Preflight check before first multirotor flight

kubark42 edited this page Feb 18, 2013 · 1 revision
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Having a successful first flight

First configure your aircraft according to the wiki instructions (TODO / link ?)

Once you think you are ready to fly, follow these steps to check if your craft is configured properly. It cannot be stressed enough that these steps are important to your and your model's safety. Note that these instructions apply to everyone, no matter their experience with UAVs in general, or Tau Labs software in specific.

  1. Test the failsafe. Remove all blades from the UAV and run up the motors, then turn off the transmitter. All motors must stop immediately.

  2. Looking at the PFD (personal flight display), if you tilt the model forward, does the PFD pitch forward?

  3. Still using the PFD, if you roll right, does the PFD roll right? (If you are unsure of the directions please check using the model view gadget.)

  4. Go to output tabs and test the motors, noting the cardinal directions and ensuring they are correct. In other words, when you spin up the northwest motor, is it in fact the northwest motor that reacts? (North is the UAV's forward direction)

  5. Holding the UAV in your hands, arm it and give increase the throttle to 20-30%. As you twist, roll, and pitch the quad, see if you feel resistance as it tries to right itself. Yaw the quad about its vertical axis and see if you feel resistance to yawing. Unfortunately this last test is a bit hard as it can require some prior experience to detect if the UAV is doing the right thing. What you're looking for is never to feel that the UAV is trying to accelerate out of your hands.

  6. When the vehicle is on the ground and ready for its first flight, increase the throttle until the vehicle is light on its feet, but is not taking off. Use the TX to command the quad to pitch forward. Does it pitch forward? Repeat this for roll and yaw. Yaw is especially important, as it is easy to get this wrong and not notice it till in the air.

  7. If all checks are successfully passed, congratulations, you are ready for flight!