ELSA to Elastic

weslambert edited this page Apr 18, 2018 · 15 revisions

Introduction

The Elastic Stack typically requires more CPU and more RAM than ELSA. In addition, you will most likely want SSD storage for Elastic data if at all possible. For best results, we recommend performing a fresh installation on new hardware designed to meet these requirements. If your ELSA hardware already meets these requirements and you really need to perform an in-place upgrade from ELSA to Elastic, this page will provide an overview of steps necessary.

Warning

The in-place upgrade process is still considered EXPERIMENTAL and so the usual warnings and disclaimers apply:

  • This is BLEEDING EDGE and TOTALLY UNSUPPORTED!
  • If this breaks your system, you get to keep both pieces!
  • This may result in nausea, vomiting, or a burning sensation.

Exporting Data from ELSA

By default, this process does NOT export data from ELSA. If you need the data that is in ELSA, there is an experimental script called so-elsa-export that can export data from ELSA to raw logs in the filesystem. Before running this script, please check your disk space as this will duplicate all your logs. Once exported, you may want to move these logs off to a separate system for archival. They are standard cleartext logs so you can use standard command line tools such as grep, awk, and sed to search through them if necessary.

Importing Data to Elastic

The export script provides information on how to import the data into Elastic. However, please note the following caveats:

  • this creates yet another copy of the data and so it is essential that you have plenty of free space
  • Logstash only has parsers for the current version of Bro, so older Bro logs may not parse correctly

Upgrade Process

Standalone

For a single standalone box that doesn't have any separate sensor boxes connected to it:

Install all updates:

sudo soup

Reboot:

sudo reboot

Install and configure Elastic:

sudo apt update
sudo apt install securityonion-elastic
sudo so-elastic-download
sudo so-elastic-configure

Distributed Deployment

For distributed deployments consisting of a master server and one or more sensor boxes, start the upgrade process with the master server. Once the master server has been fully converted to the Elastic Stack, then start updating sensors one at a time.

Master Server

Before initiating the upgrade process on the master server, run sostat:

sudo sostat

At the very end of the sostat output, look for the section entitled "ELSA Log Node SSH Tunnels". Save the information in this section as you will need it later in this procedure.

Install all updates:

sudo soup

Reboot:

sudo reboot

Install and configure Elastic:

sudo apt update
sudo apt install securityonion-elastic
sudo so-elastic-download
sudo so-elastic-configure

For each sensor ssh account, add lines to /etc/ssh/sshd_config like the following (replacing $SSH_USERNAME with the actual sensor ssh account):

Match User $SSH_USERNAME
   GatewayPorts clientspecified

Restart sshd:

sudo service ssh restart

Sensors

Perform the following steps on each sensor box, one at a time (finish the first sensor before starting the second sensor, etc.).

Install all updates:

sudo soup

Reboot:

sudo reboot

Install and configure Elastic:

sudo apt update
sudo apt install securityonion-elastic
sudo so-elastic-download
echo "KIBANA_ENABLED=no" | sudo tee -a /etc/nsm/securityonion.conf
echo "ELASTALERT_ENABLED=no" | sudo tee -a /etc/nsm/securityonion.conf
sudo so-elastic-configure
sudo so-autossh-restart

Check to make sure the old ELSA autossh tunnel is not still running -- if it is, it could cause problems starting our new one for Elasticsearch:

ps aux | grep autossh

If you see something like the following, you'll need to kill it and run so-autossh-start again:

4356 0.0 0.0 4356 92 ? Ss 18:26 0:00 /usr/lib/autossh/autossh -M 0 -q -N -o ServerAliveInterval 60 -o ServerAliveCountMax 3 -i /root/.ssh/securityonion -L 3306:127.0.0.1:3306 -R 50000:localhost:3154 sensor@192.168.1.3

sudo kill -9 4356
ps aux | grep autossh (verify no process)
sudo so-autossh-start

Checking again with ps aux | grep autossh, we see the correct connection information:

17707 0.0 0.0 4356 92 ? Ss 18:50 0:00 /usr/lib/autossh/autossh -M 0 -q -N -o ServerAliveInterval 60 -o ServerAliveCountMax 3 -i /root/.ssh/securityonion -R 172.18.0.1:50000:localhost:9300 sensor@192.168.1.3

Next we'll want to check to make sure $REVERSE_PORT was correctly set in /root/.ssh/securityonion_ssh.conf:

sudo cat /root/.ssh/securityonion_ssh.conf

We should get something like the following:

SSH_USERNAME=sensor SERVERNAME=192.168.1.3 REVERSE_PORT=50000

Next, we'll manually add transport settings to /etc/elasticsearch/elasticsearch.yml (replacing $REVERSE_PORT with the actual reverse port):

transport.bind_host: 0.0.0.0
transport.publish_host: 172.18.0.1
transport.publish_port: $REVERSE_PORT.

transport.publish_host should ALWAYS be set to 172.18.0.1

Restart Elasticsearch:

sudo docker restart so-elasticsearch

Back to the master server

Next, we'll need to add the correct information for UFW and Elasticsearch so that we can query the sensor's Elasticsearch instance via Cross Cluster Search:

For each sensor, add a firewall rule (replacing 5000X with the actual reverse port):

sudo ufw allow proto tcp from 172.18.0.0/24 to 172.18.0.1 port 5000X

Log into Kibana, click Dev Tools, paste the following, and then click the green triangle to send the request:

GET _cluster/settings

The output pane on the right will then display _cluster/settings which will list the master server and any remote nodes.

If any of your hostnames have capital letters, you'll want to lowercase those letters when adding these settings, given that our new standard is to use lowercase. Paste the following into Dev Tools with the actual node name and $REVERSE_PORT you'd like to add:

PUT _cluster/settings
{
  "persistent": {
    "search": {
      "remote": {
        "sensorname": {
          "seeds": [ "172.18.0.1:5000X" ],
          "skip_unavailable": true
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Next, we can do the following from within Kibana Dev Tools to check our configuration:

GET _cluster/settings

If everything worked, then you should see the new sensor listed in the output.

Last, check the Kibana Overview Dashboard or Discover and search for logs from the new sensor.

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