Skip to content

DCH Session 8 GIS and Geovisualization

rmseifried edited this page Nov 18, 2019 · 19 revisions

Sunoikisis Digital Cultural Heritage, Fall 2019

Session 8. GIS and Geovisualization

Thursday Nov 21, 16:00 UK = 17:00 CET

Convenors: Chiara Palladino (Furman University), Rebecca Seifried (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

YouTube link: https://youtu.be/tnToBmv4WIw

Slides: tba

Session outline

This session will feature:

1. Introduction to GIS

  • History and development
  • Methods, particularly with regard to Cultural Heritage
  • Spatial data formats and encodings

2. Applications of GIS in Cultural Heritage

  • Ancient and premodern contexts

3. Case studies

  • Site discovery
  • Tracking damage to cultural heritage sites
  • Phenomenological approaches to studying cultural/archaeological landscapes

4. Overview of the Exercise

Preparatory reading and reference

Seminar readings

Further reading

  • Bodenhamer, D.J., J. Corrigan, and T.M. Harris (eds.). 2010. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Indiana University Press. [not open access]
  • Donaldson, C., I.N. Gregory, and J.E. Taylor. 2017. "Locating the beautiful, picturesque, sublime and majestic: spatially analysing the application of aesthetic terminology in descriptions of the English Lake District." Journal of Historical Geography 56:43-60. Available: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305748817300178
  • Knippers, R. 2009. "Introduction: Geometric Aspects of Mapping". Available: https://kartoweb.itc.nl/geometrics/Introduction/introduction.html
  • Poluschny, A.G. 2010. "Over the Hills and Far Away? Cost Surface Based Models of Prehistoric Settlement Hinterlands." In: Frischer, B., J. Webb Crawford and D. Koller (eds.) Making History Interactive. Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA). Proceedings of the 37th International Conference, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States of America, March 22-26 2009. Archaeopress, Oxford, pp. 313-319. Available: http://proceedings.caaconference.org/files/2009/38_Posluschny_CAA2009.pdf
  • Rayne, L., J. Bradbury, D. Mattingly, G. Philip, R. Bewley, and A. Wilson. 2017. "From Above and on the Ground: Geospatial Methods for Recording Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa." Geosciences 7(4):100. Available: https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences7040100
  • Seifried, R.M. and C.A.M. Gardner. 2019. "Reconstructing historical journeys with least-cost analysis: Colonel William Leake in the Mani Peninsula, Greece." Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 24:391-411. Available: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352409X18305893 [not open access]
  • Weiss, C. 2010. "Determining Function of Pompeian Sidewalk Features through GIS Analysis." In: Frischer, B., J. Webb Crawford and D. Koller (eds.) Making History Interactive. Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA). Proceedings of the 37th International Conference, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States of America, March 22-26 2009. Archaeopress, Oxford, pp. 363-372. Available: http://proceedings.caaconference.org/files/2009/43_Weiss_CAA2009.pdf

Essay title

  • tba

Exercise

Use QGIS to model potential overland routes between sites in a gazetteer and export a map (as a .jpg or .pdf) showing your results. Read these instructions to get ready for the exercise, then follow the specific steps outlined in the video. Specifically, we will be using the GRASS 7 r.walk and r.drain functions in QGIS 3.4 to calculate the least-cost paths between select points. We will then experiment with different visualization options for making a map.

Software

Download and install QGIS version 3.4 (long-term release). Next, install the QuickMapServices plugin (see video tutorial for instructions on installing the plugin).

Data

You will need three datasets for this exercise: (1) a point shapefile containing at least three places, (2) an elevation raster that covers the same extent as your shapefile, and (3) a hillshade computed from the elevation raster.

  • Option 1: Download the example dataset, which contains a list of places that Colonel William Leake visited in the southern Peloponnese in 1805. If you need an application to unzip a compressed file, you can download the free 7-zip tool.
  • Option 2: For students who have taken the previous seminar on "Digital Gazetteers", you are welcome to use the data produced from the related exercise or project. You will need to export your annotated places as a GeoJSON file, then import the file into QGIS and save it as a shapefile. You will also need to download an elevation raster for the area where you will calculate overland travel, then compute the hillshade from this dataset. One free source is 30-meter resolution SRTM data, which you can search for using the USGS Earth Explorer Tool.
You can’t perform that action at this time.