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README.md

Lists Lab

Introduction

Ok, so now that we have a sense of how to read from a list and alter a list in Python, let's put this knowledge to use.

Objectives

  • Practice reading one and multiple elements from lists
  • Practice altering data in lists
  • Practice adding elements and removing elements from lists

Our initial data structure

In the previous lesson, we had a list of top travel cities.

top_travel_cities = ['Solta', 'Greenville', 'Buenos Aires', 'Los Cabos', 'Walla Walla Valley', 'Marakesh', 'Albuquerque', 'Archipelago Sea', 'Iguazu Falls', 'Salina Island', 'Toronto', 'Pyeongchang']

Remember to press shift+enter to run each gray block of code (including the one above). Otherwise, the variables will not be defined.

In this lesson we will work with a list of associated countries corresponding to each of the top travel cities.

countries = ['Croatia',
 'USA',
 'Argentina',
 'Mexico',
 'USA',
 'Morocco',
 'New Mexico',
 'Finland',
 'Argentina',
 'Italy',
 'Canada',
 'South Korea']

Run the code in the cell above by pressing shift + enter.

Ok, so the list of countries associated with each city has been assigned to the variable countries. Now we will work with reading and manipulating this list.

Accessing elements from lists

First, set the variable italy to be equal to the third to last element from countries.

Note: If you see an error stating that countries is undefined, it means you must press shift+enter in the second gray box where countries variable is assigned.

italy = None # 'Italy'
italy

We assign the varible italy equal to None, but you should change the word None to code that uses the countries list to assign italy to 'Italy'. We wrote the variable italy a second time, so that you can see what it equals when you run the code block. Currently, nothing is displayed below as it equals None, but when it's correct it will match the string which is commented out, 'Italy'.

italy # 'Italy'

Now access the fourth element and set it equal to the variable mexico.

mexico = None
mexico

Notice that the second through fifth elements are all in a row and all in the Western Hemisphere. Assign that subset of elements to a variable called kindof_neighbors.

kindof_neighbors = None
kindof_neighbors

Changing Elements

Ok, now let's add a couple of countries onto this list. At the end of the list, add the country 'Malta'.

None # add code here

Then add the country 'Thailand'.

None # add code here

Now your list of countries should look like the following.

countries 
# ['Croatia', 'USA', 'Argentina', 'Mexico', 'USA', 'Morocco', 'New Mexico', 'Finland', 
# 'Argentina', 'Italy',  'Canada', 'South Korea',  'Malta',  'Thailand']

You may have noticed that "New Mexico" is included in our list of countries. That doesn't seem right. Let's change 'New Mexico' to 'USA'.

None # add code here
countries 
# ['Croatia', 'USA', 'Argentina', 'Mexico', 'USA', 'Morocco', 'USA', 'Finland', 
# 'Argentina', 'Italy',  'Canada', 'South Korea',  'Malta',  'Thailand']

Finally, let's remove Thailand from the list. No good reason, we're acting on whimsy.

countries = ['Croatia',
 'USA',
 'Argentina',
 'Mexico',
 'USA',
 'Morocco',
 'USA',
 'Finland',
 'Argentina',
 'Italy',
 'Canada',
 'South Korea', 
 'Malta', 
 'Thailand']
countries.pop() # 'Thailand'
countries
# ['Croatia', 'USA', 'Argentina', 'Mexico', 'USA', 'Morocco', 'USA', 'Finland',  'Argentina', 'Italy', 'Canada', 'South Korea',  'Malta']
['Croatia',
 'USA',
 'Argentina',
 'Mexico',
 'USA',
 'Morocco',
 'USA',
 'Finland',
 'Argentina',
 'Italy',
 'Canada',
 'South Korea',
 'Malta']

Exploring Lists with Methods

Ok, now we notice that some countries are mentioned more than once. Let's see how many repeat countries are on this list.

First, use the set and list functions to return a unique list of countries. Set this list equal to the variable unique_countries.

unique_countries = None
unique_countries # ['Canada', 'Italy', 'USA', 'Mexico', 'Finland', 
#'Malta', 'Morocco', 'Croatia', 'Argentina', 'South Korea']

Now the number of repeat countries should be the number of countries minus the number of unique countries. So use the len function on both unique_countries and countries to calculate this and assign the result to the variable num_of_repeats.

num_of_repeats = None
num_of_repeats # 3

Summary

In this lesson, we had some practice with working with lists in Python. We saw how to add and remove elements from a list, as well as select specific elements. Finally, we saw how to use a different data structure to calculate the number of unique elements in the list.