you to store your Singletons in a globally accessible area. You can also pass these arguments.

The difference between singletons and creator functions are, singletons are only called once. The next time the singleton is called, it will return it from a cache.

<?php
Service::singleton('object', function() {
    return new object();
});

// Later on
$object = Service::get('object');

You can rebuild a singleton by calling Service::build('name');. Warning: This will replace the currently cached singleton.

Dummy Objects

Service provides you with a way to get a dummy object. This dummy object responds to pretty much anything without error.

For example, say you had an object that needed a logger. By default, there is no logger. If you set this logger to a Service dummy object, you don't need to check if the logger exists each time you call it.

<?php
$dummy = Service::get('dummy');

echo $dummy->blah
// null